My first ridng season, couple questions. | GTAMotorcycle.com

My first ridng season, couple questions.

FlightTeam6er

Well-known member
Hi all. So I've recently taken the bait and picked up my first motorcycle. I'm not new to two wheels but I am new to "legal for the street" 2 wheels. An as such I'm kinda in the dark about the process of getting a licence to getting the bike on the road with plates and insurance, yup I'm a noob :glasses1:

So the questions I have.

When is the best time to do my M1?

Should I bother insuring a bike with an M1 licence or should I just wait and "hope" to pass the M2 test then put the bike on the road? Or is M1/M2 treated as the same licence considering it only lasts a few months?

Riding question - I imagine the biggest learning curve to overcome will be becoming comfortable with the limits of grip on the road. How long did it take for you to "break through" and start using more of the tires?

I did an oil and filter change, is there anything else I should do before starting this adventure?

Look forward to learning all that I can from you guys.

Thank you.
 

superseven

Well-known member
Take M1 in March and then sign up for the first M1 exit course in May. Get M2 before the weather is nice.

At this point in time get a insurance quote as a M2 holder and see what you are looking at.

My opinion is to always consider the road as a place where having extra lean angle and traction is necessary to avoid the drivers who tent to text more than look up.

Welcome to riding and enjoy.
 

LePhillou

Well-known member
Site Supporter
Hi all. So I've recently taken the bait and picked up my first motorcycle. I'm not new to two wheels but I am new to "legal for the street" 2 wheels. An as such I'm kinda in the dark about the process of getting a licence to getting the bike on the road with plates and insurance, yup I'm a noob :glasses1:

So the questions I have.

When is the best time to do my M1?
M1 puts you on a countdown of 60 to 90 days to get your M2 license (or pass the test for it with the course) so plan your M1 according to that

Should I bother insuring a bike with an M1 licence or should I just wait and "hope" to pass the M2 test then put the bike on the road? Or is M1/M2 treated as the same licence considering it only lasts a few months?
They are different licenses in their restrictions (to sum it up:
M1 = no highway, no after sunset, no alcohol, no 2up
M2 = no alcohol)
How they're treated with an insurer will differ from one insurer to another. Some won't look at you until you have M2, some will overcharge you if you have an M1, some will consider you with M1 if you have car driving experience... gotta shop around and see if it's worth it!


Riding question - I imagine the biggest learning curve to overcome will be becoming comfortable with the limits of grip on the road. How long did it take for you to "break through" and start using more of the tires?
Once again depends on a lot of things. The bike you have, the conditions you ride in, you as a rider and you confidence, how you trust your environment (cars around you and the pavement) etc.
2015 was my first season and i feel i pushed my bike decently on the 14k km i put on it. Barely any chicken strips left but obviously go at your pace and practice A LOT of slow speed.


I did an oil and filter change, is there anything else I should do before starting this adventure?
Make sure chain is lubed and under proper tension. In a safe space, do a bit of emergency braking to feel lock up/abs so you know what to expect ... hmmm a bunch of things really lol

Look forward to learning all that I can from you guys.

Thank you.
Keep the shiny side up!
 

Blackfin

Well-known member
Site Supporter
Hi all. So I've recently taken the bait and picked up my first motorcycle. I'm not new to two wheels but I am new to "legal for the street" 2 wheels. An as such I'm kinda in the dark about the process of getting a licence to getting the bike on the road with plates and insurance, yup I'm a noob :glasses1:

May I ask what bike you got and have you talked to your insurance yet?

When is the best time to do my M1?

As others have said: The M1 is only valid for 90 days. It's worthwhile getting it such that you can attain your M2 within that timeframe. You need to have had your M1 for at least 60 days before you can get your M2 though some (all?) rider courses will allow you to test for it earlier with the understanding that even if you pass, you're still an M1 rider until the 60 day period has elapsed and you've gone to the MTO to update your license with them.

Should I bother insuring a bike with an M1 licence or should I just wait and "hope" to pass the M2 test then put the bike on the road? Or is M1/M2 treated as the same licence considering it only lasts a few months?

The M1 lasts 90 days. The M2 lasts 5 years. If you don't graduate to your M within that timeframe you move back to square one and must go through the process again.

The M1 is a serviceable motorcycle licence with restrictions aimed at the new rider. I think it's worth getting the bike insured and riding on quiet public streets (e.g. low-volume side streets, industrial areas etc) to ease you into riding on the road. Save the busier streets etc for after you attain your M2.

Riding question - I imagine the biggest learning curve to overcome will be becoming comfortable with the limits of grip on the road. How long did it take for you to "break through" and start using more of the tires?

Kind of a weird question. Don't worry about the size of the "chicken strips" right now. They're meaningless on public roads. Take corners at legal speeds adjusted for conditions and your skill. Work on the craft and the form. The amount of tire you use will fall out naturally.

I did an oil and filter change, is there anything else I should do before starting this adventure?

