Any GTAM'ers own an electric vehicle? | Page 130 | GTAMotorcycle.com

Any GTAM'ers own an electric vehicle?

caboose56

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Coming off Golf hatchback, I didn't find the space in the back big. Plus the back is really slanted, less boxy ... which takes some usable space away in my opinion.

You know why they put the imaginary 3rd seat to the second row? .... you can thank the government rebate BS rules .... 5 seaters are entitled to more money than 4 seaters, even though they really can sit only 4 adults and a cat or small dog. When you have a government formula to beat to maximize your rebate, who cares how many adults it can sit .... LOL
Right, the body shape of a Golf would provide a lot more cargo capacity.

But when comparing it to a sedan, I have no idea why people buy sedans, I think it's pretty decent. The slanty back does rob some cargo space which is a bit unfortunate, the Cruze hatch has a more practical shape.
 

mxs

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Agreed .... I have not owned a sedan yet in my life and never will, unless it's given to me free .... And let me also tell you, that I now know why people buy the Soul so much as a practical city car which easily fits into a small garage space .... :)
 

Plant_W

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You know why they put the imaginary 3rd seat to the second row? .... you can thank the government rebate BS rules .... 5 seaters are entitled to more money than 4 seaters, even though they really can sit only 4 adults and a cat or small dog. When you have a government formula to beat to maximize your rebate, who cares how many adults it can sit .... LOL
I can guarantee you that Chevy did not add a small third seat to the Volt because of Ontario's EV incentive program. Chevy doesn't care about Ontario as a market. We're insignificant to them.
 

shanekingsley

Curry - so nice it burns you twice
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Very nice car. It was an LT with leather interior, heated seats and heated steering wheel.
Sticker was $43K
FYI, the heated seats and steering wheel are stock items on the most basic Volt at least from 2018 onward - maybe earlier. Did you sit in the back seat?
After driving the car for 6 weeks now, I can say I don't like the field of view from the side mirrors. I guess because they are flat, they show less than mirrors I am used to, Not sure why they went that route.
I do like the car and it is a nice driving experience.
 

Brian P

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I can guarantee you that Chevy did not add a small third seat to the Volt because of Ontario's EV incentive program. Chevy doesn't care about Ontario as a market. We're insignificant to them.
Probably wasn't just Ontario that had this as a factor.
 

caboose56

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FYI, the heated seats and steering wheel are stock items on the most basic Volt at least from 2018 onward - maybe earlier. Did you sit in the back seat?
After driving the car for 6 weeks now, I can say I don't like the field of view from the side mirrors. I guess because they are flat, they show less than mirrors I am used to, Not sure why they went that route.
I do like the car and it is a nice driving experience.
I did sit in the back seat. Not bad. Would be primarily for the kids so adult sized legroom isn’t really a necessity.

I’m currently driving an F250 with tow mirrors. By comparison, mirrors on everything else are terrible. But yes, they’re small, I might end up adding the small convex stick on mirrors.
 

mxs

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I can guarantee you that Chevy did not add a small third seat to the Volt because of Ontario's EV incentive program. Chevy doesn't care about Ontario as a market. We're insignificant to them.
So what would be the reason to add a fake seat (considering the size and console right in front of it)? BTW, the rebate programs are hardly Ontario inventions. I don't profess to know the details of programs elsewhere, but I doubt the number of seats in a vehicle is uniquely Ontario thing as part of the rebate formula.
 

mxs

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LOL .... just another expert on Tesla, eh? What else is new? ... or better yet, what other theme than Tesla topic ensures endless bandwidth traffic these days?

Someone counted, that literally daily, tens of people make a video or write an article about how Tesla is doomed. Maybe not today, but surely tomorrow or day after .... and yet here we are today, 16 or so years later just trying to make 200K cars in 2018. Pretty good for a company as dead as this guy and other guys frequently suggest. Would you agree that by their own track record, they either simply refuse to understand the Tesla topic as an energy company, or flat out lie about it, just to push their real agenda through? Otherwise, how is it possible that they could be so wrong so frequently?
 

SunnY S

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Tesla claims one of my clients will receive his 3 in "2 to 6 weeks", can't wait to check it out in person.
 

