Law Enforcement - The Good, The Bad, The Ugly..... | Page 229 | GTAMotorcycle.com

Law Enforcement - The Good, The Bad, The Ugly.....

Who was in the wrong?

  • Cop

    Votes: 22 21.6%
  • Dude who got shot

    Votes: 31 30.4%
  • I like turtles

    Votes: 49 48.0%

  • Total voters
    102

Delboy

Well-known member
Sorry for the facebook link. As always, the video doesn't show what led up to the altercation but there is a version of the story in the description.

TL: DW Barrie police beat the crap out of a teenager for skateboarding on the road (or more likely not respecting his authority)


Edit:

Barrie police provided a non-update (we are aware of video and investigating). Afaik, kid did not receive serious injuries so for better or worse, siu will probably have no involvement.


That's some serious out of control anger right there. Since there were no serious injuries the SIU will do nothing about it, although they would most likely have cleared the guy anyway.

The big challenge in Canada is that while you could bring a private prosecution against these thugs, it will also go no where. From what I understand you can file a private prosecution and present your evidence before a Judge, the defendant does not have to be summoned at this stage. If the Judge deems there is enough evidence to proceed then it has to be turned over to the Crown, who typically just drop the case.

I believe this is what happened to the private prosecutions brought against Fantino.
 

Delboy

Well-known member
The other thing you should also do is record any interaction with the cops. You are allowed

I was making a left turn from King street onto Atlantic Avenue a few years ago. You can't make a left turn there after 4:00 pm but it was around 3:55. At least it was at the time.

As soon as I made the turn I was pulled over by a cop from 12 Division. I pulled out my phone turned on the camera and put it in the cup holder. I argued with the guy that it wasn't 4:00. He claimed it was by his watch. I guess it was 4 O'clock somewhere.

Took the ticket, went to court, showed the video to the judge with the time stamp and the ticket was thrown out. Obviously nothing happened to the cop for lying, but if I hadn't done that it would have been my word against his. I don't really recall but I think I would have ended up with a $110 fine and 2 demerit points.
 

FullMotoJacket

Well-known member
Site Supporter
The roundtable with the former heads of the SIU and the following assessment of the SIU by Clayton Ruby starting @ 31:10 pretty much sums up the whole bad cop, sit at home with pay situation we're saddled with, with no sign of change any time soon.

 

justride

Well-known member

update
Calgary police Services
On Saturday, Feb. 13, 2021, an anti-mask protest took place at Chinook Mall where Calgary Police officers from the Public Safety Unit, Beat teams and the Diversity Resources Team were in attendance. The Diversity Resources Team were on scene to try and negotiate the protestors leaving the mall peacefully. In doing so, the officer in the video was successful in this peaceful negotiation. At the end of this negotiation, a handshake was offered and accepted. Another protester was nearby speaking into a bullhorn so the officer leaned in closer to hear what is being said. Shortly after this, the protestors dispersed and the situation is resolved without further disruption to the public. Our role at demonstrations such as these is to ensure public and officer safety, and for this reason, it is sometimes better to follow through with enforcement action post event. We commit to investigating the full scope of events in the coming days to determine what enforcement action may be taken.

update

 
Last edited:

Rob MacLennan

Well-known member
Moderator
Site Supporter
The roundtable with the former heads of the SIU and the following assessment of the SIU by Clayton Ruby starting @ 31:10 pretty much sums up the whole bad cop, sit at home with pay situation we're saddled with, with no sign of change any time soon.

The Cone of Silence clamped down on that one pretty quickly.
 

GreyGhost

Well-known member
Site Supporter
Toronto homicide detective stealing drugs from work. No criminal charges because it's a mental health issue and they justify it by saying they wouldn't charge someone that had OD'd. F that. This is much more equivalent to stealing from a pharmacy. Retired now.

Until they finally admit that the police apply a disgusting double standard to their members, people will continue to think they are scum (which is unfortunate for the good ones that get sprayed with the same *&^*).

It said its property and evidence unit was alerted to a suspicious locker entry by an individual, prompting an internal probe.

Worden was interviewed as part of that investigation and disclosed that he had taken opioids from the lockers for personal use, Gray said.

“Without the officer's disclosure and co-operation, the available evidence was not sufficient to sustain a criminal charge,” she said.

EDIT:

Meanwhile, this will probably affect criminal prosecutions (and I wouldn't be surprised if there are civil judgements we pay because of convictions that get unwound). So he was paid hundreds of thousands of dollars while breaking the law which causes all of his work to go in the garbage and then retires with pension for a job well done. Jeebus. Police pensions really need to be tied into being law-abiding (criminally, few care about HTA). Sure it could be a mental health issue, but instead of stealing drugs from work, get help, it's there for the taking. Otherwise know that your pension is on the line. Another case where there was almost no repercussions for actively violating criminal law while on duty.

So using the logic the police used in the article above, steal whatever drugs you want and if they pull you in for an interview just admit it and they will let you go. Absolutely disgusting.
 
Last edited:

Rob MacLennan

Well-known member
Moderator
Site Supporter
Toronto homicide detective stealing drugs from work. No criminal charges because it's a mental health issue and they justify it by saying they wouldn't charge someone that had OD'd. F that. This is much more equivalent to stealing from a pharmacy. Retired now.

Until they finally admit that the police apply a disgusting double standard to their members, people will continue to think they are scum (which is unfortunate for the good ones that get sprayed with the same *&^*).

It said its property and evidence unit was alerted to a suspicious locker entry by an individual, prompting an internal probe.

