Valve Clearance Check | GTAMotorcycle.com

Valve Clearance Check

mimico_polak

Well-known member
Site Supporter
So after my ‘successful’ chain and sprocket change I think I’d like to give a whirl for the valve clearance check over the winter months as I’ve got the time and space.

Any special tools needed for this? The only thing I don’t have is the feeler gauges, and the actual shims.

Pretty sure I have everything else.

I guess this is a good time to replace the spark plugs as well?

Thanks!
 

GreyGhost

Well-known member
Site Supporter
If you're slightly less lucky but still lucky you can switch shims around to get all valves back in spec. I wouldn't be worried about having shims in stock before you take it apart to look. It will be too expensive to buy a full set, see what you need and you should be able to track some down quite easily over the winter.

I guess the one other tool that isn't on your list is a micrometer to measure the shims if you need to replace any. If they are in spec though, no micrometer is required.
 

waitin4BOOST

Active member
Say you do need to change them, its good to have a magnet pick up tool handy.

Mine were shims under bucket, made for an easy time picking the whole thing out in one go and less chance of dropping anything inside.

I remember doing a check on my bros 2013 CBR500R @ 25k and everything was still within spec.
 

ReSTored

Well-known member
I assume this is a shim under bucket engine. When you're doing this work record all clearances on a worksheet, as well as your mileage. If you have to adjust any shims then while the engine is open pull all shims and record their size, even if the valve is within spec. After you have changed out shims for the valves that you're adjusting then record their size as well. If you do this then at the next adjustment you'll know what shim is in place and what sizes you'll need, if any, after you check the clearance. Keep the worksheet(s) updated every time you do this and you'll have a good record over time.
 

Wingboy

Well-known member
Moderator
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I assume this is a shim under bucket engine. When you're doing this work record all clearances on a worksheet, as well as your mileage. If you have to adjust any shims then while the engine is open pull all shims and record their size, even if the valve is within spec. After you have changed out shims for the valves that you're adjusting then record their size as well. If you do this then at the next adjustment you'll know what shim is in place and what sizes you'll need, if any, after you check the clearance. Keep the worksheet(s) updated every time you do this and you'll have a good record over time.
I always used a white board in the garage for the exact same purpose.
Can't get mad at the granddaughter who erases everything to write "i love Papa".
 

stangn99

Well-known member
I just did mine last winter and 6 of the 12 shims needed to be changed (clearance too tight - all on the exhaust side).

The only "specialty" tools I needed were:
  1. Torque wrench
  2. Triumph's cam timing pin lock tool thingy
  3. Something to wedge between the cam chain and guide to put tension on chain before removing the CCT
 

SVeezy

Well-known member
I’d suggest, as mentioned earlier, not buying any shims just yet. I would suspect the cb500 engine will not need adjustment yet. Good to check but don’t waste money until confirmed.

Good luck 🤞


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Mad Mike

Well-known member
Worth a try! Tips for a first timer:

  • Get a shop manual AND read through advice from your favorite CB500 forum, shop manuals often have unnecessary steps.
  • Make sure you have all the necessary tools (a good feeler gauge with .01 increments, a torque wrench, magnetic pickup tool, and a tube of RTV sealant should be the only special stuff).
  • Take lots of clear pics or videos as you disassemble.
 

Wind Shear

Well-known member
You can do it . DOHC inline twins are pretty straightforward. You'll probably curse more about the disassembly required to get at the valve cover.

Don't rush it, as you said you'll have the time all winter.
Other than the tools already mentioned, you'll just need to be:
Meticulous
Organized
Clean
Patient
 

mimico_polak

Well-known member
Site Supporter
I can't seem to find a straight answer to this (I assume easy) question...do I need to drain my tank in order to perform the valve clearance check?

Weather is still nice this week so I'd like to top it up but not if I need to drain it later.
 

GreyGhost

Well-known member
Site Supporter
I can't seem to find a straight answer to this (I assume easy) question...do I need to drain my tank in order to perform the valve clearance check?

Weather is still nice this week so I'd like to top it up but not if I need to drain it later.
Do you need to take the tank off? Can you reach the fuel hose with the tank on (or lifted)? If so, I would have a container ready and pull the hose from the engine end. If it starts pissing, stick it in your container. If not much comes out, on to the next step.
 

mimico_polak

Well-known member
Site Supporter
Yes, tank needs to come off in the instructions I’ve seen @GreyGhost
 

Wind Shear

Well-known member
I really doubt you’ll be able to get enough room to manoeuvre, remove the valve cover, etc, without removing the tank. Probably take the radiator off as well.

Edit: misread your question. Is there a vacuum operated petcock in the line? I would think there must be something like that to help.
 

mimico_polak

Well-known member
Site Supporter
I really doubt you’ll be able to get enough room to manoeuvre, remove the valve cover, etc, without removing the tank. Probably take the radiator off as well.

Edit: misread your question. Is there a vacuum operated petcock in the line? I would think there must be something like that to help.
I'm not sure in all honesty. Instructions stated that it's 'easier to remove tank without fuel' and it appears it's simply due to weight as the fuel pump prevents the fuel from coming out. But I can just as simply fill up a gas jug and use that to fill the tank once I finish up the work.

Currently sitting at about 1/4 or so of fuel in the tank.
 

frekeyguy

Well-known member
Don't forget some blue thread locker and assembly lube and brake parts cleaner and RTV.....paint marker

Valve check is easy...adjustment is much more complicated and sensitive process compared to chain/sprocket change.
The clearance dimension, you will have to feet.

But you have a good skill set, you will do well !

Just take your time; make sure everything is clean and double and triple check.
Manually check your timing a few times if you have removed your cams.
 

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