Enough of COVID...what are you doing to the house? | Page 104 | GTAMotorcycle.com

Enough of COVID...what are you doing to the house?

Baggsy

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mimico_polak

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Ah gotcha. Thought I set it wrong or something!
 

shanekingsley

Curry - so nice it burns you twice
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What are these fittings called at the end of these water pipes?
How do you remove them properly?

These were pipes that led to our old outside water taps, but then we had then all relocated during our reno and they just capped the old pipes as shown. There is now a very small leak at one end, which I want to fix. I just want to make sure I take that cap off properly and get it back on without damaging it, since the outer surface of it is smooth and cannot be wrenched.

Thanks!
i-bCHnpGf.jpg


i-cggBWvq.jpg
 

backmarkerducati

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What are these fittings called at the end of these water pipes?
How do you remove them properly?

These were pipes that led to our old outside water taps, but then we had then all relocated during our reno and they just capped the old pipes as shown. There is now a very small leak at one end, which I want to fix. I just want to make sure I take that cap off properly and get it back on without damaging it, since the outer surface of it is smooth and cannot be wrenched.

Thanks!
i-bCHnpGf.jpg


i-cggBWvq.jpg
I would just cut the pipes just before the fittings and solder/sweat on a cap.
 

GreyGhost

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What are these fittings called at the end of these water pipes?
How do you remove them properly?

These were pipes that led to our old outside water taps, but then we had then all relocated during our reno and they just capped the old pipes as shown. There is now a very small leak at one end, which I want to fix. I just want to make sure I take that cap off properly and get it back on without damaging it, since the outer surface of it is smooth and cannot be wrenched.

Thanks!
i-bCHnpGf.jpg


i-cggBWvq.jpg
Shark bite test caps. Turn off water first and relieve pressure. They make a tool to release them but you can do it without the tool. You push the brass cap the right, then the white plastic piece to the left (try to push evenly not cockeyed), let go with your left hand and the whole thing should slide off and be ready for the next job. An adjustable wrench slightly larger than the copper makes a decent pusher for the white collar.

FWIW, I don't trust sharkbite as a permanent repair. I would be soldering on test caps once I took those off.
 

shanekingsley

Curry - so nice it burns you twice
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Thank you all!
I am borderline incompetent and have never done any plumbing stuff, so I don't have any of those related tools. But I'm always up for trying new things. I would have to get a pipe cutter and soldering kit / blowtorch.

Now that you all have given me the basics, I'll go look at some youtube vids to see what I need to buy and do.
 

Gary

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Thank you all!
I am borderline incompetent and have never done any plumbing stuff, so I don't have any of those related tools. But I'm always up for trying new things. I would have to get a pipe cutter and soldering kit / blowtorch.

Now that you all have given me the basics, I'll go look at some youtube vids to see what I need to buy and do.
Don't forget to put solder and flux on the shopping list.
 

GreyGhost

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Thank you all!
I am borderline incompetent and have never done any plumbing stuff, so I don't have any of those related tools. But I'm always up for trying new things. I would have to get a pipe cutter and soldering kit / blowtorch.

Now that you all have given me the basics, I'll go look at some youtube vids to see what I need to buy and do.
Torch, flux, lead free solder (very important, don't use electronic solder), scratchy paper of some form. A small heat resistant blanket can help avoid burning things if you don't have space. You have enough space to not need one for this repair.

If you can get the sharkbites to release, you don't need a cutter for this job (which also saves deburring).

Pull the pipe down a a bit to get the water out before your start. Tip up before you solder. Water will turn to steam and suck up your heat/pressurize the pipe, spit out our joint and just generally make your life miserable.

EDIT:
It looks like they cleaned up the pipe that isn't leaking but failed to prepare the pipe with a leak.
 

sburns

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Thank you all!
I am borderline incompetent and have never done any plumbing stuff, so I don't have any of those related tools. But I'm always up for trying new things. I would have to get a pipe cutter and soldering kit / blowtorch.

Now that you all have given me the basics, I'll go look at some youtube vids to see what I need to buy and do.

Might need some pliers as well. If you are heating the cap and putting it on the end of the pipe etc.
Don't forget to drain the water!!
 

Lyndsay

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Torch, flux, lead free solder (very important, don't use electronic solder), scratchy paper of some form. A small heat resistant blanket can help avoid burning things if you don't have space. You have enough space to not need one for this repair.

If you can get the sharkbites to release, you don't need a cutter for this job (which also saves deburring).

Pull the pipe down a a bit to get the water out before your start. Tip up before you solder. Water will turn to steam and suck up your heat/pressurize the pipe, spit out our joint and just generally make your life miserable.

EDIT:
It looks like they cleaned up the pipe that isn't leaking but failed to prepare the pipe with a leak.
50/50 leaded solder is fine for an end cap like that, and melts at a much lower temperature than high silver content solder. You can do it with a simple propane torch, rather than having to get a MAP setup.
 

GreyGhost

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50/50 leaded solder is fine for an end cap like that, and melts at a much lower temperature than high silver content solder. You can do it with a simple propane torch, rather than having to get a MAP setup.
Probably true, but why would you intentionally put lead in your drinking water? Admittedly, not much will make it from there to his glass, but more than zero. For $11, you can get flux, lead-free solder, scratchy paper and a brush. Probably enough to last the rest of his life. Melts fine with propane even on 3/4" pipe. I haven't done larger copper to know where you need to switch fire.
 

Lyndsay

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Probably true, but why would you intentionally put lead in your drinking water? Admittedly, not much will make it from there to his glass, but more than zero. For $11, you can get flux, lead-free solder, scratchy paper and a brush. Probably enough to last the rest of his life. Melts fine with propane even on 3/4" pipe. I haven't done larger copper to know where you need to switch fire.
True. I've never worried about the lead you'd get from that. Probably got more lead squeezing the old sinkers together with my teeth in the day. When I did my house, I soldered all the copper-to-pex stuff with 50/50 then plumbed the whole house with PEX. Lots of old houses were done with 50/50 and I don't remember an epidemic of idiots out there. Oh wait, just remembering the drive in today. Maybe you're right.
 

GreyGhost

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True. I've never worried about the lead you'd get from that. Probably got more lead squeezing the old sinkers together with my teeth in the day. When I did my house, I soldered all the copper-to-pex stuff with 50/50 then plumbed the whole house with PEX. Lots of old houses were done with 50/50 and I don't remember an epidemic of idiots out there. Oh wait, just remembering the drive in today. Maybe you're right.
You're probably right that it is an inconsequential amount of lead. Hell, there are still lots of houses in Toronto that have their water run through a long lead pipe. Given that the cost to buy no lead solder is approaching zero, I wouldn't use 50/50 now for potable water even if I had a roll already. I strongly dislike lead-free for electronics but don't hate it for plumbing.
 
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jc100

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So just in case I can’t sort out someone to do this for me….can I put down the concrete pad for my shed on my own/with someone if I rent a gas concrete mixer and a float? I can get the mixer into my back yard. I have no idea how many loads I’d have to run to get the pad done. Mixers+float runs about $100 for a day. They rent a concrete vibrator too, is that only for bigger jobs? How many bags of concrete for a 10x8 pad?

I can excavate the soil, move it nearby. Get gravel delivered and I have a manual tamper (or do you need a machine?).

I figured the mixer might be cheaper than getting the stuff delivered and less hassle with moving the concrete to the site. I could also be dead wrong.

I’m happy to pay to get this done but the issue may be timing so…..

Edit: also..Lyndsay…guess what, the shed isn’t back ordered anymore!
 

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