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Coronavirus

r3r3r3

Well-known member
It still blows me away there are no temporary farm workers in Canada that qualify for the jobs.
The TFWers on farms are doing backbreaking work busting their ass all day in a hot field. Good luck finding any Canadian willing to do that sorta work. IIRC there are also certain crops that require specialized labor to harvest correctly. The work is so seasonal you could never maintain a workforce to support that - I believe they bounce around NA/SA for weeks at a time as things come to harvest.

The TFW program does have its flaws but makes sense for certain scenarios. It gets a bad wrap from the farmers forcing people into slum like living conditions. You also have ****** companies like Tim Horton's abusing it because they don't want to pay market value for Canadian workers - e.g. when Alberta was at the peak of their oil boom the average entry level wage was significantly higher than the minimum wage and Tim's feels they are entitled to an endless stream of minimum wage drones.
 

Trials

Well-known member
I took a job through canada manpower once :| they took 30 % of my wages and I had to pour molten lead into ceramic hydro line insulators. That job actually paid more then the roofing job of 1 dollar per bundle. :cautious:my heart bleeds for the farm workers
 

Brian P

Well-known member
Moderator
Site Supporter
I remember registering for a summer job through Manpower once. They matched me up to a strawberry-picking job. All of the other people who actually worked there were ... a little shorter and lighter than me. (Okay, A LOT shorter and probably half my weight. And with a skin tone less susceptible to sunburn.) After the morning, it was becoming apparent that this backbreaking job was going to work out to so little pay for the day that it wasn't even going to cover the gas for my Honda Civic to drive to the farm and back. I forget how much I had earned, probably something like $2 (the regular workers could do 5 or 10 times what I could); I took that, left, and never came back. As a double bonus, if you quit a job that Manpower matched you to, you went to the back of the line, basically ensuring that you wouldn't get another one. This would have been following the early-1980s recession ... jobs weren't easy to come by.

I doubt if they were allowed to take someone's physical characteristics into account when matching them to a job ... that would be discriminatory ... even though it's got to be among the most important factors with something like that.
 

Evoex

The God
Site Supporter
My only experience with Manpower was back in like 2000. Went to a car auction and just drove vehicles in a circle.

Great day!
 

GreyGhost

Well-known member
Site Supporter
I remember registering for a summer job through Manpower once. They matched me up to a strawberry-picking job. All of the other people who actually worked there were ... a little shorter and lighter than me. (Okay, A LOT shorter and probably half my weight. And with a skin tone less susceptible to sunburn.) After the morning, it was becoming apparent that this backbreaking job was going to work out to so little pay for the day that it wasn't even going to cover the gas for my Honda Civic to drive to the farm and back. I forget how much I had earned, probably something like $2 (the regular workers could do 5 or 10 times what I could); I took that, left, and never came back. As a double bonus, if you quit a job that Manpower matched you to, you went to the back of the line, basically ensuring that you wouldn't get another one. This would have been following the early-1980s recession ... jobs weren't easy to come by.

I doubt if they were allowed to take someone's physical characteristics into account when matching them to a job ... that would be discriminatory ... even though it's got to be among the most important factors with something like that.
A lot of the lower wage temp workers just hang out on the curb in front of manpower/labor ready. A van drives up, says $x/day, I need y people and they all hop in. Save losing 30% of your money and they get a job almost every day.
 

Green Meenie

Well-known member
I remember registering for a summer job through Manpower once. They matched me up to a strawberry-picking job. All of the other people who actually worked there were ... a little shorter and lighter than me. (Okay, A LOT shorter and probably half my weight. And with a skin tone less susceptible to sunburn.) After the morning, it was becoming apparent that this backbreaking job was going to work out to so little pay for the day that it wasn't even going to cover the gas for my Honda Civic to drive to the farm and back. I forget how much I had earned, probably something like $2 (the regular workers could do 5 or 10 times what I could); I took that, left, and never came back. As a double bonus, if you quit a job that Manpower matched you to, you went to the back of the line, basically ensuring that you wouldn't get another one. This would have been following the early-1980s recession ... jobs weren't easy to come by.

I doubt if they were allowed to take someone's physical characteristics into account when matching them to a job ... that would be discriminatory ... even though it's got to be among the most important factors with something like that.
Just like you, me and a buddy got a job picking strawberries one summer in high school. It was sunny and around 30 degrees that first day. We also left at lunch and went swimming in Lake Ont., which was close. We were first world kids and couldn't hack the brutal picking work in that heat. Good learning experience though!
 

mimico_polak

Well-known member
Site Supporter
The EU announced 14 countries from which travellers can enter the EU from 1 July. Canada is on the list.
Dammit! How the f am I going to cancel my trip now. Was really hoping (selfish I know) for an extension to the ban.
 

ifiddles

Well-known member
just found this on Facebook from Johns Hopkins University...some really interesting stats and graphs...definitely don't want the borders to reopen between us and the US any time soon...don't even want my hubby delivering to their Buffalo yard after seeing this...

