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Housing costs

MaksTO

Well-known member
Sidetrack but this is the key right here....I went to school for engineering and even though I graduated with a B.Eng. I've never actually used it. Career took a few stumbling blocks out of the gate but then found my field (tunneling) and everything is somehow working well. I make decent money considering I'm not from this field, and have a good company that I work for. Unfortunately the jobs aren't always where we are, but with the coming tunneling projects in the GTA I'm hoping to work towards retirement in this field in one capacity or another.

Bosses keep telling me I need my P.Eng. to move up so that's the next step...and the PMP is in lockstep with it...just need to find that will to get it done!
This makes me feel better about my choice in school lol.

Got into Lassonde Eng with a pretty good scholarship... Ripped it up shortly after opening the letter.

Though my degree is totally useless, at least I enjoyed it. Time to pay off $32,000 of debt!

Do most people even work in the field that they studied?

I actually really liked the sciences and engineering specifically... But the academic environment really doesn't seem to advertise the sciences for what they should be - a constant striving for knowledge and bettering of humanity. Just seems to be a rat race of who can get the prof on their side and crush their competition to get that sweet co-op..
 

shanekingsley

Curry - so nice it burns you twice
Site Supporter
Do most people even work in the field that they studied?
No clue about most people, but I studied two very differnrt fields and ended up combining both later on. All my education has come back to help me I some way or another, just not the way I may have imagined when I was in school.
 

Lightcycle

Motorcycle Nomad
Site Supporter
Do most people even work in the field that they studied?
I've read statistics that claim only ~25% of college/university graduates get a job in their field of study on graduation.

I studied computers. Got a job in IT, but in the sales and marketing division. The only time I ever did any programming after graduation was in my spare time. So perhaps I'm not part of that ~25% either...
 

mimico_polak

Well-known member
Site Supporter
Do most people even work in the field that they studied?
I never really knew what I wanted to be so I decided on the engineering degree in order to open the most doors for the future. It has definitely helped me a lot and has allowed me to get into those open doors. I graduated in Aerospace but working in a construction / underground field.

The hardest part for me is showing the PEO how my experience is suitable for the P.ENG. No 'application of theory' in my experience in terms of design work, but I have all of the other requirements / criteria met. Just need to sit down and write the damn thing. Failed the 'Law' part of the exam because I can't remember dates/names etc....but will sit again this year for it.
 

jc100

Well-known member
Not just undergrad degrees but postgrad too. Out of everyone from my old labs some are academics, one is an accountant, one just retired (in his 40s) because work was getting in the way of sailing...he was an actuary, some are in industry. All very varied careers but with one thing in common, a background in science and a proven record of being able to work on your own and in teams.
 

MaksTO

Well-known member
Not just undergrad degrees but postgrad too. Out of everyone from my old labs some are academics, one is an accountant, one just retired (in his 40s) because work was getting in the way of sailing...he was an actuary, some are in industry. All very varied careers but with one thing in common, a background in science and a proven record of being able to work on your own and in teams.
Damn, goal is definitely to have sailing be in the way of my work so I can retire at 40 :D LOL

Though if I can't afford a house I sure as heck can't get a keelboat anytime soon. Unless I live the nomad life. But then no moto :(
 

GreyGhost

Well-known member
Site Supporter
Not just undergrad degrees but postgrad too. Out of everyone from my old labs some are academics, one is an accountant, one just retired (in his 40s) because work was getting in the way of sailing...he was an actuary, some are in industry. All very varied careers but with one thing in common, a background in science and a proven record of being able to work on your own and in teams.
I have always said that your specific schooling after high school is not entirely important, but it is critical that it is generally regarded as hard. I place no value on a degree if I know you can get it by continuing to breathe for 3 or 4 years. If you can get through a hard degree (or diploma if I found one I considered hard), you can be taught you what you need to know for a specific job.
 

MaksTO

Well-known member
I have always said that your specific schooling after high school is not entirely important, but it is critical that it is generally regarded as hard. I place no value on a degree if I know you can get it by continuing to breathe for 3 or 4 years. If you can get through a hard degree (or diploma if I found one I considered hard), you can be taught you what you need to know for a specific job.
That totally makes sense to me.
 

jc100

Well-known member
I have always said that your specific schooling after high school is not entirely important, but it is critical that it is generally regarded as hard. I place no value on a degree if I know you can get it by continuing to breathe for 3 or 4 years. If you can get through a hard degree (or diploma if I found one I considered hard), you can be taught you what you need to know for a specific job.
I’ve seen people with “soft” degrees do very well. Comes down to the individual at times. If you want something badly enough and are willing to work to get it, it can happen. Critical thinking skills, flexibility, team skills and the ability to take initiative are all crucial.
 

Lightcycle

Motorcycle Nomad
Site Supporter
Hey Gene.I read that you had sold your old GS.have you picked up something to replace it? Chain drive this time?
Yeah. The shaft drive was supposed to be lifetime no-maintenance, I ended up fixing it almost as often as replacing chain and sprockets... At 4X the cost per service. What a F-ed up situation.

So went chain-drive. And then other issues cropped up...
 

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