The $100 Ninja | Page 4 | GTAMotorcycle.com

The $100 Ninja

inreb

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Looking good:thumbup:
 

Matt Rain

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Got my custom cables from Motion Pro yesterday. Looks like quality stuff. They went on without a hitch.

Shot a full can of Seafoam through the intake to try and get rid of an hesitation at about 1/8 throttle. It's a little bit better, but still not entirely cured. Will pull the carbs once I bring the bike home.

Oh and I need new instruments, the ones I ordered were all wrong. Need an electronic tach.

Loving the new ergos with the one-piece handlebar. Steering with the narrow inward clip-ons felt weird.

This thing is soooo loud. I love it.

[video=youtube;7Sj6xUA5h6k]https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=7Sj6xUA5h6k[/video]
 

Matt Rain

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The speedometer/tach snafu has delayed progress a bit. I got a new unit from eBay, a Koso RX2N knockoff.

[video=youtube;oOvMOKnQslY]https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=oOvMOKnQslY[/video]
 

Matt Rain

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I got the various sensors and idiot lights working, but I still have no tach.

[video=youtube;ER5xfhmDb7M]https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ER5xfhmDb7M[/video]

The unit only has one wire labeled "RPM" while the tachometer connector on the bike has 2 wires (plus a ground) - one wire goes to the ignition module, while the other one goes to the ignition switch. Neither one did anything. I'll have to try connecting it directly to a coil, I guess?

Otherwise, I'm getting close to having a street-legal bike. Mounted the front signals on the forks:



All that's left to do is mount the hall effect speedo sensor and magnets, change the front tire and replace the front fender. (Is a front fender absolutely required to pass a safety?)
 
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Joe Bass

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Afaik yes. But how about a shorty one like @thirstforspeed put on his Honda? That would look bad@$$ on your bike, as does on his.
And for some reason I can still only play ~ 50% of your videos.

Sent from my custom purple Joe Bass mobile device using Tapatalk
 

Brian P

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The aftermarket instrument tach input will surely be designed to be connected to the signal side of an ignition coil. Pick either coil, it won't matter. The low voltage wiring to each coil will have 2 wires to it. One of them will be switched ignition (this wire will be the same colour to both coils - probably red), the other one will be the signal which that aftermarket meter will be expecting to be connected to.

The OEM tach uses a low voltage communication wire that is separate from the once-per-revolution ignition coil signals.
 

Matt Rain

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The aftermarket instrument tach input will surely be designed to be connected to the signal side of an ignition coil. Pick either coil, it won't matter. The low voltage wiring to each coil will have 2 wires to it. One of them will be switched ignition (this wire will be the same colour to both coils - probably red), the other one will be the signal which that aftermarket meter will be expecting to be connected to.

The OEM tach uses a low voltage communication wire that is separate from the once-per-revolution ignition coil signals.
Thanks for confirming.

BTW, while I have you on the line - both the OEM and my new clutch cable have too much slack, so much so that I had to add a little spacer thingie so that the clutch would fully disengage.



(Before you ask, I did adjust the cable all the way forward at the clutch/under the bike.) I notice that the release lever is not as the manual says it should be - it states that the angle of the arm should be 80 to 90 degrees. It's more like 100-110 right now. I tried taking it out and reinserting it, but I can't change the angle/engagement point.

Is there anything behind the clutch cover I can adjust to fix that? I've yet to pop a clutch cover on one of my bikes, so clutches remain a bit of a mystery to me.

Thank you for your indefectible support. :D
 

Brian P

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If the angle of the arm at the clutch cover is not correct, it's possible that it uses a little rack-and-pinion mechanism inside the release mechanism and it may be out by a tooth. Usually you have to take the clutch cover off so that you can see what is going on in there. If it is a rack-and-pinion that is out by a tooth, you can then move the lever such that the pinion disengages from the rack and then put it back in the correct position. But this is just a generic statement - I don't know if the clutch release mechanism on that particular bike uses that particular design.
 

