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Post your cocktails and wines!

J_F

gringo diablo
Site Supporter
was in a pub a few days ago and they had Basil Mojito
mint was substituted with fresh basil
it was surprisingly, very good
 

mbroyda

Well-known member
I recently went back to one of my most favorite early cocktails. This is an old fashioned cocktail with Bulleit bourbon and premium Toschi Italian black cherries in syrup

I used to make a pretty mean scotch old fashioned, starting with good alcohol is really the secret IMO, cocktails used to be a way to mask crappy liquor back in the day, these days you gotta start with good ingredients in order to get a good result
 

jc100

Well-known member
J Lohr Cabernet Sauvignon from California. Can’t believe I haven’t had this before. It’s super smooth and really amazing for the price. About $20 a bottle.
 

kwtoxman

Well-known member
I've lately been really enjoying a few bourbon old fashioned cocktails using a muddled sugar cube, angostura bitters and Italian Amarena Toschi black cherries in syrup. On ice. It's excellent with Bulleit bourbon. Top notch.


Have a great weekend.
 
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kwtoxman

Well-known member
I'm really enjoying a white ON wine again, it's a 2011 Tawse David's Block Chardonnay this time. Their unique terroir component is unmistakable here, and Tawse has some great Chardonnay wines imo.



On the back label:
This barrel-fermented Chardonnay was made with hand-harvested grapes from the David's Block estate vineyard. Only 4 barrels were selected to produce this certified organic and biodynamic wine. Aged in French oak for 12 months, this aromatic wine displays notes of green apple, pink grapefruit and a hint of spice.
Have a great weekend.
 
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jc100

Well-known member
Whenever a Chardonnay does not mention vanilla/toasted or buttery flavours and instead mentions citrus flavours....I pass. Climate is too cold/short to develop the full flavour of a good Chardonnay even with decent aging. Okanagen versions may be ok.
 

kwtoxman

Well-known member
Your association is incorrect and unfortunate. Buttery and toasty flavours in Chardonnay wines have absolutely nothing to do with growing region or climate. Those aspects come from malolactic fermentation and the types/newness of oak barrels used. This is basic stuff.
3 Styles of California Chardonnay Perfect for Mother’s Day
The Best Chardonnay - The Reverse Wine Snob Picks!

Buttery and toasty Chardonnays are out of style now and harder to find, but they are out there and quality examples can be found across all wine growing regions. All this buttery Chardonnay talk has me craving a buttery chardonnay, lol.




Moving on... to a Campari on the rocks cocktail. It's an excellent drink and sipper
. Wikipedia reports that
Wine Enthusiast has reviewed Campari on a number of occasions, most recently giving it a score of "96–100" ... Proof66 rates Campari in the Top 10 percentile of liqueurs in the world.


Enjoy the weekend.
 
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jc100

Well-known member
Your association is incorrect and unfortunate. Buttery and toasty flavours in Chardonnay wines have absolutely nothing to do with growing region or climate. Those aspects come from malolactic fermentation and the types/newness of oak barrels used. This is basic stuff.
3 Styles of California Chardonnay Perfect for Mother’s Day
The Best Chardonnay - The Reverse Wine Snob Picks!

Buttery and toasty Chardonnays are out of style now and harder to find, but they are out there and quality examples can be found across all wine growing regions.




Moving on... to a Campari on the rocks cocktail. It's an excellent drink and sipper
. Wikipedia reports that



Enjoy the weekend.
Not incorrect at all. Education time...not googled by the way, I’ve actually been to the vineyards or lived in these places. Lets look at some basic (very) geography and climate. Those -15C nights in Bordeaux are epic I’ve always been told and the near tundra conditions in Epernay are what really makes for a good champagne. Or not. Lol. There’s a shorter growing/budding and fruiting season here despite being on a similar latitude to some major wine growing regions, even LCBO promotional material shows this. In addition, fires/heating is often employed in Ontario vineyards during the winter in order for the vines to survive (show me where this happens in the Loire Valley or Sonoma?). Latitude isn’t everything. Limestone soils aren’t all equal, chalky soils (different form of calcium carbonate) are what makes for some of the better French vintages, for example take the Champagne region not far from Paris. Interestingly the chalk found at the white cliffs of Dover is the same as that in the soil at Epernay/Reims etc and French farmers have bought up land to grow grapes due to climate change in southern England, the climate in parts of southern England now mimics that of the Champagne region. It's an attractive growing area for major grape varietals now, it hasn’t made much of a mark as it’s not that old and established yet but some of the wines from there are not bad. Oh, and don’t forget sea currents that do affect the climate near coastal areas of the major producers in Australia, California and Europe. I forget how salty Lake Ontario is and how often the Mediterranean/the Channel has frozen over? As for styles being more popular, I would be very wary of producers who have no hope of emulating a particular style telling the public that their competitors are out of style especially when those competitors have the majority of the world market. When you gradually start spending more for a Chardonnay I'll let you guess whether they become more minerally in taste or less. Finally, the one main wine growing region that does have a similar climate to Canada, Alsace (the Vosges Mountains are a popular skiing area in the winter), doesn’t even really bother with making Chardonnay, ever wonder why? Here Endeth the Lesson.
 
