Housing costs | Page 13 | GTAMotorcycle.com

Housing costs

crankcall

Well-known member
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Though if I can't afford a house I sure as heck can't get a keelboat anytime soon. Unless I live the nomad life. But then no moto :(
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Apply some patience, and time. Most of us have to make some version of sacrifice. My wife and I both wanted a house, and a keel boat. It didnt happen overnight. The boats got bigger, then smaller, then multiple but none of it happened overnite. Time, hardwork and patience.
 

Mad Mike

Well-known member
University...To go or not to go? It's a tough question.

30 years ago there were two paths - get a degree and start a few levels ahead OR start in the mailroom, learn and work hard for promotions. Even big companies like IBM had an appetite for high school grads. My experience back then is if your job required a degree for licences or professional standards that degrees were the best option, if you job did not require a degree, then jumping in right out of high school got you further faster, and without debt.

I don't think it's as easy today to forgo post secondary education, many employers look at a degree today like they looked at a grade 13 diploma way back. It's not that the degree makes better candidates, it makes sorting resumes easier and there is an argument that someone who has additional education should have developed some useful soft skills.

From years of observation I think education only gives you a leg up in the interview process. Once you get in, success is about work ethic, willingness to compete and dependability.
 

Riceburner

Well-known member
Worked in my field of study for about 7 years after my degree. Then went into a completely different field for the next 20 + years.
 

Trials

Well-known member
Self employment (y) if you are really good at what you do nobody ever asks what schooling you have.
Been to most of the universities across Canada, but only after obtaining a purchase order.
 

nobbie48

Well-known member
Site Supporter
University...To go or not to go? It's a tough question.

30 years ago there were two paths - get a degree and start a few levels ahead OR start in the mailroom, learn and work hard for promotions. Even big companies like IBM had an appetite for high school grads. My experience back then is if your job required a degree for licences or professional standards that degrees were the best option, if you job did not require a degree, then jumping in right out of high school got you further faster, and without debt.

I don't think it's as easy today to forgo post secondary education, many employers look at a degree today like they looked at a grade 13 diploma way back. It's not that the degree makes better candidates, it makes sorting resumes easier and there is an argument that someone who has additional education should have developed some useful soft skills.

From years of observation I think education only gives you a leg up in the interview process. Once you get in, success is about work ethic, willingness to compete and dependability.
A friend worked at IBM and said all new hires needed a degree. I'm not sure if that included janitors but order desk, secretarial etc all needed something in a frame.

A degree does a couple of things. It shows the person can stick to something until completion even if it takes forever. Secondly it give the hiring person an out if the person hired doesn't work out. "They came fully trained."
 

Baggsy

Well-known member
Site Supporter
University...To go or not to go? It's a tough question.

30 years ago there were two paths - get a degree and start a few levels ahead OR start in the mailroom, learn and work hard for promotions. Even big companies like IBM had an appetite for high school grads. My experience back then is if your job required a degree for licences or professional standards that degrees were the best option, if you job did not require a degree, then jumping in right out of high school got you further faster, and without debt.

I don't think it's as easy today to forgo post secondary education, many employers look at a degree today like they looked at a grade 13 diploma way back. It's not that the degree makes better candidates, it makes sorting resumes easier and there is an argument that someone who has additional education should have developed some useful soft skills.

From years of observation I think education only gives you a leg up in the interview process. Once you get in, success is about work ethic, willingness to compete and dependability.
Yeah, no.

Thirty years ago or more, I went to IBM as a high school grad., aced their I.Q. test, they told me to get some more education and then come back.
 

Mad Mike

Well-known member
Yeah, no.

Thirty years ago or more, I went to IBM as a high school grad., aced their I.Q. test, they told me to get some more education and then come back.
Too bad. My Mom ran the department that hired and trained HS grads for IBM's Canadian headquarters, I have several friends and classmates that went straight in after HS. You would have had to be an grade 13 grad with honors (ON scholar) to get into the training programs. Everyone started as a mail clerk or girl Friday. A couple of my friends went on to great careers inside and outside the company.

You can do the same with any large bank, retailer, or insurance company today. Get in, work hard and within 2 years you could be managing a small team or on your way as an individual contributor. After a few years it's what you do and how you do it that matters - your education takes a back seat to your experience and track record.
 

crankcall

Well-known member
Site Supporter
BUT, you need that pc of paper to get over the bar. lots of really smart folks never get opportunities they would excel at as the standard has been determined you need certification XXX or degree XXX.

Im my office for summer jobs we ONLY take first yr Uni students, if you work out we give you three or more summers till you graduate. If you suck you dont come back and we hire another first yr. Its where we set the bar.
 

Supernam

Well-known member
Too bad. My Mom ran the department that hired and trained HS grads for IBM's Canadian headquarters, I have several friends and classmates that went straight in after HS. You would have had to be an grade 13 grad with honors (ON scholar) to get into the training programs. Everyone started as a mail clerk or girl Friday. A couple of my friends went on to great careers inside and outside the company.

