Enough of COVID...what are you doing to the house? | Page 3 | GTAMotorcycle.com

Enough of COVID...what are you doing to the house?

Mad Mike

Well-known member
Tear the front porch off the house. The last owners installed stone over a leak into a cold room. I wasn't that concerned, but the cold room is a common slab with the basement so a wet coldroom can affect the living space. Damn. Need to lift the stone, bust up the concrete, take out the concrete door sill, likely remove all supporting wood (cold room ceiling and rim joist under door), reframe, create new door sill, repour slightly sloped slab, install flat roof membrane, reinstall stone. Should look almost the same as now I have just spent a ton of time and money. I contemplated installing a porch roof over the door but that will be for a future time. I'll make sure there are transfer points where I can put columns.

Theoretically a pergola in the back yard, but that will probably be a future year too. Having the kids home really puts a hurting on available billable hours.

This stuff is so good you can make a fishing boat out of a screen door!
 

GreyGhost

Well-known member
Site Supporter
Couldn't you just peel the stone off, float some self-levelling grout on it and then install the membrane etc.? L
Not really. With the stackup they have already, the top of the stone is <1/2" below the top of the aluminum door sill. Terrible for snow. Tearing everything apart and starting again should let me buy back some height so I have a step down. As a quick fix, I could lift the stone, put down the membrane and relay stone. That would work some until I got around to doing it properly. With the half ass repair, it would be hard to fix the concrete door sill that got water in it and started to spall. If I wasn't a stucco wall, I would just move the door up, but it is and I don't want to re-stucco.
 

oioioi

Well-known member
Site Supporter
That was the first bathtub I've ever done... It's a little pricey, but this OS&B island bathtub drain makes this easy - the tailpiece slides into the drain fitting below, allowing final connection without access from below.

I did the same type of reno in the previous house we were in.
Got rid on builder shower. Get rid of the corner tub. New tiles, heated flooring, glass shower, new vanity, and stand alone bath tub.

Reno was done in January and house was sold in March. I didn't even use the tub at all, wife used it once.

In this house we need to do the same. Corner tub is out for sure and not putting any tub back in.
Kids washroom has a tub if anyone needs to soak. I don't care for bath so a shower will do.

My standalone tub came with a flexible drain hose that got attached to the plumbing. But I do like your set up here.

I was also reminded to get started on this project during this Covid break.
 

GreyGhost

Well-known member
Site Supporter
I did the same type of reno in the previous house we were in.
Got rid on builder shower. Get rid of the corner tub. New tiles, heated flooring, glass shower, new vanity, and stand alone bath tub.

Reno was done in January and house was sold in March. I didn't even use the tub at all, wife used it once.

In this house we need to do the same. Corner tub is out for sure and not putting any tub back in.
Kids washroom has a tub if anyone needs to soak. I don't care for bath so a shower will do.

My standalone tub came with a flexible drain hose that got attached to the plumbing. But I do like your set up here.

I was also reminded to get started on this project during this Covid break.
What is the plan for the giant floor space freed up by the tub? Our current master has a freestanding tub. It looks nice. We have never used it and probably never will. There is a tub in the basement for the kids and a hottub if we want to soak.
 

Lyndsay

Well-known member
Site Supporter
Not really. With the stackup they have already, the top of the stone is <1/2" below the top of the aluminum door sill. Terrible for snow. Tearing everything apart and starting again should let me buy back some height so I have a step down. As a quick fix, I could lift the stone, put down the membrane and relay stone. That would work some until I got around to doing it properly. With the half ass repair, it would be hard to fix the concrete door sill that got water in it and started to spall. If I wasn't a stucco wall, I would just move the door up, but it is and I don't want to re-stucco.
Got it. Was just thinking out loud. You might be able (want) to use something like this under the concrete. I had the deck over my cold room engineered and also the deck of my garage, so that I could use the space underneath it (22' X 22'). I don't have the specs with me, but could look them up. So far I don't have any cracks in either, and that is surprising, but the ridges seem to hold it together. It's a special item designed for this application. 1585233346321.png
 

oioioi

Well-known member
Site Supporter
What is the plan for the giant floor space freed up by the tub? Our current master has a freestanding tub. It looks nice. We have never used it and probably never will. There is a tub in the basement for the kids and a hottub if we want to soak.
The final configuration is still yet to be decided.
Either move the existing sink to that side where the tub was (near a window) and extended the corner shower to use up the space freed up by the current sink (2 person shower). OR leave the shower in same location/size and have 2 separate sinks.

Can't move the shower much as one corner of the washroom has a windows (doesn't play well with showers) and the other corner behind the door has a toilet and not enough space for a conformable shower.

A stand alone tube would probably never get used or very seldom. Making it not worth it with the amount of floor space it takes up.

I have also thought about taking over the walk in closet that's next to the washroom but than we are limited to a PAX (IKEA) type of clothes storage.
 

oioioi

Well-known member
Site Supporter
Got it. Was just thinking out loud. You might be able (want) to use something like this under the concrete. I had the deck over my cold room engineered and also the deck of my garage, so that I could use the space underneath it (22' X 22'). I don't have the specs with me, but could look them up. So far I don't have any cracks in either, and that is surprising, but the ridges seem to hold it together. It's a special item designed for this application. View attachment 42327
Isn't this the same or similar to what commercial units use for their flooring before the concrete gets poured? Also on their roof before all the roofing material goes on?
 