Matt Rain

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The arm is on a rod that seems to act on the pushrod at the center of the clutch hub? I guess I'll bite the bullet and pull that cover. Need to change the oil anyway.
 

GreyGhost

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The arm is on a rod that seems to act on the pushrod at the center of the clutch hub? I guess I'll bite the bullet and pull that cover. Need to change the oil anyway.
While you are in there anyway, I would consider popping the plates out, oiling them and putting them back in. As bikes get old, sometimes things stick together. Where you should have 12 interfaces to provide friction, sometimes only a few are actually working. Just a thought based on some old bikes I have pulled apart before. I don't know if I would bother opening it up to do this, but if you are going in anyway it's just a half dozen more bolts (and then you can thoroughly inspect the plates and basket so you can guess how much life you have and/or file out knicks in the basket).
 

Matt Rain

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Yeah, I've noticed that when I ride it cold, the plates are pretty sticky. I can un-stick them by hitting the rear brake (with the clutch pulled in) while the bike is on the center stand.

Can I remove the plates without any special tools?
 

Brian P

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Yeah, I've noticed that when I ride it cold, the plates are pretty sticky. I can un-stick them by hitting the rear brake (with the clutch pulled in) while the bike is on the center stand.

Can I remove the plates without any special tools?
Yes, just remove the pressure plate and springs. Then the plates just pull out.

Take note of any alignment or orientation marks that may exist between the pressure plate and the basket. As you remove the plates, take note of any that are "different" in any way from the rest and make sure they go back together properly and in the correct sequence.
 

Matt Rain

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Is there something more satisfying in life than changing one's own tire?







Yes there is, and I'll tell you what it is: paying someone $30 to do it for you.

I don't know why I keep doing this to myself. This time the tire change itself went fine, but I couldn't seat the bead. Gonna need a bigger compressor. I briefly considered riding it uninflated to the nearest gas station, but no. I'll take the wheel off again. Bleh.




An ounce of blue meth to reward myself after a job well done. (Balancing beads.)
 

GreyGhost

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I don't know why I keep doing this to myself. This time the tire change itself went fine, but I couldn't seat the bead. Gonna need a bigger compressor.
The compressor will cost at least twice as much as your noble steed.

If you want to cheap out, get a tank from princess auto, attach a big ball valve and attach your hose. Charge the tank, unscrew the valve stem, connect your hose, whack the valve open and bobs your uncle.
 
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Matt Rain

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Ima need to grab a car2go, run to Mississauga, remove the wheel, drive about a kilometer to a Petro-Can station, lube the tire and hope the bead pops in, drive the wheel back to the self-storage lot, then run back home to stop the clock on the car2go.

#urbanliving #facepalm

Meanwhile I was at Princess Auto this morning and I saw that they had a couple of tail lights (meant for trailers) that wouldn't look out of place on the bike. $12 tail light anyone? http://www.princessauto.com/en/detail/4-1-2-in-stop-turn-tail-license-light/A-p4200185e
 
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inreb

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I use those types of tail lights. I see the one shown has a weird disc thing on the back. It's not removable as I recall. You probably won't use that particular light. PA may have other similar options but some have glued on lenses. Something to watch for, can't change bulb. My go to is Walmart.
 

GreyGhost

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Ima need to grab a car2go, run to Mississauga, remove the wheel, drive about a kilometer to a Petro-Can station, lube the tire and hope the bead pops in, drive the wheel back to the self-storage lot, then run back home to stop the clock on the car2go.

#urbanliving #facepalm

Meanwhile I was a Princess Auto this morning and I saw that they had a couple of tail lights (meant for trailers) that wouldn't look out of place on the bike. $12 tail light anyone? http://www.princessauto.com/en/detail/4-1-2-in-stop-turn-tail-license-light/A-p4200185e
Gas station compressors don't have much of a tank, you need a tank to pop this on. Plus, that's a lot of work. Buy a can of ether and a lighter? I've never tried it with a bike tire, but there is no reason it shouldn't work.
 

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