Learn the TCLOCKs pre-ride inspection routine. Adjust as you find necessary. I give my signals, brake & head lights, tires, chain (visual inspection; tension check only with the engine OFF) and so on a quick once over as the bike warms and I'm putting my gear on. It take a minute or two and makes each ride safer. See here:

http://www.gtamotorcycle.com/vbforum/showthread.php?54256-T-clock-(Pre-trip-Inspection-Routines)

If the bike was purchased at a dealership and/or is newly certified you don't have a lot more to do. I'd still recommend checking the basics before each ride though...
 
Last edited:

BulletPROZ

Well-known member
When is the best time to do my M1

I highly suggest looking up when the first M2 riding course class starts in your area. I would get my M1 60 days ahead of that. the M1 is a only valid for 90 days and you must get m2 within that time. so lets say April 15st is when m2 classes start. get your m1 on Feb 15. make sure you enroll in your m2 class also so you have a spot.

Should I bother insuring a bike with an M1 licence or should I just wait and "hope" to pass the M2 test then put the bike on the road? Or is M1/M2 treated as the same licence considering it only lasts a few months?

i would not bother getting insurance with a M1, will probably be a crazy rate. it is currently winter, and if u get your m1 now, you should have your m2 in April when the weather is better. The m2 course provides motorcycle for doing your test so insurance is not required. get your insurance after you get your M2.

Riding question - I imagine the biggest learning curve to overcome will be becoming comfortable with the limits of grip on the road. How long did it take for you to "break through" and start using more of the tires?

this is something that you will build confidence on depending on how much you practice. I started riding last year, it took me a couple months to learn proper riding positions for leans. watching some youtube videos can help too. Most of it is about building confidence.

I did an oil and filter change, is there anything else I should do before starting this adventure?

Check your break pads, and make sure your chains clean. just do a general check up to see that your bike is functioning correctly. take your fist ride easy. don't rush anything.

Ride Safe :)
 

PrivatePilot

Ironus Butticus
Site Supporter
Lots of good advice above, but don't fall into the trap many make - buying more bike than you can afford to insure.

Those SS's always look appealing to new riders, but there's lots of horror stories out there of young inexperienced riders who buy them...only to find out they can't afford to insure them. So, before you buy ANYTHING, call and get insurance quotes on it.
 

Iceman

Well-known member
Lots of good advice above, but don't fall into the trap many make - buying more bike than you can afford to insure.

Those SS's always look appealing to new riders, but there's lots of horror stories out there of young inexperienced riders who buy them...only to find out they can't afford to insure them. So, before you buy ANYTHING, call and get insurance quotes on it.
Good advice, but too late. Op has bought a bike already again, we don't know what bike it is yet though.

Sent from my Le Pan TC802A using Tapatalk
 

inreb

Well-known member
Site Supporter
Re: riding question. I don't know where your head is at but it's generally understood that you'll have more traction and lean angle available than you feel that you might have. In other words if you feel you've overcooked a corner there's a good chance you have more traction and lean available so use it rather than fixate off the road. Of course this applies to proper motorcycles not the ungainly cruisers favoured by the Marlon Brando types with floorboards flapping in the breeze. Those things are death traps. Follow somebody to see what's possible or watch the vintage races at Mosport to get an idea how little tire you really need to hustle down the road. You won't see any cruisers on the race track and for good reason, it's not safe.
 

FlightTeam6er

Well-known member
May I ask what bike you got and have you talked to your insurance yet?



As others have said: The M1 is only valid for 90 days. It's worthwhile getting it such that you can attain your M2 within that timeframe. You need to have had your M1 for at least 60 days before you can get your M2 though some (all?) rider courses will allow you to test for it earlier with the understanding that even if you pass, you're still an M1 rider until the 60 day period has elapsed and you've gone to the MTO to update your license with them.



The M1 lasts 90 days. The M2 lasts 5 years. If you don't graduate to your M within that timeframe you move back to square one and must go through the process again.

The M1 is a serviceable motorcycle licence with restrictions aimed at the new rider. I think it's worth getting the bike insured and riding on quiet public streets (e.g. low-volume side streets, industrial areas etc) to ease you into riding on the road. Save the busier streets etc for after you attain your M2.



Kind of a weird question. Don't worry about the size of the "chicken strips" right now. They're meaningless on public roads. Take corners at legal speeds adjusted for conditions and your skill. Work on the craft and the form. The amount of tire you use will fall out naturally.



Learn the TCLOCKs pre-ride inspection routine. Adjust as you find necessary. I give my signals, brake & head lights, tires, chain (visual inspection; tension check only with the engine OFF) and so on a quick once over as the bike warms and I'm putting my gear on. It take a minute or two and makes each ride safer. See here:

http://www.gtamotorcycle.com/vbforum/showthread.php?54256-T-clock-(Pre-trip-Inspection-Routines)

If the bike was purchased at a dealership and/or is newly certified you don't have a lot more to do. I'd still recommend checking the basics before each ride though...