 

mimico_polak

Well-known member
Site Supporter
Most airlines are allowing free changes or cancellations even if the original ticket bought was not flexible. You won't get a refund - you'll get a credit towards future flight.
As long as I don’t lose the cash outright I’m good. If a voucher is what I can get I can make that work as the wedding we were going to got postponed by a year.
 

Green Meenie

Well-known member
As long as I don’t lose the cash outright I’m good. If a voucher is what I can get I can make that work as the wedding we were going to got postponed by a year.
Call the airline's customer service and ask what their policy is for cancelling due to Covid-19 concerns. The policies change frequently but you may indeed be able to get a travel credit with that airline that is good for a year or more. Just be prepared to wait for a long time on hold to get through to a live person. Staffing numbers are way down and inquiries are way up.
 

nobbie48

Well-known member
Site Supporter
just found this on Facebook from Johns Hopkins University...some really interesting stats and graphs...definitely don't want the borders to reopen between us and the US any time soon...don't even want my hubby delivering to their Buffalo yard after seeing this...

COVID-19 is like a seed that someone planted in their garden, not knowing what it was. At this point all we know are some general facts about what encourages growth, which is substantial. Is it a perennial or annual? Is there a weed killer for it that doesn't kill the host plant (Disinfectant)? Side effects of the COVID and the cures are unknown.

Does it have genetic mutation powers like rubella or scarlet fever?

The light-bulb at the end of the hallway hasn't been made yet, never-mind screwed in or turned on.

The biggest social / economic problem is we don't know how long the disease will last. Nothing is harder on business or nerves than uncertainty.
 

nobbie48

Well-known member
Site Supporter
With no end in sight, how long can we sustain the lock-down restrictions?

If this drags out five years or more can we continue to bail out non essential businesses or do we throw the nail salons and vape shops under the bus now?

What is an essential business? I'd write off tat shops, window tints, coffee shops, nail salons etc. Let them survive on their own.

It would mean taking a USA attitude of let the weak die. Yeah, survival of the fittest doesn't sound as callous.

As a guy, I mentioned a nail salon but what about auto detailing and other moto bling.

Fast food joints weren't on every corner a generation ago. If they close where do the minimum wage earners go and what about the pension plans that have invested in McD's and the like? (Not easy is it)

Groceries are essential but if everyone had to really tighten the belt they could close the pop and chip aisles and most of the cereal aisle.

As Justin works this through, not missing an opportunity to throw around cash, it's sounding more and more like the Titanic racing through the fog in iceberg alley.
 

GreyGhost

Well-known member
Site Supporter
With no end in sight, how long can we sustain the lock-down restrictions?

If this drags out five years or more can we continue to bail out non essential businesses or do we throw the nail salons and vape shops under the bus now?

What is an essential business? I'd write off tat shops, window tints, coffee shops, nail salons etc. Let them survive on their own.

It would mean taking a USA attitude of let the weak die. Yeah, survival of the fittest doesn't sound as callous.

As a guy, I mentioned a nail salon but what about auto detailing and other moto bling.

Fast food joints weren't on every corner a generation ago. If they close where do the minimum wage earners go and what about the pension plans that have invested in McD's and the like? (Not easy is it)

Groceries are essential but if everyone had to really tighten the belt they could close the pop and chip aisles and most of the cereal aisle.

As Justin works this through, not missing an opportunity to throw around cash, it's sounding more and more like the Titanic racing through the fog in iceberg alley.
The other way to look at it is what value is there is propping up many categories of business that may not be viable for an extended period? For instance, let nail salons close for now and find alternative employment. When this mess is eventually resolved they can reopen. Paying rent for a year or more on a business with no customers makes very little sense.
 

Brian P

Well-known member
Moderator
Site Supporter
Restrictions "of some sort" can be sustained for a long time - and will be with us for a long time.

Went out for dinner last night, saw some friends for the first time in three months ... eating on a patio isn't a problem for us but it's a good thing winter is still months away.

Barber shops and nail salons can survive ... they just have to operate differently. My understanding with the Kingston situation is they tried to do business as normal.

Indoor sporting events, concerts, conferences, or anything else with active indoor crowds are a long way off.
 

nobbie48

Well-known member
Site Supporter
The other way to look at it is what value is there is propping up many categories of business that may not be viable for an extended period? For instance, let nail salons close for now and find alternative employment. When this mess is eventually resolved they can reopen. Paying rent for a year or more on a business with no customers makes very little sense.
Farmers cull herds and plow under crops that aren't worth harvesting. Is this any different?
 

Trials

Well-known member
.... My understanding with the Kingston situation is they tried to do business as normal. ...
The way I heard it a **** load of dizzy females from an infected part of Toronto went there to have their nails done, because everywhere local was closed.
 
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