Brian P

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Long but worth watching for those interested. Autoline Detroit talks to Sandy Munro, whose company has almost completed their disassembly and review of the Tesla Model 3.

https://www.youtube.com/watch?time_continue=1&v=CpCrkO1x-Qo

Summary for those without the time to watch the whole thing ...

The good: Circuit boards, battery, suspension and steering. The "skateboard" - the basic vehicle platform underneath - is really good. The circuit boards in particular drew praise.

The bad: The body-in-white is heavy and it looks like the design was never optimized for weight or cost - either the designers weren't experienced or the design was rushed through. Build quality is sloppy (one example noted was that an insulating panel inside the doors were installed shiny-side-out on one side of the car and felt-side-out on the other side). Some parts of the body are unnecessarily complex - a certain part at the back of the car that could have easily been made from fiberglass is instead made from many small steel parts welded together. Some details defy understanding - like a stamped and welded suspension arm which is then put into an injection molding machine and overmolded with plastic and then has a mysterious steel weight secured to it with zip-ties.
 

Evoex

The God
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They are a tech company not a car company and sometimes it shows.
 

Brian P

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From that article: No corrosion warranty??

This is the first car model produced by this company that has a mostly-steel bodyshell.
 

SunnY S

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Majority of ppl lease these things up to the warranty period (4 years tesla), after 2 to 4 years, they will hand the "keys" back. This won't sway many.
 

Brian P

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Stuff like that affects resale value which eventually affects residual values on leases.
 

mxs

Well-known member
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Long but worth watching for those interested. Autoline Detroit talks to Sandy Munro, whose company has almost completed their disassembly and review of the Tesla Model 3.

https://www.youtube.com/watch?time_continue=1&v=CpCrkO1x-Qo

Summary for those without the time to watch the whole thing ...

The good: Circuit boards, battery, suspension and steering. The "skateboard" - the basic vehicle platform underneath - is really good. The circuit boards in particular drew praise.

The bad: The body-in-white is heavy and it looks like the design was never optimized for weight or cost - either the designers weren't experienced or the design was rushed through. Build quality is sloppy (one example noted was that an insulating panel inside the doors were installed shiny-side-out on one side of the car and felt-side-out on the other side). Some parts of the body are unnecessarily complex - a certain part at the back of the car that could have easily been made from fiberglass is instead made from many small steel parts welded together. Some details defy understanding - like a stamped and welded suspension arm which is then put into an injection molding machine and overmolded with plastic and then has a mysterious steel weight secured to it with zip-ties.
That was an interesting video. I am not sure I believe all of his conclusions or opinions (just because there's not many people who have done what they have, yet). Suspension arm and a zip tied mysterious , probably, vibration damper? ... yeah, that was kind of weird. One would love to hear someone from Tesla design team to explain that.

He sort of confirmed what very few others have already confirmed about a year ago ... when they made it to the second floor of Tesla GF building where they can work their battery and electronics magic. Those people people could not talk obviously, but they have said the stuff they saw just blew them away. And this was exactly the reaction of Munro, when he was talking about the battery, electronics boards etc. .... I think it's safe to say they have a pretty good lead on those things. Now they just have to find money and time to fix some of the basic mechanical shortcomings.

The one thing I will say though .... if you are model 3 owner, do you care that your body shell is very heavy? Or that the suspension arms have some weird stuff attached to them? The car drives like on rails, so obviously they have done many things well. I think the criticism is more Sandy doing his wink wink ... "we can help if you pay us". And he's probably not wrong, but it's rather a concern for Tesla (to make the body lighter and cheaper, so their profitability per car is higher), not so much for their customer base.
 

mxs

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They are a tech company not a car company and sometimes it shows.
I am not sure I would agree with this. It's cliche phrase these days used by many .... Surely, they started as tech company and probably still are predominantly focused on the tech side R&D, but to say that it doesn't make them a car company is coming across wrong for me. If that were true, I'd expect their cars to drive and steer like crap ... and we know it's quite the opposite. So I have to ask what makes a tech company a car company, in your opinion? ... we do know that they ignore the usual legacy OEM's "design, test, redesign, test again and test more until all is perfect" process ... but does that for example disqualify them to be considered a car company?
 

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