The bike is called a Yamaha fz6r. I was told it was a learners approved bike and cheaper on insurance then the supersports which i really hope is true. If the insurance is bad i will be very upset. My car insurance company doesn't carry motorcycles so I couldn't get a proper quote, with no licence and all. Is this bike a good choice tho?

It was a private sale so I will have to do a safety on my own. But it appears to be solid.

I really hope I can get my M2 quickly otherwise I won't be riding anything tho.

Thanks for the insight everyone!
 

Jayv

Well-known member
Site Supporter
Who is tell you that a 600 is a learner approved bike lol. Crappy advice.

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Iceman

Well-known member
The fz6r is not a bad choice for a first bike, it'd be better if you had several years on dirt bikes first. Just my 2 cents.

Sent from my Le Pan TC802A using Tapatalk
 

FlightTeam6er

Well-known member
Who is tell you that a 600 is a learner approved bike lol. Crappy advice.

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A number of people who ride have said for me it is a very good choice. I'm 6'2 215Lbs and have owned and operated dirtbikes since i was about 11 y/o. I'm 26 now although i haven't been riding that whole time.

It's a LAMS bike in Europe so i figured it would be good to start on.
 

Low rider

Well-known member
Site Supporter
since insurance normally goes by size of the engine, I'm going to say that this 600cc bike will be pretty expensive for a first time rider to insure.
Unless you are rich.
If you are, then you should have no issue.
 

LePhillou

Well-known member
Site Supporter
since insurance normally goes by size of the engine, I'm going to say that this 600cc bike will be pretty expensive for a first time rider to insure.
Unless you are rich.
If you are, then you should have no issue.
depends on the company. some are purely engine size, some are bike type. but then again, his bike has an R in it which insurers see red flashing danger lights around lol (although its a detuned version basically)
 

FlightTeam6er

Well-known member
depends on the company. some are purely engine size, some are bike type. but then again, his bike has an R in it which insurers see red flashing danger lights around lol (although its a detuned version basically)

I sure hope that's not the case :help:

It's like the slowest inline4 bike in North America. Literally.
 

Blackfin

Well-known member
Site Supporter
The bike is called a Yamaha fz6r. I was told it was a learners approved bike and cheaper on insurance then the supersports which i really hope is true. If the insurance is bad i will be very upset. My car insurance company doesn't carry motorcycles so I couldn't get a proper quote, with no licence and all. Is this bike a good choice tho?

There's nothing wrong with an FZ6R per se but you need to call your insurance agent. Insurance companies consider "learner approved" motorcycles to be those in the 125 and 250cc classes and even then, a young rider just starting out is going to be pinched. Insurance for bikes like the CB(R)500s from Honda -- bikes with 47HP and which are specifically designed to be compliant with other country's "LAMS" (learner-approved motorcycle scheme) and graduated licensing schemes -- may surprise a newly-licensed riders expecting a big break.

It was a private sale so I will have to do a safety on my own. But it appears to be solid.

Before putting a lot of effort and money into the bike you've bought check with insurance. If, after talking to them, you think you can move forward, you need to have the bike certified. That will cover most of the bases regarding safety. Check a few things anyway, such as the condition of the chain and sprockets, the swing-arm, wheel and steering head bearings, the fork and shock seals and function, the condition and date code of the tires, cables and hydraulics etc etc.
 

Iceman

Well-known member
A number of people who ride have said for me it is a very good choice. I'm 6'2 215Lbs and have owned and operated dirtbikes since i was about 11 y/o. I'm 26 now although i haven't been riding that whole time.

It's a LAMS bike in Europe so i figured it would be good to start on.
For your height and size along with your prior dirt experience, you'll be fine. It'll be insurance that's tough but at least you're over the 25 mark, that'll help.

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FlightTeam6er

Well-known member
There's nothing wrong with an FZ6R per se but you need to call your insurance agent. Insurance companies consider "learner approved" motorcycles to be those in the 125 and 250cc classes and even then, a young rider just starting out is going to be pinched. Insurance for bikes like the CB(R)500s from Honda -- bikes with 47HP and which are specifically designed to be compliant with other country's "LAMS" (learner-approved motorcycle scheme) and graduated licensing schemes -- may surprise a newly-licensed riders expecting a big break.



Before putting a lot of effort and money into the bike you've bought check with insurance. If, after talking to them, you think you can move forward, you need to have the bike certified. That will cover most of the bases regarding safety. Check a few things anyway, such as the condition of the chain and sprockets, the swing-arm, wheel and steering head bearings, the fork and shock seals and function, the condition and date code of the tires, cables and hydraulics etc etc.

I will check with the insurance companies to see where I stand. I'm hoping for something under a grand/yr. I think that's fair.


I appreciate you taking the time to point me in the right direction btw.
 

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