Have a new rider in family. I think I have a plan but can someone offer tips on getting started re: licensing and insurance? | Page 2 | GTAMotorcycle.com

Have a new rider in family. I think I have a plan but can someone offer tips on getting started re: licensing and insurance?

Soulcatcher668

Wait...... What?
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Thing is, a significant number of people try riding and ultimately don't like it.

If you take the course first, you minimize the cost to dip your toe in.

If you buy a bike first, you may be selling it right away.
Yup, you see lots of bikes for sale with under 100 kms on them, even more with just around 1000 kms.
 

mimico_polak

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Thing is, a significant number of people try riding and ultimately don't like it.

If you take the course first, you minimize the cost to dip your toe in.

If you buy a bike first, you may be selling it right away.
There’s also the feeling that you first bought a bike, then passed the course and even though you feel it’s not for you may force yourself to try it even though it’s not enjoyable since there’s already a bike in the garage.

To me that’s a dangerous game as it’s forcing oneself into a dangerous situation.
 
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DJM

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Wow thanks for all the input. As for riding he's wanted to get his license for a long time but he's been afraid to ask us, my mate was killed in a crash 4 years ago so he definitely didn't want to bring it up after that. Just came up in conversation as he was giving me a hand working on my bike. Mum's apprehensive but we're going to focus on training and preparation as much as possible.

He passed his M1 so now we wait for the M2 course to start Aug 13th. I'd let him practice for now with my bike but he's intimidated by it.
 

caje

Well-known member
To answer some questions I'm with Riders Plus and my son is 6' with a 36" inseam. He has mentioned he really likes the Versys-X.

Excellent choice!! I have a Versys X 300 and I love it. I think it's the ideal first bike since it can do everything well. Great on the road (performance of a Ninja 300), great for touring with the big gas tank and comfortable ergonomics, good off-road, and it comes with a luggage rack with is super practical.

I thought it would just be my "starter bike", but after trading it in for a Tenere 700 and then a Z900, I went right back to it and re-bought it since it's so versatile.
 

Homme007

Active member
Thing is, a significant number of people try riding and ultimately don't like it.

If you take the course first, you minimize the cost to dip your toe in.

If you buy a bike first, you may be selling it right away.

I would 2nd this opinion.... If he is looking to buy anyway... why don't you see if he actually likes riding first.

Honestly.. buying the CBR125 at $2500 and ride a few months.. is no different than paying a bit more for a CBR250/300... you may say its double the cost but from power perspective its "double" the bike... I would also agree with a few folks here that learn on a CBR125 in the training course.. but ride at least a 250cc on the street as you need to have enough pick up and speed to avoid stuff and get out of harms way. While I don't recommend going on to a 650cc+, I do believe a sufficently powerful bike is essential on the road.

With the course first and bike later approach.... As a parent, you can check up on him (discreetly) during the M2 Training to see how he's coping with the different bikes. Also... he may be set on a sports bike because that's the image that's probably burned into his head from *somewhere*, may be after trying a few different bike styles at the M2 Training.. he may change his mind to getting anything BUT a sport bike.

Anyway... I am a new rider too.. and got my M1/M2 a few months ago.. so I somewhat know what you/your son is going thru... I will say tho... as a young guy... there will be a lot of testosterone in his system... just be careful... don't let emotions take over. Getting cut off in a car, you can road rage the other mofo.. but in a bike.. you can out run the faqer.. but you will also carry a certain amount of danger on your back.. not worth it.

I am no authority in this as I am a new rider myself... but FWIW.... I would say the biggest advice from a fellow new rider are:

1) Know your mortality
2) Know that you are the smallest thing on the road and any mishap you will be at the short end of the stick
3) Know there is likely no small accidents with a bike -- i.e. there is no such thing as a fender-bender
4) Don't do stupid **** on the road (excessive speed, weaving, hotdogging)
5) Ride/Drive defensively (I know this is broad.. but that means look and concentrate on the road.. see far and anticipate dangers so you can avoid them)

Be safe and happy riding.
 
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Mad Mike

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Excellent choice!! I have a Versys X 300 and I love it. I think it's the ideal first bike since it can do everything well. Great on the road (performance of a Ninja 300), great for touring with the big gas tank and comfortable ergonomics, good off-road, and it comes with a luggage rack with is super practical.

I thought it would just be my "starter bike", but after trading it in for a Tenere 700 and then a Z900, I went right back to it and re-bought it since it's so versatile.
Too many people discount small cc bikes. I like them. Good on fuel, easy to handle, better performance than 95% of the cars on the road, and most will run 100,000km without major work.


I wish the big guys would bring more of their Asian bikes here, I'd be in for a $2000 150-200 cc city bike.
 

GreyGhost

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Too many people discount small cc bikes. I like them. Good on fuel, easy to handle, better performance than 95% of the cars on the road, and most will run 100,000km without major work.


I wish the big guys would bring more of their Asian bikes here, I'd be in for a $2000 150-200 cc city bike.
Sounds fun but when they brought here it would be far more.
 

Mad Mike

Well-known member
Sounds fun but when they brought here it would be far more.
They could do it, just not thru existing dealer network. If I was a product guy at Yamaha or Honda, I'd open a few stores similar to an Apple store that only sold scooters and small cc motorcycles.
 

DJM

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Thought I'd end this thread with an update, He passed his M2 exit course and we found a nice 2010 650 Versys with 32k that fits him well. The previous owner, a senior, was unable to ride it anymore due to health issues.

It's pretty farkled out, currently at a shop getting new tires and a safety. Even if he decides motorcycling isn't for him it's a bike that I'll ride so I'll probably keep it in the stable for a while. We plan to tear it down over the winter and go through all the bearings and do a valve check.
 

mimico_polak

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Thought I'd end this thread with an update, He passed his M2 exit course and we found a nice 2010 650 Versys with 32k that fits him well. The previous owner, a senior, was unable to ride it anymore due to health issues.

It's pretty farkled out, currently at a shop getting new tires and a safety. Even if he decides motorcycling isn't for him it's a bike that I'll ride so I'll probably keep it in the stable for a while. We plan to tear it down over the winter and go through all the bearings and do a valve check.
Nice congrats! Good choice of bikes. Always like that look of the VERSYS….especially in orange. Please tell me he got it orange!
 

oioioi

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Congrats
Neighbour has a 2016 versys and loves it.

Edit.
I have a battery tender to give away for free.
Nothing special but it works
Let me know if your son or you would want it.
 

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hedo2002

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If one can't pass the course, they should probably look at Spyders or a Presto card.
Similar course, (different if you take spyder only course.) but same road test for a spyder. I niow have a Spyder after 35 years on 2 wheels and mobility issues. Don't knock them until your over 60, and can't do 2 wheels anymore.
 

Renboy

Well-known member
I'm a bit late to the game since you've bought a bike already, but my suggestion would have been a racer5 or similar track oriented package. You can rent the bike, rent the gear, and actually learn how to ride. My son is still a few years from getting his license but he's done track and races in SOAR now. The weekend courses from colleges are great, no question, but they do not teach the limits of a bikes ability which is essential to avoid a left turner, dog, idiot with headphones, etc.
 

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