Who pays for the safety/certification | Page 3 | GTAMotorcycle.com

Who pays for the safety/certification

timtune

Well-known member
I normally certify the bike I am selling. I have a mechanic that I always deal with, which makes it easy for me.
I usually list the bike as "certified at this price" If the guy wants to negotiate below my asking price, I will say $$ but you certify.
The main reason I want to certify it, it makes it easy for the buyer the "get it out of my name"
We have all sold bikes and weeks or months later the buyer still has not changed the ownership.
As soon as it leaves your driveway you can go to the ministry and take it out of your name. I think at no cost.
 

timtune

Well-known member
Thanks for all your feedback much appreciated! I guess I should have asked the following question before. If the 2 parties agree on the buyer certifying the bike how is the buyer supposed to get the bike to the shop? Because the safety is needed to register and plate the bike right?
Usually with the plate from your current bike. Totally illegal - works though.
 

Klaatu

Well-known member
Site Supporter
As soon as it leaves your driveway you can go to the ministry and take it out of your name. I think at no cost.
I don't believe that you can do that. The bike would then be in nobody's name, it can't go in the buyers name until he goes and registers it and pays his HST....
 

Jaybee43

Member
I'm not sure how that reads exactly. If I have the 17 digit VIN for pretty much anything I can go to Service Ontario and get a UVIP, no questions asked.
Like a safety, the onus is on the buyer and the seller to sort that out. BTW, they bumped the price for the UVIP recently, it's like $40 now.
Wow many replies and many thanks! Now can anyone recommend a place to safety a bike in North York or Toronto lol
 

GreyGhost

Well-known member
Site Supporter
I don't believe that you can do that. The bike would then be in nobody's name, it can't go in the buyers name until he goes and registers it and pays his HST....
They make a note in your file. I'm not sure of the logistics (ie whether it is still in your name with a note or whether it is in nobodies name). The note is valuable as it helps if your vehicle comes up in a questionable situation.
 

timtune

Well-known member
I don't believe that you can do that. The bike would then be in nobody's name, it can't go in the buyers name until he goes and registers it and pays his HST....
I think you can. As soon as you sign the back. That's how I remember it from SO.
 

Low rider

Well-known member
Site Supporter
I feel bad about my replies on this thread. I feel like I bashed Ted Roey too much.

Ted is a completely honest and trustworthy mechanic. He does good quality work.
He can be trusted, to give you an honest quote on repairs and then carry them out the way they should be done.
He's one of the few left standing who can fix something, rather than just replace it.
Which saves you money in the end.

Repair mechanics are very hard to find.
Replace had taken over the world. And I hate it.

I think he has replaced every tire I've put on my bikes for the last 20 years.
 

PrivatePilot

Ironus Butticus
Site Supporter
I don't believe that you can do that. The bike would then be in nobody's name, it can't go in the buyers name until he goes and registers it and pays his HST....

Yes, you can...I've done it. It became a thing for me when I went to renew my motorcycle plate a few years ago and was asked if I wanted a sticker for my Yamaha or my Honda.

I hadn't owned a Yamaha since the 90's at that point.

Turns out a bike I sold sometime in 1997 was still in my name and they would gladly sell me a sticker for the plate that was also long gone that still showed as attached to the bike in their system.

As was a camper I sold around 1999.

And my horse trailer I'd sold about 2 years earlier.

The bike was a basket case (shift fork was out of it) and probably was parted out. The camper, guessing it was towed into the woods somewhere and the new owner didn't way to pay the taxes. Ditto the bike. Horse trailer, who knows...

They have a little form you can fill out to declare you no longer own the vehicle and then they put it into an "orphan" status or something in their system so your liability ends at that moment in time.
 

killvino

Well-known member
I'm not sure how that reads exactly. If I have the 17 digit VIN for pretty much anything I can go to Service Ontario and get a UVIP, no questions asked.
Like a safety, the onus is on the buyer and the seller to sort that out. BTW, they bumped the price for the UVIP recently, it's like $40 now.

when is this going into effect? I just got a uvip a week ago and it wasnt raised yet.
 

TwistedKestrel

King of GTAM
Site Supporter
I don't believe that you can do that. The bike would then be in nobody's name, it can't go in the buyers name until he goes and registers it and pays his HST....
Oh you definitely can. I've only done it once - generally I am willing to trust people, but I regretted selling a bike to this guy before he left my driveway. I couldn't make it to the MTO ServiceOntario fast enough
 

TwistedKestrel

King of GTAM
Site Supporter
They have a little form you can fill out to declare you no longer own the vehicle and then they put it into an "orphan" status or something in their system so your liability ends at that moment in time.
To be fair, the amount of actual liability you are exposed to is not very high. I can't even say if disavowing ownership does anything at all - you're still going to be the first point of contact if the unregistered vehicle gets used in an armed robbery and abandoned. It does feel reassuring though
 

GreyGhost

Well-known member
Site Supporter
To be fair, the amount of actual liability you are exposed to is not very high. I can't even say if disavowing ownership does anything at all - you're still going to be the first point of contact if the unregistered vehicle gets used in an armed robbery and abandoned. It does feel reassuring though
I think the benefit comes more from letting gov't know that your plate is officially no longer attached to a vehicle. That way when your plate gets a huge 407 bill, you have better luck fighting off the crooks. Yes, you could return your plate for even more security on that front but I often like to keep them.
 

timtune

Well-known member
I think the benefit comes more from letting gov't know that your plate is officially no longer attached to a vehicle. That way when your plate gets a huge 407 bill, you have better luck fighting off the crooks. Yes, you could return your plate for even more security on that front but I often like to keep them.
Those plates are reusable. Had the same one on a bunch of bikes but it couldn't take the abuse of being bolted to my DRZ and bailed somewhere on the trail....
 

Pegassus

Well-known member
Site Supporter
There is no name on the safety, just the work order number, inspection station name and number, mechanic's name and number . I guess you haven't had anything safetied in the last few decades ?

I've seen Ted's work - safeties written sight unseen, written off-site (not allowed by the MOT), bikes missing chainguards, chains falling off, tail lamps held together with packing tape, steering head bearings falling out. He's also had his ticket pulled at least twice to my knowledge for writing dirty safeties.

I don't trust him any farther than I can pick him up and throw him. Your results and opinion, of course may vary.

Good/fast/cheap - pick 2 because you won't get all 3....
Buddy, Honda and GM dealerships do this too, don't throw dirt on Ted Rosey. How many dealership used cars have been safetied by their own shops and then they're overheating or leaking oil 4 hours later? MANY. I'm a 1st account witness to that.
 

klr_guy

Well-known member
Site Supporter
He will tell you if things are worn or need replacements but will still write you the safety.
Um? Might be why he got his ability to write safeties checked?
 

bitzz

Well-known member
I know Ted got done for for doing "off site" safeties at least once.
The problem with "off site" safeties is a liability issue.
The "business" entity gets licensed to write safeties, not the mechanic. The business insurance covers what the business entity does at a defined business address.
Getting business liability insurance for a mobile repair business is surprisingly difficult.
 

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