Any GTAM'ers own an electric vehicle? | Page 210 | GTAMotorcycle.com

Any GTAM'ers own an electric vehicle?

r3r3r3

Well-known member
Biggest issue I see with Telsa is how they have entered into a cycle of “hype” to generate the necessary cashflow they need to sustain themselves. Matt Farah talks about this extensively in his “smoking tire” podcast. Essentially Telsa has to generate hype ($$$) for a new model just to pay for the production of what they are currently offering.

They treat concept cars like final production models. They have really only ever mass produced 3 models but they are now up to 5 promised future cars that are completely unrelated? Cyber truck, model Y, new roadster, semi-truck, and I think there was talk of a Model S update.

Selling features that are not a reality. They have been offering the full autonomy package for 3 years at a charge of something like $7000. You literally could have leased a Model S, paid for this package, and will never see it before your lease is up.

Telsa roadster - $40,000 down payment, no real timeline. All you’ve done is give Telsa an open term interest free loan. Claim a bunch of impressive stats, don’t show any functional model, cash the check.

Cybertruck – Musk loves to flaunt how they have over 250,000 preorders for the vehicle. Telsa now goes to their investors to get that several billion dollar loan they really need – “look at how many people want this!” . In reality it’s a fully refundable $100 deposit. Not to mention all the automotive engineers that highlight that the current design would never pass modern safety standards nor could they ever produce the current spec at their entry price. (Where is the promised $35,000 Model 3?)

I think Telsa has been riding the wave of being first to market and there will be a market correction eventually. Will they completely fail? Highly unlikely, but It will be very interesting to see when the German/Japanese automakers really start to focus on EV over the next few years. You often hear the claim that the big automakers are just sitting idle on EV tech. The reality is I think they have a much better idea of the game than Tesla does. They realize they can’t just push products to market and understand the supply chains, service, long term reliability etc. aspects that are involved which is where Tesla fails miserably. E.g. my old boss who waited 5 months for a new front bumper on his S that the repair shop could never get to fit like factory. drivers side seat foam collapsing / seat stitching opening after 3 years, etc. They have a ton of fit & finish issues on all of their models and this only seems to get worse as they ramp up their production.
 

K20EF8

Well-known member
I think Telsa has been riding the wave of being first to market and there will be a market correction eventually. Will they completely fail? Highly unlikely, but It will be very interesting to see when the German/Japanese automakers really start to focus on EV over the next few years. You often hear the claim that the big automakers are just sitting idle on EV tech. The reality is I think they have a much better idea of the game than Tesla does. They realize they can’t just push products to market and understand the supply chains, service, long term reliability etc. aspects that are involved which is where Tesla fails miserably. E.g. my old boss who waited 5 months for a new front bumper on his S that the repair shop could never get to fit like factory. drivers side seat foam collapsing / seat stitching opening after 3 years, etc. They have a ton of fit & finish issues on all of their models and this only seems to get worse as they ramp up their production.
The idea that Tesla is going to dominate traditional automakers and make them obsolete is nothing more than a Tesla fanboy idiot dream.
They are one large battery recall away from disaster.
Tesla made $1000 per vehicle sold last year. The average truck sale in the US nets a $10000 profit.
Ford alone sold over 2x as many trucks in the US last year as Tesla sold vehicles worldwide.

They have had one profitable quarter in 10 years. VW sold more cars the first two weeks of this year as Tesla will likely sell the whole year.
Yet Teslas market valuation is now almost double, thanks to fanboy hype and short covering.
Anyone other than shorts buying at this price level should get their heads checked.
 

SunnY S

Well-known member
Site Supporter
"All stock-market investments are a bet on the future. And it's clear that investors see Tesla as the future."
 

GreyGhost

Well-known member
Site Supporter
"All stock-market investments are a bet on the future. And it's clear that investors see Tesla as the future."
Or in a much more likely scenario, they were betting on tesla to fail (which I also think is a bad idea) and now they are trying to cover their positions before they end up bankrupt.
 

Brian P

Well-known member
Moderator
Site Supporter
TSLA looks like a speculative bubble inflated by short-covering. "the market can stay irrational longer than you can stay solvent"
 

PrivatePilot

Ironus Butticus
Site Supporter
You guys still reading Sunny's drivel?

He's one of those guys who's fanboi fanaticism is so far into batshit crazy territory that you actually want the company they relentlessly fawn over to fail.
 

SunnY S

Well-known member
Site Supporter
You guys still reading Sunny's drivel?

He's one of those guys who's fanboi fanaticism is so far into batshit crazy territory that you actually want the company they relentlessly fawn over to fail.
Kind of like what happened to your much ballyhooed Volt?
 

GreyGhost

Well-known member
Site Supporter
Control arms are supposed to stay attached to your car right?



reports of many more owners that experienced the same issue. They identify themselves there as Benjamin Lam, Luis Alicea, Joe Dropkin, Guy Barzilai, Sasha Anis, Russel Wong, Nouphone Vongphakdy, Mike Schultz, Brandin Abbott, Douglas Birk, David Abrams, Brett Ryan, E.T. Micha, Nauman Jaliawala, Brian Fukumoto, Mark Cabacungan, and Darren Fonseca – on that tread alone.



