Have a new rider in family. I think I have a plan but can someone offer tips on getting started re: licensing and insurance? | GTAMotorcycle.com

Have a new rider in family. I think I have a plan but can someone offer tips on getting started re: licensing and insurance?

DJM

Well-known member
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Just got informed by our son that he wants a motorcycle and wants to do a road trip with some mates next summer after he graduates. He turns 25 next May and he's been driving since 16 and has a clean record. He's going to write his M1 tomorrow. Despite our apprehension we want to make sure he has access to the best training, so we're going to cover those costs. He'll pay for the bike and insurance.

So, current training plan is Aug 13th M2 course at the local College. Also going to sign up for SmartAdventures off-road course in September that we'll do together along with the SurvivingTheStreets course at TMP next May.

Here's where I get stalled. He can get a CBR125R right now for $2500 out the door and pay for M1 insurance on it with maybe 3 months of riding weather left. The other option is to wait until he turns 25 next May and get a CBR300 ABS for about $5500 OTD and insure it under his M2.

Thoughts?
 

Jay Alexander

Well-known member
Insurance between M1 and M2 will be the same. I'd say if really wants to ride right now, may as well get a bike sooner. Difference in premium in waiting will be nominal.
 

bigpoppa

Well-known member
Just got informed by our son that he wants a motorcycle and wants to do a road trip with some mates next summer after he graduates. He turns 25 next May and he's been driving since 16 and has a clean record. He's going to write his M1 tomorrow. Despite our apprehension we want to make sure he has access to the best training, so we're going to cover those costs. He'll pay for the bike and insurance.

So, current training plan is Aug 13th M2 course at the local College. Also going to sign up for SmartAdventures off-road course in September that we'll do together along with the SurvivingTheStreets course at TMP next May.

Here's where I get stalled. He can get a CBR125R right now for $2500 out the door and pay for M1 insurance on it with maybe 3 months of riding weather left. The other option is to wait until he turns 25 next May and get a CBR300 ABS for about $5500 OTD and insure it under his M2.

Thoughts?
the only weird part about this is getting a bike on an M1 license, he wont find a single underwriter who will insure him on an M1.

Wait till he gets M2 and then start shopping.

Also I wouldnt feel comfortable on a 125, its nice hes being responsible and smart, but I wouldnt feel safe on anything less than 250cc.
 

Evoex

The God
Site Supporter
Not true. There are some companies who will bind a policy, bit it's assuming of course the M2 will be obtained shortly

Yes you will likely have to provide proof of booking or at least a date or they’ll drop you.

Insure him as soon as possible, get that history rolling.
 

Mad Mike

Well-known member
Just got informed by our son that he wants a motorcycle and wants to do a road trip with some mates next summer after he graduates. He turns 25 next May and he's been driving since 16 and has a clean record. He's going to write his M1 tomorrow. Despite our apprehension we want to make sure he has access to the best training, so we're going to cover those costs. He'll pay for the bike and insurance.

So, current training plan is Aug 13th M2 course at the local College. Also going to sign up for SmartAdventures off-road course in September that we'll do together along with the SurvivingTheStreets course at TMP next May.

Here's where I get stalled. He can get a CBR125R right now for $2500 out the door and pay for M1 insurance on it with maybe 3 months of riding weather left. The other option is to wait until he turns 25 next May and get a CBR300 ABS for about $5500 OTD and insure it under his M2.

Thoughts?
Your selections suggest a small sport-tourer is what he's looking for. If that's the case, the best learner choices are Ninja 250/300 and Yamaha R3. Should get a low mileage clean bike out the door for $3-4k.

Pass on the 125, it's city only, not likely something he can ride with his mates.

Insurance will be expensive. Another option is a small 200-650 cc enduro. They are cheapest on insurance and will be happier than a 125 on the highway. On the small side a Suzuki DR 200, Yamaha XT (ther are a bunch more between 200 and 650.) At the larger end a KLR 650 is reasonably easy to handle and will be reasonable on insurance for a new rider. Another benefit is the KLR is suitable for beginnersd, but unlike the others its a big boys bike he can keep longer, he can also can tour on it. A nice used bike should be out the door between $3500-5k.

As for waiting till May, that won't save a lot, insurance is prorated for the riding season, set a renewal date for may next year, you'll only pay the higher rate for a few months.
 
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DJM

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Thanks for the replies. I'll talk to him tomorrow about other bike choices. Only reason we were leaning towards a cheap 125 is the chance of it getting dropped. Since the course starts Aug 13th we can see if there's an insurance company that will accept the M1 for now until he's eligible for the M2.
 

MacDoc

Well-known member
Site Supporter
Try
Christopher South, R.I.B. (Ont), CIP
Insurance Broker, SurNet Insurance Group Inc.
csouth@surnet.net
P: 416-546-8969
He'll steer you correctly.
Your son will almost certainly drop any bike so a smaller older bike would be suitable but what kind of trip is he thinking of with his mates and how big is he..as that makes a difference in a number of ways.

AFAIK Ontario insurance is cc based so the important first year will be less cost.
His driving record helps, over 25 helps.
Buying now gets that first year over while there is still riding time next year.
If he was just urban riding almost anything would work but if they want to do longer trips then something upright would be a better choice.
Nothing wrong with this if insurance is not too high and your boy is tall enough.
Lot of these been taken around the world and they tend to hold value if maintained.
I bought mine 10 years ago for $4000 and sold it this year for $2000 in Australia.

This is excellent and reliable ....took mine cross Canada in 2019.

this okay as well

More info helps
 
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Jay Alexander

Well-known member
Try

He'll steer you correctly.
Your son will almost certainly drop any bike so a smaller older bike would be suitable but what kind of trip is he thinking of with his mates and how big is he..as that makes a difference in a number of ways.