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Mad Mike

Well-known member
No pic, but I'm testing my first batch of Mike's 20,000RPM home crafted vodka. Astonishingly simple to make... or I got really lucky. First batch finished at 10.1l, cost $16 for ingredients and $5 propane.

Hopefully I'll still be able to see in the morning.
 

jc100

Well-known member
No pic, but I'm testing my first batch of Mike's 20,000RPM home crafted vodka. Astonishingly simple to make... or I got really lucky. First batch finished at 10.1l, cost $16 for ingredients and $5 propane.

Hopefully I'll still be able to see in the morning.
What did you use to distil it? What was the raw liquor? A friend of mine showed me some gizmo he uses that distils a few hundred mls at a time. Looked interesting. One time my wife’s company did a wine brew thing. She got 30 bottles of undrinkeable gutrot and I considered distilling the lot.
 

Mad Mike

Well-known member
A regular home made still. Holds 25l of mash, has a 3'x2" reflux column and a thumper coil. Dribbles out about 1.5 l/hr. Came thru the parrot at 86% ABV. I pushed it through a good quality Dupont filtration system and it's tasteless and crystal clear.
 

jc100

Well-known member
A regular home made still. Holds 25l of mash, has a 3'x2" reflux column and a thumper coil. Dribbles out about 1.5 l/hr. Came thru the parrot at 86% ABV. I pushed it through a good quality Dupont filtration system and it's tasteless and crystal clear.
Is that charcoal filtration or a commercial set up with resins? If you can get the temp of the vapour just before it condenses you shouldn’t go blind plus you have a long reflux column which helps separation. Discarding the first bit of condensate would also cut down on any potential methanol contamination as that comes off first. Did you use potatoes or corn?
 

Mad Mike

Well-known member
The filtration is a home water setup made by Dupont. It's filtration is carbon and particulate, better than most commercial specs, just has a very low volume capability.

I'm pretty good with the science behind distillation, I have precise temp control and the 'heads' are minimal in the mash I made. I tossed the first 300ml from each 20l run -- that's about double safety margin.

I just used a sugar mash. This is Vodka and it's running thru a reflux column, no taste, and the batch is so small that $5 extra cost for sugar is worth the time savings. I do have a batch of corn, from the same crop used by a sizable Ontario rye whiskey maker, I'll try that using just the thumper once I gather a bit of experience.
 

kwtoxman

Well-known member
Not incorrect at all. Education time...not googled by the way, I’ve actually been to the vineyards or lived in these places. Lets look at some basic (very) geography and climate. Those -15C nights in Bordeaux are epic I’ve always been told and the near tundra conditions in Epernay are what really makes for a good champagne. Or not. Lol. There’s a shorter growing/budding and fruiting season here despite being on a similar latitude to some major wine growing regions, even LCBO promotional material shows this. In addition, fires/heating is often employed in Ontario vineyards during the winter in order for the vines to survive (show me where this happens in the Loire Valley or Sonoma?). Latitude isn’t everything. Limestone soils aren’t all equal, chalky soils (different form of calcium carbonate) are what makes for some of the better French vintages, for example take the Champagne region not far from Paris. Interestingly the chalk found at the white cliffs of Dover is the same as that in the soil at Epernay/Reims etc and French farmers have bought up land to grow grapes due to climate change in southern England, the climate in parts of southern England now mimics that of the Champagne region. It's an attractive growing area for major grape varietals now, it hasn’t made much of a mark as it’s not that old and established yet but some of the wines from there are not bad. Oh, and don’t forget sea currents that do affect the climate near coastal areas of the major producers in Australia, California and Europe. I forget how salty Lake Ontario is and how often the Mediterranean/the Channel has frozen over? As for styles being more popular, I would be very wary of producers who have no hope of emulating a particular style telling the public that their competitors are out of style especially when those competitors have the majority of the world market. When you gradually start spending more for a Chardonnay I'll let you guess whether they become more minerally in taste or less. Finally, the one main wine growing region that does have a similar climate to Canada, Alsace (the Vosges Mountains are a popular skiing area in the winter), doesn’t even really bother with making Chardonnay, ever wonder why? Here Endeth the Lesson.
Quoted for posterity. Yawn, a patronizing response conflating terroir to obfuscate the basic facts around malolatic fermentation and oak barrel use in Chardonnay wine production. You're not the only person who's visited vineyards or has an education. That whole response is totally misleading but not surprising. You've posted multiple times of your dislike for Ontario wines (as well as many Canadian wines), everyone gets it, and you still can't stay away from crapping all over wine posts here that don't meet your preferences/opinions. It's time to be done with your insults and broken record negativity. Let people enjoy their wines and cocktails here... that "shouldn't" be much to expect.
 
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jc100

Well-known member
Quoted for posterity. Yawn, a patronizing response conflating terroir to obfuscate the basic facts around malolatic fermentation and oak barrel use in Chardonnay wine production. You're not the only person who's visited vineyards or has an education. That whole response is totally misleading but not surprising. You've posted multiple times of your dislike for Ontario wines (as well as many Canadian wines), everyone gets it, and you still can't stay away from crapping all over wine posts here that don't meet your preferences/opinions. It's time to be done with your insults and broken record negativity. Let people enjoy their wines and cocktails here... that "shouldn't" be much to expect.
Agreed. Glad I could educate you. Back to regular programming.
 

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