Massoud said the issue was caused by the "passenger front wheel" ejecting from the car. He reported having felt a pop – just like Cover did – and seeing the wheel escape before hitting a tree.
 

Brian P

Well-known member
Moderator
Site Supporter
Wow. (I've been involved in a fair number of projects for building and assembling suspension parts over the years ... including some for Tesla ... that bolt wasn't us, though)

Do you see any evidence of Loctite on that bolt? It's not uncommon for bolts in that application to come with a blue, green, or red coating on the threads ... Loctite. I don't see any. (If present, this is something that the bolt supplier provides already in place on the bolt ... it's not like someone on the assembly line has to drip it on the bolt before installing it. It's not done that way on the assembly line any more.) The other common way to keep those bolts from loosening is to use a nut that has intentionally deformed threads, but you can't tell that in the photo. None of the auxiliary thread-locking methods will work if the bolt is not tightened correctly ... wonder how, or if, they error-proof or log that. I know how it's done elsewhere ...

Those bolts are usually (on any other vehicle) difficult to remove ... and they're supposed to be.
 

GreyGhost

Well-known member
Site Supporter
I'd better go out and remove the Bose sound system, backup camera, and heated seats from my Volt, since I didn't pay for them, the previous owner did.

:ROFLMAO:
It is shocking that they are "auditing" vehicles in the wild and then de-contenting them when it is quite obvious that there is a problem with their master database used to conduct the audit.
 

PrivatePilot

Ironus Butticus
Site Supporter
It is shocking that they are "auditing" vehicles in the wild and then de-contenting them when it is quite obvious that there is a problem with their master database used to conduct the audit.
It's nice they've got the manpower to do petty things like this whilst people still wait months for their cars to get basic body repairs at the dealers after fender benders.
 

GreyGhost

Well-known member
Site Supporter
It's nice they've got the manpower to do petty things like this whilst people still wait months for their cars to get basic body repairs at the dealers after fender benders.
They're a tech company. They have lots of people to poke at the software, obviously not nearly enough on the mechanical side of the car.

I could easily see Tesla switching to a model where any options are one-owner only. As soon as the car changes hands, you are back to base model and have to pay again to upgrade (maybe a declining scale based on age?). They recently re-wrote their warranty coverage and included (paraphrased) "this warranty coverage supercedes all past coverage" and then did their best to disappear all older documentation related to warranty coverage from the web. Unfortunately, that's not legal. The coverage that was documented the day of the sale sticks with a vehicle forever. Again, a tech company selling mechanical devices.

EDIT:
Come to think of it, could de-contenting increase the value of a car in certain circumstances? What is worth more, a P100 degraded to 75 kWh (so you know the battery pack has had a hard life) or a P75 with a 75 kWh capacity? Without a solid history of the car or physical inspection to see the larger pack (maybe weigh the car?), I could see that happening.
 

PrivatePilot

Ironus Butticus
Site Supporter
Unfortunately, that's not legal. The coverage that was documented the day of the sale sticks with a vehicle forever. Again, a tech company selling mechanical devices.
You sure about that? Our Ioniq EV has a warranty that states that the original owner gets a significantly longer battery warranty versus any secondary owners in the future.

I guess that's not a "complete rewrite" with it superseding anything pre-existing, but it does seem to indicate that any warranty can be adjusted between original to subsequent owners.

As for any automaker removing options and making a new owner pay for them all over again, that's just dirty and will not go over well with the public - just look at his this story is going viral and the response to it. Tesla will have to eat a lot of fecal matter on this one in the end, and they'll probably relent in the end when lawyers get involved. IMHO it's as bad as the government here collecting sales tax on a vehicle over and over and over again every time it changes hands. There's nothing we can do about that except gripe, but there's something consumers CAN do about a car company that shares those sorts of morals - just not buy their product, and badmouth it at that.
 

GreyGhost

Well-known member
Site Supporter
You sure about that? Our Ioniq EV has a warranty that states that the original owner gets a significantly longer battery warranty versus any secondary owners in the future.

I guess that's not a "complete rewrite" with it superseding anything pre-existing, but it does seem to indicate that any warranty can be adjusted between original to subsequent owners.

As for any automaker removing options and making a new owner pay for them all over again, that's just dirty and will not go over well with the public - just look at his this story is going viral and the response to it. Tesla will have to eat a lot of fecal matter on this one in the end, and they'll probably relent in the end when lawyers get involved. IMHO it's as bad as the government here collecting sales tax on a vehicle over and over and over again every time it changes hands. There's nothing we can do about that except gripe, but there's something consumers CAN do about a car company that shares those sorts of morals - just not buy their product, and badmouth it at that.
But the Tesla fanboi's are all in. In that kind of market, you can do whatever you want and still lose very few customers (see Apple for the last decade). The one's griping and not buying were probably already unlikely to buy as there are objectively some better options that a well-researched consumer would likely choose.
 

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