Worden was interviewed as part of that investigation and disclosed that he had taken opioids from the lockers for personal use, Gray said.

“Without the officer's disclosure and co-operation, the available evidence was not sufficient to sustain a criminal charge,” she said.

EDIT:

Meanwhile, this will probably affect criminal prosecutions (and I wouldn't be surprised if there are civil judgements we pay because of convictions that get unwound). So he was paid hundreds of thousands of dollars while breaking the law which causes all of his work to go in the garbage and then retires with pension for a job well done. Jeebus. Police pensions really need to be tied into being law-abiding (criminally, few care about HTA). Sure it could be a mental health issue, but instead of stealing drugs from work, get help, it's there for the taking. Otherwise know that your pension is on the line. Another case where there was almost no repercussions for actively violating criminal law while on duty.

So using the logic the police used in the article above, steal whatever drugs you want and if they pull you in for an interview just admit it and they will let you go. Absolutely disgusting.
So they don't have cameras on the evidence lockers? Card readers for cards that are tied to individuals? I find that hard to believe. Walking around my workplace, I could be tracked to certain doors, at certain times. Hell, they can show you what you were doing in any specific aisle at Wal-Mart.
 

Mikedezo44

Well-known member
Gotta love us friendly Canadians for not blowing this up and demanding change in the system. This case really takes the cake for me. How is this in any way similar to not charging a drug addict for overdosing? I guess by this logic a police officer can watch child porn on their work computer or drink and drive and not be charged either if they blame it on mental illness/addiction (which I'm sure still happens if they flash their badge at a ride program) Complete double standard. Makes me furious.

On a side note - "how to fix a drug scandal" on netflix is a great watch - drug crime lab employee getting high on evidence for years and all of the cases it affected and got thrown out due to evidence tampering.
 

FullMotoJacket

Well-known member
Site Supporter
So they don't have cameras on the evidence lockers? Card readers for cards that are tied to individuals? I find that hard to believe.

Believe it. I have a friend that got transferred to the Drug Enforcement "Gang" in his TPS Division. The stories he had were jaw dropping. He got out ASAP. You're either all in on the group's shenanigans, or you're the first through the door every raid. And none of them will risk their ass backing-up an "outsider"
 

GreyGhost

Well-known member
Site Supporter

backmarkerducati

Well-known member
Site Supporter
For the pension, they have paid into it out of pocket, more than 10% of their gross pay per year assuming it is the same as the other gov comparables. The government then matches this into the fund (it is defined benefit) not to them of course. I think if they are discharged of duties "dishonourably" like hopefully they will in these cases they should just get back what they put in plus inflation but now rolled into a LIRA. Get back what you put in, pension gone but you get your contributions back.

While it is a defined benefit it is not funded like many private company plans where the employee pays pittance and the company totally funds it. In some cases the employee pays nothing. Not in this case.

The stay at home pay needs to stop, specially as I believe their lawyers stretch things out to maximize this pay and to cloud the witnesses memory (and to keep padding pension). In the US they don't seem to have as many issues firing cops.....
 

FullMotoJacket

Well-known member
Site Supporter
Only three divisions in this case :/

Tip-of-Iceberg1.jpg
 

GreyGhost

Well-known member
Site Supporter
For the pension, they have paid into it out of pocket, more than 10% of their gross pay per year assuming it is the same as the other gov comparables. The government then matches this into the fund (it is defined benefit) not to them of course. I think if they are discharged of duties "dishonourably" like hopefully they will in these cases they should just get back what they put in plus inflation but now rolled into a LIRA. Get back what you put in, pension gone but you get your contributions back.

While it is a defined benefit it is not funded like many private company plans where the employee pays pittance and the company totally funds it. In some cases the employee pays nothing. Not in this case.

The stay at home pay needs to stop, specially as I believe their lawyers stretch things out to maximize this pay and to cloud the witnesses memory (and to keep padding pension). In the US they don't seem to have as many issues firing cops.....
I have no problem with them getting their contributions back (with growth). In no world should they ever be able to collect any employer contributions while literally being criminals while being paid to enforce the law. I agree pay while waiting for trial needs a huge revamp. It is disgusting.
 

GreyGhost

Well-known member
Site Supporter
Another giant waste of money due to police misconduct. The police remain "very proud" of their investigation even though no charges proceeded to trial due to their gross misconduct. That sounds like something to be proud of. Fack. How many millions were wasted on this?


York Regional Police say they are “extremely disappointed” that the Crown has decided to stay charges in a major organized crime investigation following allegations that police listened in on phone calls that were protected by solicitor-client privilege.

The 18-month-long investigation, dubbed “Project Sindacato,”

The investigation, which targeted a group accused of operating illegal backroom gambling dens, culminated in July 2019 with the arrest of 15 people, including Angelo Figliomeni, who investigators allege to be the head of the Figliomeni crime family.

At the time, police said $35 million worth of homes, sports cars, and cash were seized as part of the probe.

But Figliomeni’s lawyer, Michael Lacy, said charges have now been stayed in the case due to illegal conduct on the part of the investigators.

“What we alleged is that the police failed to comply with each aspect of the terms of their wiretaps and they were accessing this communication without court order,” Lacy told CTV News Toronto in an interview.

“We claimed this wasn’t just a mistake or a one-off — this was a consistent failure to comply with the terms of these court orders.”

“We remain very proud of this investigation and of the many members who worked so tirelessly throughout the 18 months it took to complete,” Const. Laura Nicolle said in a statement.
 

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