GreyGhost

Well-known member
Site Supporter
Got it. Was just thinking out loud. You might be able (want) to use something like this under the concrete. I had the deck over my cold room engineered and also the deck of my garage, so that I could use the space underneath it (22' X 22'). I don't have the specs with me, but could look them up. So far I don't have any cracks in either, and that is surprising, but the ridges seem to hold it together. It's a special item designed for this application. View attachment 42327
Wow, that is a good size room. My problem is my room is not large so specialty material costs can get out of control per sq ft. The room is only ~4'x9'. It will become an awesome wine cellar at some point after it is dry. The roof deck is not a bad idea though, I may talk to some construction friends and see if they have some off cuts.
 

oioioi

Well-known member
Site Supporter
Wow, that is a good size room. My problem is my room is not large so specialty material costs can get out of control per sq ft. The room is only ~4'x9'. It will become an awesome wine cellar at some point after it is dry. The roof deck is not a bad idea though, I may talk to some construction friends and see if they have some off cuts.
I would love to make the dumping pit under my garage into usable space. Either part of the basement or a workshop only accessible from the garage.

But that is a huge project and probably not worth the cost and time needed to get it done.
 

GreyGhost

Well-known member
Site Supporter
The final configuration is still yet to be decided.
Either move the existing sink to that side where the tub was (near a window) and extended the corner shower to use up the space freed up by the current sink (2 person shower). OR leave the shower in same location/size and have 2 separate sinks.

Can't move the shower much as one corner of the washroom has a windows (doesn't play well with showers) and the other corner behind the door has a toilet and not enough space for a conformable shower.

A stand alone tube would probably never get used or very seldom. Making it not worth it with the amount of floor space it takes up.

I have also thought about taking over the walk in closet that's next to the washroom but than we are limited to a PAX (IKEA) type of clothes storage.
Two person shower is very handy. Make sure you have a big hot water tank (or huge on-demand unit) or expect quick showers. At full steam, our shower is ~8 gpm.
 

nobbie48

Well-known member
Site Supporter
Putting drywall on a ceiling without one is a 2 person job, that's the difference, if you are working solo the lift will quickly pay for itself, otherwise with some help there are work-arounds.
Not true. Nail a 2 X 4 to the wall an inch below the joists, stick one end of the panel in the gap and lift. Prop with another 2 X 4 until you get a couple of screws in.
 

oioioi

Well-known member
Site Supporter
Two person shower is very handy. Make sure you have a big hot water tank (or huge on-demand unit) or expect quick showers. At full steam, our shower is ~8 gpm.
It probably wouldn't get used as the intended 2 person shower much anyways.
My time in a shower is quick. I don't need to stand there for half an hour thinking about what part of the body to wash next.
My wife does enjoy a semi-long shower.

Any experience with the on-demand tank less units?

I have heard mixed feelings about them.
 

Trials

Well-known member
Not true. Nail a 2 X 4 to the wall an inch below the joists, stick one end of the panel in the gap and lift. Prop with another 2 X 4 until you get a couple of screws in.
You can do all that on your own with your arms up over your head like that? 8 or 9 foot ceilings? You are good!
 

GreyGhost

Well-known member
Site Supporter
It probably wouldn't get used as the intended 2 person shower much anyways.
My time in a shower is quick. I don't need to stand there for half an hour thinking about what part of the body to wash next.
My wife does enjoy a semi-long shower.

Any experience with the on-demand tank less units?

I have heard mixed feelings about them.
I hate them for almost every reason. Not everybody agrees with me.
  1. Initial cost is much higher
  2. You must flush them yearly (or more often if your water sucks) to remove deposits or service life plummets. To make this easier, you should install a flush kit (more $). I highly doubt most people spend the time and money to do this.
  3. If you want a trickle of warm water (for instance to rinse dishes), you can't get it. It needs sufficient flow to fire the heater.
  4. When you call for hot water, you get warm water that was sitting in the pipes, then a slug of cold water, then heated water. Everytime. You do the dance until it stabilizes. You need to tell everyone that showers in your house about the dance so they don't fry themselves.
  5. Max flowrate is ~5gpm at 70F temp rise for a gas unit. 70F may not be enough temp rise for you, therefore useful flow rate is even lower. Incoming water is ~45F, normal shower temperature is 105F, so you need a 60F temp rise if just using hot water. At a 70F temp rise, you get to add very little cold water to supplement the flow out of the heater.
  6. Way more complicated than a tank. More likely to fail.
  7. If the power goes out, you have no hot water. On a tank you have hot water for days if you are careful (and if you are lucky enough to have a non-power vent tank, you have infinite hot water with no power, that's how we kept our house warm during the long xmas power outage a few years ago).
  8. The only real upside for most people for the on-demand is it uses up less space in the basement.
 

Trials

Well-known member
Practice trials. You can ride a bike over a garden shed and you think it is impossible to put up a sheet of board by yourself?
Yes, I tried it before. I can drywall a ceiling with the assistance of one additional person, or a drywall lift,
anything short of that is a total waste of time and energy. We are still talking ceilings here, walls are way easy.
 

oioioi

Well-known member
Site Supporter
Yes, I tried it before. I can drywall a ceiling with the assistance of one additional person, or a drywall lift,
anything short of that is a total waste of time and energy. We are still talking ceilings here, walls are way easy.

One could say that riding a bike while standing on its foot pegs the entire tire is also waste of energy.🤷‍♂️
 

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