You can do the same with any large bank, retailer, or insurance company today. Get in, work hard and within 2 years you could be managing a small team or on your way as an individual contributor. After a few years it's what you do and how you do it that matters - your education takes a back seat to your experience and track record.
How would you prove what you can do as a mail clerk? Would they be given other special projects as well and work for free?
 

black_CG2

Well-known member
I like this thread. A lot of motivation and advices from smart people. Just wanted to wish Happy Canada Day to all.

Yes, I am working today and I am happy about it! The branch is not so busy, so I get some time to read books for self development.
 

jc100

Well-known member
University...To go or not to go? It's a tough question.

30 years ago there were two paths - get a degree and start a few levels ahead OR start in the mailroom, learn and work hard for promotions. Even big companies like IBM had an appetite for high school grads. My experience back then is if your job required a degree for licences or professional standards that degrees were the best option, if you job did not require a degree, then jumping in right out of high school got you further faster, and without debt.

I don't think it's as easy today to forgo post secondary education, many employers look at a degree today like they looked at a grade 13 diploma way back. It's not that the degree makes better candidates, it makes sorting resumes easier and there is an argument that someone who has additional education should have developed some useful soft skills.

From years of observation I think education only gives you a leg up in the interview process. Once you get in, success is about work ethic, willingness to compete and dependability.
The masters is the new degree.
 
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crankcall

Well-known member
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The ability to show up, on time, be there ready to START work at 8, not logging on and looking for a coffee and a pencil at 8 will get you noticed. Hard to imagine this has become the new benchmark.

Wife is working this weekend, had two sick calls friday, impossible to cover shifts on a long weekend. Hospital rules if you are off for a day, you have to take three to be sure you really over whatever you had. How handy is that???
One idiot started Tuesday to get someone to cover his Saturday shift, Friday comes , cough cough... Oh look I'm off for three!! F the unions.
 

Lightcycle

Motorcycle Nomad
Site Supporter
30 years ago there were two paths - get a degree and start a few levels ahead OR start in the mailroom, learn and work hard for promotions. Even big companies like IBM had an appetite for high school grads.
Maybe for the mailroom or shipping department.

My first year at IBM was in 1990 as an intern, full time a couple of years later. So not quite 30 years but close. In my orientation group, everyone there had degrees. I spent nearly 10 years at Big Blue. Almost everyone I dealt with on a day-to-day basis was university-educated. If IBM hired people straight out of high-school and they advanced to white-collar/managerial positions, they were the exceptions, not the norm.
 

Evoex

The God
Site Supporter
The masters is the new degree.
Masters is next to worthless. Fiance got her Masters and it hasn't got her so much as a call back for an interview in her field. The job market (in a lot of fields) is over saturated, plenty of people with a decade + experience willing to work for same or less money then someone new. Cannot compete with that.
 

black_CG2

Well-known member
Masters is next to worthless. Fiance got her Masters and it hasn't got her so much as a call back for an interview in her field. The job market (in a lot of fields) is over saturated, plenty of people with a decade + experience willing to work for same or less money then someone new. Cannot compete with that.
Which program? Like I understand YouTube and IG is saturated but job market now too? Oh yeah....over supply of human capital, driving the price down of labour.
 

GreyGhost

Well-known member
Site Supporter
For starters, show up for work on time, apparently that is a huge challenge for some.
And not drunk. Sadly in some places I worked in the past (factory and construction), if you could satisfy those two you would be near the front of the pack.
 

Gary

Well-known member
Site Supporter
The ability to show up, on time, be there ready to START work at 8, not logging on and looking for a coffee and a pencil at 8 will get you noticed. Hard to imagine this has become the new benchmark.

Wife is working this weekend, had two sick calls friday, impossible to cover shifts on a long weekend. Hospital rules if you are off for a day, you have to take three to be sure you really over whatever you had. How handy is that???
One idiot started Tuesday to get someone to cover his Saturday shift, Friday comes , cough cough... Oh look I'm off for three!! F the unions.
You should be working this long weekend too, and every weekend!
Wait......you have weekends off?? And you're getting "holiday pay" for not working today, and several more stats throughout the year?
Take a second, and thank a union!
 

FullMotoJacket

Well-known member
Site Supporter
Which program? Like I understand YouTube and IG is saturated but job market now too? Oh yeah....over supply of human capital, driving the price down of labour.
We had one of the new millennial youngins not phone in "sick" (read: hung over) one day. Next day he said he couldn't find the phone number. Your phone is always chirping during the day with Tinder notifications, but you couldn't figure out how to type the company name into Google on it and look at the highlighted box on the right that shows the address, hours, phone number, and province? Kidz. :rolleyes:
 

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