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COVID-19 potential restrictions on riding?

Jayv

Well-known member
Site Supporter
I rode to work today, workplace is considered an essential service(which is a bit of a joke). I don't see what the difference is between riding and driving to work as far as Covid lockdown is concerned.
 

PrivatePilot

Ironus Butticus
Site Supporter
On the bike you are ~5 times more likely to end up in the hospital. Very little covid problem. Potential healthcare problem.
If we start nitpicking to that extent however there's lots of risky things that we also shouldn't be allowing right now...like...*cough*, construction. Fun fact: 1 in 5 workplace fatalities are in construction, and it's also one of the top industries for workplace injuries.

I'll fully admit I'm pulling a bit of a red herring argument here, but just saying...
 

Jayv

Well-known member
Site Supporter
On the bike you are ~5 times more likely to end up in the hospital. Very little covid problem. Potential healthcare problem.
So we should all be driving Volvo's. ??No essential workers should be taking public transport or take out food if you want to look for potential healthcare problems.

That 5 times stat has no weight with the current traffic situation.
 

GreyGhost

Well-known member
Site Supporter
If we start nitpicking to that extent however there's lots of risky things that we also shouldn't be allowing right now...like...*cough*, construction. Fun fact: 1 in 5 workplace fatalities are in construction, and it's also one of the top industries for workplace injuries.

I'll fully admit I'm pulling a bit of a red herring argument here, but just saying...
And I think having construction running right now is a terrible idea. Mattamy has shut down construction. My buddy with a construction company says they are down to ~40% of the sites running and just wants Douggie to pull the plug.

This idiotic keep everything half going is still economically brutal while needlessly spreading the virus. Take a few weeks of a total shutdown and then re-assess whether to allow some things to start again. As long as almost everything is essential, people won't take it seriously and continue to go on with their lives as they see fit. If there was actually leadership that said "stay home" and backed it up with appropriate guidance/legislation, things would be a lot different. How can anyone take this seriously if dry cleaners can stay open? Who doesn't have enough suits to get them through two weeks? Especially two weeks where almost nobody is supposed to be in the office? That list made everyone think this is a joke.
 

Wingboy

Well-known member
Moderator
Site Supporter
So we should all be driving Volvo's. ??No essential workers should be taking public transport or take out food if you want to look for potential healthcare problems.

That 5 times stat has no weight with the current traffic situation.
Yes.It's a bad situation.
 

ifiddles

Well-known member
according to this website for Ontario, over 35,000 tests have been conducted...24,000 + came back negative...667 were positive...13 have passed away...again, maybe i'm naive or wishful thinking, but these numbers are not that bad...let the flaming begin LOL
 

GreyGhost

Well-known member
Site Supporter
according to this website for Ontario, over 35,000 tests have been conducted...24,000 + came back negative...667 were positive...13 have passed away...again, maybe i'm naive or wishful thinking, but these numbers are not that bad...let the flaming begin LOL
The peak is seven to eight weeks out. If we were at the top with those numbers, I am on your team. Eight weeks of exponential growth is terrifying (unless you manage to do it in your portfolio in which case I will salute you in your diamond castle).
 

Trials

Well-known member
I know what you guys are saying, but I don't think I have ever got on a motorcycle and started thinking about needing a hospital. When does that happen?
 

ifiddles

Well-known member
i'll agree that we haven't peaked, but my brother sent me an article saying the next few days are critical because of the people that came back from vacation a week or two ago...it also states how our numbers are skewed because they're not testing people like they should be to see if they're now negative after having been tested positive because they don't have enough test kits...

as far as the potential for accidents, there's no one on the roads in comparison to normal daily traffic, so the chances of getting into one with another vehicle are hopefully smaller (mind you, with less people on the road, more drivers might not be paying full attention or even less than they would if there was more traffic)...i can see single vehicle accidents happening because the guys and gals that are going out might take advantage of less traffic and ride faster or more reckless than they normally would...

here's the article... Next few days critical for social distancing: Ontario health officials - 680 NEWS
 

Evoex

The God
Site Supporter
according to this website for Ontario, over 35,000 tests have been conducted...24,000 + came back negative...667 were positive...13 have passed away...again, maybe i'm naive or wishful thinking, but these numbers are not that bad...let the flaming begin LOL
We're only circling the real situation, likely 1 to 2 months away.
 

oioioi

Well-known member
Site Supporter
And I think having construction running right now is a terrible idea. Mattamy has shut down construction. My buddy with a construction company says they are down to ~40% of the sites running and just wants Douggie to pull the plug.

