The daily commute | Page 4 | GTAMotorcycle.com
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The daily commute

LePhillou

Well-known member
Site Supporter
I'm being somewhat facetious about the rider, but I do have my own style - putting my right foot down at stops and keep the left at the shifter. Most stops I shift to neutral - but ready to shift into gear if/when needed. Only if I need to take my right hand off the brake do I swap feet to hold the brake pedal with my right.
In the meantime, i'm both feet down, in gear, ready to fly away at allll times.
 

Evoex

The God
Site Supporter
I'm being somewhat facetious about the rider, but I do have my own style - putting my right foot down at stops and keep the left at the shifter. Most stops I shift to neutral - but ready to shift into gear if/when needed. Only if I need to take my right hand off the brake do I swap feet to hold the brake pedal with my right.
After having a near miss with someone almost changing lanes into me from behind i never stay in neutral at lights when i ride solo. People don't give a flying F.

Also if you don't use the rear at a stop you must be getting quite the work out on inclines. :unsure:
 

beverage

Well-known member
After having a near miss with someone almost changing lanes into me from behind i never stay in neutral at lights when i ride solo. People don't give a flying F.
Ditto. I leave it in gear at stops so I don't have to think about shifting, or waste time getting it in gear, or miss the shift, if I need a quick getaway. Once stopped, I release the hand brake but keep my right foot pressing the brake pedal so that my taillight remains bright. Only left foot down.

Like FLSTC said though, everyone has their own style, and will do what they feel comfortable with.
 

FLSTC

Well-known member
I use both brakes when coming to a stop. Will let off on the rear to put my right foot down. If I know I'm going to neutral will also shift to neutral at this time, just before coming to a standstill. I keep front brake on to keep brake lamp lit, and to stop bike from rolling.
 

Magnum P.I.

Member
100% my accident last year was a left turner across 2 lanes of stopped traffic into the HOV lane where i was. Heads on swivels peeps!
Had this exact thing happen to me last night. I was on my way home, two left lanes in my direction were static, me on the curb lane was live with green. Lady going the opposite direction trying to make a left decided to gun it. Just got the bike out last Monday with new tires and fresh oil and no its gone...... Broken arm too :(
 

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Evoex

The God
Site Supporter
Had this exact thing happen to me last night. I was on my way home, two left lanes in my direction were static, me on the curb lane was live with green. Lady going the opposite direction trying to make a left decided to gun it. Just got the bike out last Monday with new tires and fresh oil and no its gone...... Broken arm too :(
Sorry to hear of your accident, glad you`re relatively OK!

Make sure you claim all that stuff with the adjuster if it's a write off.
 

Evoex

The God
Site Supporter
You missed my point, he passed me on the shoulder instead of passing on the left, which was open and completely safe to do so.
Oh i understood that, i was just correcting the single yellow part. He was a tard.
 

sburns

Well-known member
I always leave it it gear, right foot on brake, left on ground.

What is the advantage of switching to neutral?


Sent from the moon!
 

BigEvilDoer

Well-known member
I'm being somewhat facetious about the rider, but I do have my own style - putting my right foot down at stops and keep the left at the shifter. Most stops I shift to neutral - but ready to shift into gear if/when needed. Only if I need to take my right hand off the brake do I swap feet to hold the brake pedal with my right.
OK, take this with a grain of salt, but what you're doing is completely inefficient and takes longer to do anything in an emergency situation.
At a stop:
Left foot down
Right foot on rear brake to keep tail light on
Bike is in first gear - NEVER Neutral, unless you have at least 2-3 cars lined up behind you. Even then, keeping it in first is a MUCH wiser decision.

If you're in neutral, right hand on brake, left foot by shifter, you need to pull in clutch, click into first, take right hand off brake, close on throttle and then twist to go.

If you're in first, it's simply release rear brake, twist throttle and go.

Staying in gear like this has literally saved my life 4 times in the past 4 years. If I had to do the funky chicken dance getting into gear from neutral, fiddling with front brake etc I would not be on the face of the planet anymore....

This is also the technique taught by *ALL* riding schools.
 

r3r3r3

Well-known member
I usually hold the front brake and put my right foot down. Left foot covers the shifter and I’ll typically pop it into neutral once there is a car or two behind me. Realistically there’s not much you’re going to be able to do when stuck in downtown traffic. If I’m at the back of the line at a exit ramp or something a little more dangerous I’ll keep it in gear and have an escape line should someone not stop.