AFAIK Ontario insurance is cc based so the important first year will be less cost.
His driving record helps, over 25 helps.
Buying now gets that first year over while there is still riding time next year.
If he was just urban riding almost anything would work but if they want to do longer trips then something upright would be a better choice.
CC count is only part of the equation. The way premiums are set are done on a company-by-company basis, so they may vary by a lot.

I agree about possibly dropping the first bike. If you can find a deal on a smaller bike right now, might make sense. Getting a bike without getting gouged is a pain. I took what I could get myself, buying one late in the season, as it wasn't a ripoff.

In terms of insurance, if you can add the bike to your policy (and bundling with other policies), it may save a ton, as opposed to your son getting it alone.
 

mimico_polak

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I would consider the 125 for this season only as it’s a good learner and extremely forgiving. Then flip it at the end of the season for pretty much what you bought it for.

For next year and the trip I’d look at the 300-500 class from Honda or anyone else as it will do anything he’s able to throw at it.

I bought my first 125 in June/July and sold it for what I bought it for, and 4000km more in October.
 

DJM

Well-known member
Site Supporter
To answer some questions I'm with Riders Plus and my son is 6' with a 36" inseam. He has mentioned he really likes the Versys-X.
 

Mad Mike

Well-known member
Thanks for the replies. I'll talk to him tomorrow about other bike choices. Only reason we were leaning towards a cheap 125 is the chance of it getting dropped. Since the course starts Aug 13th we can see if there's an insurance company that will accept the M1 for now until he's eligible for the M2.
Fixing a dropped cbr125 is no cheaper than other small sport-styled bikes. Enduros are a little tougher, and the odd scar adds character.

The downside to a 125 is limited highway and distance capability. They are great urban and track bikes, but not so great if you want to venture out of the city. He'll want an upgrade shortly after getting the bike, so if you don't mind selling and shopping for another after a few thousand KM then it could be an option. The good news is that used entry-level bikes are cheap and easy to resell without taking a loss (as long as you don't trash them).
 

mimico_polak

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Site Supporter
To answer some questions I'm with Riders Plus and my son is 6' with a 36" inseam. He has mentioned he really likes the Versys-X.
Do not buy a 125 lol. He won't be comfortable on that at all. Even the CB300F/R won't be good. Maybe the 500X...maybe.

I took my old CBR250 for a spin a few weeks ago...felt like a circus bear on that thing compared to my 500X...and I'm 5'7".
 

Mad Mike

Well-known member
To answer some questions I'm with Riders Plus and my son is 6' with a 36" inseam. He has mentioned he really likes the Versys-X.
Most of the small ADVs are dressed versions of their small ST counterpart. There are some minor differences however it's mostly cosmetic -- same bikes with different clothes. Used ADV versions always seem to cost a lot more than their street sisters.

Honda CBR500=CBX500
Kawi Ninja 300=Versys-X
BMW G310=G310GS
KTM 390 Duke=390 ADV

Yamaha and Suzuki don't have a dog in this fight, their bikes are purpose-built as street or enduro.
 

Aens

Well-known member
A couple weekend/day courses, a few months of riding experience split over winter (while studying for final year of uni/college) is an awfully short timeline for prepping a road trip. Of course, the definition of a road trip is diverse as well as the type of riding they expect to do. I'd be more concerned about the road trip part and teaching stuff like basic maintenance and roadside repairs. How to lube a chain with no rear stand, how to bend back a lever, how to plug a tire, how to support a kick stand on a soft shoulder, how to not get your bike stolen from the parking lot of a seedy motel, etc etc.
 
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Robbo

Well-known member
Has your son been to any dealerships and sat on a bunch of bikes? Might be worth putting the time in.

Don’t buy a bike before he has passed the course. He needs to pass first. If for some reason he doesn’t, he won’t want to be looking at a bike in the garage that he can’t ride.


Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk
 

Mad Mike

Well-known member
Has your son been to any dealerships and sat on a bunch of bikes? Might be worth putting the time in.

Don’t buy a bike before he has passed the course. He needs to pass first. If for some reason he doesn’t, he won’t want to be looking at a bike in the garage that he can’t ride.


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If one can't pass the course, they should probably look at Spyders or a Presto card.
 

MacDoc

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KLR650 fits your son ...most else will feel cramped and they don't really suffer at all from a drop. He can get some off pavement practice too which will serve him very well. Very little maintenance ...the model has a 40+ year history.
An off pavement course, maybe Motopark at Chatsworth would really improve his riding skills for the street and give him confidence.
Versys is a good choice as well with much better on pavement performance. Lots of Vstroms around which will also fit and either I'd take across the country without concern.
 

Mad Mike

Well-known member
KLR650 fits your son ...most else will feel cramped and they don't really suffer at all from a drop. He can get some off pavement practice too which will serve him very well. Very little maintenance ...the model has a 40+ year history.
An off pavement course, maybe Motopark at Chatsworth would really improve his riding skills for the street and give him confidence.
Versys is a good choice as well with much better on pavement performance. Lots of Vstroms around which will also fit and either I'd take across the country without concern.
There is usually a big insurance premium on a twin 650ish ADV over a KLR or DR. The 30 year old kid I just helped get started was quoted 2x for insurance on a Vstrom over a Killer.
 

Baggsy

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Site Supporter
If one can't pass the course, they should probably look at Spyders or a Presto card.
Thing is, a significant number of people try riding and ultimately don't like it.

If you take the course first, you minimize the cost to dip your toe in.

If you buy a bike first, you may be selling it right away.
 

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