This idiotic keep everything half going is still economically brutal while needlessly spreading the virus. Take a few weeks of a total shutdown and then re-assess whether to allow some things to start again. As long as almost everything is essential, people won't take it seriously and continue to go on with their lives as they see fit. If there was actually leadership that said "stay home" and backed it up with appropriate guidance/legislation, things would be a lot different. How can anyone take this seriously if dry cleaners can stay open? Who doesn't have enough suits to get them through two weeks? Especially two weeks where almost nobody is supposed to be in the office? That list made everyone think this is a joke.

Yes construction is another great example of a "essential service", especially residential construction. ;)

We all know that most if not all construction jobs (of any level, residential, government, roads etc) are delayed or running behind schedule. What is another month or two going to do if the sites are closed down? Nothing really in the grand scheme of things.

The only type of construction that should be allowed is sites where they are in final stages (completion) of the project within the next two weeks. At the same time, all other sites should be given the same two weeks to bring it up to a livable state (residential) or to a point where the rest of the project can be put on hold once these few items are taken care of (pouring that last bit of concrete or installing doors/fences to secure the site).

Just as infrastructure drives the economy these construction workers also rely on the rest of the services on the essential list.
They need public transit to get to the job site or they need to drive there. Their car/bus brakes down and now they need to take it to the mechanic. The mechanic ran out of toner ink to print his invoice so he needs Staples/Best Buy to buy the toner. so on and so on.

If they can't shut down some of the big players, don't expect the little guys to listen and stay home.

But just as they did not want to admit that the blue plates were faulty they won't want to admit that they should have locked down more services right from the get-go. At that point it might be too late.
 

GreyGhost

Well-known member
Site Supporter
Yes construction is another great example of a "essential service", especially residential construction. ;)

We all know that most if not all construction jobs (of any level, residential, government, roads etc) are delayed or running behind schedule. What is another month or two going to do if the sites are closed down? Nothing really in the grand scheme of things.

The only type of construction that should be allowed is sites where they are in final stages (completion) of the project within the next two weeks. At the same time, all other sites should be given the same two weeks to bring it up to a livable state (residential) or to a point where the rest of the project can be put on hold once these few items are taken care of (pouring that last bit of concrete or installing doors/fences to secure the site).

Just as infrastructure drives the economy these construction workers also rely on the rest of the services on the essential list.
They need public transit to get to the job site or they need to drive there. Their car/bus brakes down and now they need to take it to the mechanic. The mechanic ran out of toner ink to print his invoice so he needs Staples/Best Buy to buy the toner. so on and so on.

If they can't shut down some of the big players, don't expect the little guys to listen and stay home.

But just as they did not want to admit that the blue plates were faulty they won't want to admit that they should have locked down more services right from the get-go. At that point it might be too late.
Now, there is knock on for this too. I was talking to a residential builder this week that is quaking in his boots. The interest clock keeps running, mortgages are going to be harder to come by (especially if one or both of the mortgagees is unemployed when the dwelling closes) and prices are going to dip. There is a good chance a shutdown bankrupts some sites (many builders spin up a corporation for each site to limit liability/cost & income tracking/make a clean break after the site is finished). Again, it comes back to JT. Pull the plug on everything the federal govt can touch. No interest charged, no interest collected.
 
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Krime

Well-known member
Site Supporter
i'll agree that we haven't peaked, but my brother sent me an article saying the next few days are critical because of the people that came back from vacation a week or two ago...it also states how our numbers are skewed because they're not testing people like they should be to see if they're now negative after having been tested positive because they don't have enough test kits...

as far as the potential for accidents, there's no one on the roads in comparison to normal daily traffic, so the chances of getting into one with another vehicle are hopefully smaller (mind you, with less people on the road, more drivers might not be paying full attention or even less than they would if there was more traffic)...i can see single vehicle accidents happening because the guys and gals that are going out might take advantage of less traffic and ride faster or more reckless than they normally would...

here's the article... Next few days critical for social distancing: Ontario health officials - 680 NEWS
Here’s the thing about the positive test stats... for every person that tests positive, there are an exponential more that have been effected by that person and either gone undetected so far or have mild symptoms and didn’t reach out for testing but are still contagious and passing it on to others. This cycle continues. With 50% community spread transmission (as opposed to imported from travel), the reality is that Canada is already behind this thing and we’re going to see huge spikes in the coming days/weeks... which is why I’m still confused we are not in Lockdown yet.
 

MacDoc

Well-known member
Site Supporter
Tell him that by email. I did

PM@pm.gc.ca

Again, it comes back to JT. Pull the plug on everything the federal govt can touch. No interest charged, no interest collected.
Damn banks are being greedy pigs especially CC interest at 20% when rates are zero or negative ......they will just "defer it". :mad:
 

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