On shifting into neutral: If you’re riding in heavy traffic your hand is going to get fatigued from constantly clutching in. If you’re on a less ergonomic bike it does give you a chance to let go of the bars and stretch out a bit. I’d imagine that a disengaged clutch does add some amount of additional heat too.
 
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FLSTC

Well-known member
Right foot down / right hand on the brake also lets me easily flash my brake lamp if needed. For example if you stopped behind a car with no traffic behind you, then later a driver approaches from the rear. If they aren't paying attention, your bike may be 'lost' in the image of the car ahead of you and they may not plan the stopping distance properly. A couple quick flashes of the brake lamp to let them know you're there. Based upon approach speed, if needed, easy enough to click into gear (my left foot is on the foot board) and scoot out of there. Has this practice resulted in my history of having zero instances of screeching tires behind me? Maybe I'm just lucky.
 

Jayv

Well-known member
Site Supporter
Staying in gear like this has literally saved my life 4 times in the past 4 years. If I had to do the funky chicken dance getting into gear from neutral, fiddling with front brake etc I would not be on the face of the planet anymore....

This is also the technique taught by *ALL* riding schools.
I think i would start worrying about the fact that your life has been saved 4 times in the past 4 years. What's up with that? What are you doing wrong?
 

Evoex

The God
Site Supporter
Right foot down / right hand on the brake also lets me easily flash my brake lamp if needed. For example if you stopped behind a car with no traffic behind you, then later a driver approaches from the rear. If they aren't paying attention, your bike may be 'lost' in the image of the car ahead of you and they may not plan the stopping distance properly. A couple quick flashes of the brake lamp to let them know you're there. Based upon approach speed, if needed, easy enough to click into gear (my left foot is on the foot board) and scoot out of there. Has this practice resulted in my history of having zero instances of screeching tires behind me? Maybe I'm just lucky.
Would it not be just as easy to tap the rear brake since you`re covering it anyways? :unsure:
 

Evoex

The God
Site Supporter
I think i would start worrying about the fact that your life has been saved 4 times in the past 4 years. What's up with that? What are you doing wrong?
Same thing we're all doing wrong. Riding in this cesspool of terrible cagers.
 

Riceburner

Well-known member
I do a mix of which foot/feet down depending on my mood, etc. Always in gear until there's a few cars stopped behind though. If I do put it in neutral, left or both might be down. Stop with both brakes and clutch in, left down, switch feet still, in 1st gear.
 

FLSTC

Well-known member
Hmmm. Both knees worn/ripped. Is there a hidden message in this fashion statement?



Starting to rain, so Burgman rider gets a wave



Harley Davidson Ultra Classic - $34,000.
Beanie helmet - $119.95
Not being able to ride slowly without dragging your feet - $priceless
 

FLSTC

Well-known member
Lets open another can of worms - lane position.

My favorite lane position is in between the center and the tire track. Just like this GS rider in front. Sometimes I ride the center of the lane, my bike is wide enough to maintain a certain lane dominance.





At the most extreme, I'll be like the rider I was making fun of earlier - with the edge of my bike lined up with the edge of the car


I see some riders in the tire track which in my opinion puts them too close to the edge of the lane and leaves maybe a gap in the lane cars may move into. An extreme case of this is those Bad Example Club riders who were sometimes riding on the dashed line.


I'm riding on the left side of the left lane here. There's a lot of cars using the center lane to skip traffic and I want them to see me in line with the other cars instead of seeing a gap between cars if I was on the right side of the lane.

I have to consider that drivers in the right lane may look in their side mirror and see a gap that they may wish to move into as traffic moves up. I chose what I think is minimizing the most likely risk in this case.

Do they teach this in school these days or just the left-lane / right-track, right-lane / left-track dogma? Would I get points off on an M2 road test doing this?
 

r3r3r3

Well-known member
I'm reviewing for the m2 exit test, I have to do it later this summer. "correct" track from I can tell is the closest to dotted line. Thats what they taught in the M1 exit courses as well. I agree with you on minimizing the biggest risk instead. I will switch from the inside track to the yellow line while going through intersections - you're much more visible to a left turner (which is statistically the most likely car collision).
 
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