Any GTAM'ers own an electric vehicle? | Page 211 | GTAMotorcycle.com

Any GTAM'ers own an electric vehicle?

PrivatePilot

Ironus Butticus
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Fair enough, but in the greater scheme of things, Tesla is still a niche automaker that still needs to drastically expand it's scope if it's ever going to be considered one of the big boys.

Negative coverage like this that moves them into "fanboy" territory isn't going to help, especially with the inherent hatred some people have towards EV's right out of the gate. There's a lot of people that just love to **** on EV's for everything and everything. This is just fodder for those sorts.
 

GreyGhost

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You sure about that? Our Ioniq EV has a warranty that states that the original owner gets a significantly longer battery warranty versus any secondary owners in the future.

I guess that's not a "complete rewrite" with it superseding anything pre-existing, but it does seem to indicate that any warranty can be adjusted between original to subsequent owners.

As for any automaker removing options and making a new owner pay for them all over again, that's just dirty and will not go over well with the public - just look at his this story is going viral and the response to it. Tesla will have to eat a lot of fecal matter on this one in the end, and they'll probably relent in the end when lawyers get involved. IMHO it's as bad as the government here collecting sales tax on a vehicle over and over and over again every time it changes hands. There's nothing we can do about that except gripe, but there's something consumers CAN do about a car company that shares those sorts of morals - just not buy their product, and badmouth it at that.
I am not a lawyer. The things I read were wrt to removing coverages provided by the warranty in force when you bought the car. If the book says that the battery warranty changes with a change in ownership you knew (or could have/should have known) that prior to handing over your money. If they retroactively removed rust coverage (especially with well-documented cases of new cars being delivered rusty) that is no-bueno.
 

Brian P

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You sure about that? Our Ioniq EV has a warranty that states that the original owner gets a significantly longer battery warranty versus any secondary owners in the future.
But that was declared at the outset in the original warranty documentation. It's not a change that was unforeseeable to customers.
 

GreyGhost

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"Eight years in, the Model S continues to impress."

Beaten by a 8 year old design, lolz. Wait until the 2nd gen 3 motor "S" comes out....

So they compared the S to the most expensive Taycan and then declared it a victor because it was cheaper? Boo C+D. Adding option packages to any car (and especially Porsche) has never been a way to chase value.

I would have loved it if they tried to compare vehicles at approximately the same price and see who wins (probably S, but who knows). The C+D cop out of "Some spreadsheet fiddling suggests that the finishing order wouldn't have changed had we pitted the Tesla against the far slower $105,150 Taycan 4S." doesn't work for me. The 13 1/4 mile and 0-60 runs after run two would still have walked away from the S (seconds faster). Now most people are using their E-car for repeated 1/4 mile runs but that was the test C+D chose so they should live with it.
 
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FullMotoJacket

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Too funny. On virtually ever car made you get a nice, long warning your control arms are on their way south (creaking, clunking, vibration, vague steering). With a Tesla you get a *pop*, OH SH!T, TREE instant failure. This stuff writes itself.
 

GreyGhost

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Too funny. On virtually ever car made you get a nice, long warning your control arms are on their way south (creaking, clunking, vibration, vague steering). With a Tesla you get a *pop*, OH SH!T, TREE instant failure. This stuff writes itself.
Even with all the creaking and clunking, you just end up with crap handling, you still dont get "*pop*, OH SH!T, TREE".
 

Brian P

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Someone on another forum had a fair point regarding the design of that suspension link. That type of attachment point is ordinarily used for attaching dampers and the like, with the bolts oriented roughly in line with the expected direction of applied force. Used in the way Tesla did it and with the orientation shown, the bolts that secure the little tie-bar to the subframe are in single shear, which is more sensitive to loosening. The bracket should have been rotated 90 degrees and bolted sideways into the subframe, not bolted to the bottom of it. Having something attached with bolts in single shear isn't completely against the rules, but it's not the best choice.

The other choice - which is more conventional for a control-arm attachment point - is to eliminate the little tie-bar, replace it with a steel tube through the middle of the bushing, weld a U-shaped bracket onto the subframe with holes in it, and bolt it through the bracket and inside the tube inside the bushing in the control arm. This places the bolt in double-shear with no relative motion of what it's clamping - both the bolt and the nut are clamping around the U-shaped bracket and that in turn clamps the tube inside the bushing in place.
 

K20EF8

Well-known member
"Eight years in, the Model S continues to impress."

Beaten by a 8 year old design, lolz. Wait until the 2nd gen 3 motor "S" comes out....

Only thing it really beat it on was the price and lets be real here Porsche was never going to price a capable car like the Taycan Turbo S anywhere near $100K, it would eat Panamera sales.
The Porsche is better looking inside and out, had almost the same range, better handling, could run off multiple 1/4 miles in a row, whereas the Tesla was running Civic 1.5T econocar times by its 5th 1/4.
 

SunnY S

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So they compared the S to the most expensive Taycan and then declared it a victor because it was cheaper? Boo C+D. Adding option packages to any car (and especially Porsche) has never been a way to chase value.

I would have loved it if they tried to compare vehicles at approximately the same price and see who wins (probably S, but who knows). The C+D cop out of "Some spreadsheet fiddling suggests that the finishing order wouldn't have changed had we pitted the Tesla against the far slower $105,150 Taycan 4S." doesn't work for me. The 13 1/4 mile and 0-60 runs after run two would still have walked away from the S (seconds faster). Now most people are using their E-car for repeated 1/4 mile runs but that was the test C+D chose so they should live with it.
Hear hear, if I was a rival automaker, I'd be quaking in my boots right now.

The Tesla although 8 model years old, relatively unchanged, and is realistically, more like a 10 year old design, if you factor in development years.

10 years!!!! in the automotive world, that is an eternity!

With the rapid advances in development and technology, Porsche, in my opinion, esp with its commanding price tag and renowned engineering prowess, the Taycan should have been heads and shoulders above the Tesla.

I would understand if we were talking about GM here, but we are talking a high end brand here.


The fact, FACT, that Tesla got it so right, and still, a highly esteemed auto magazine declares it a winner of a high end Porsche, is EPIC and highly remarkable.




Long live Telsa, Haters can keep on hating.
 
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LBV

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Porsche did crap the bed with the Taycan's mileage and when that came out is when Tesla stock shot up again.

I sometimes wonder if when Tesla released all their patents to the public a few years back if they didn't hold onto some key information. I'm sure Elon had a nice chuckle when the EPA released the Taycan's rating.

I do give them credit though as they're staying in the lead STILL.

My sister wanted a Model Y but when I told here they have no dealerships to service it and some of the horror stories on waiting for repairs she changed her mind. She's now got a Mach-E on order instead.

I'll go fully electric once my 2017 Volt is due for a change, but still would be shying away from Tesla unless things change on their service protocols.
 

Brian P

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Found this.


Disclaimer: I know who is building the automation for the welding lines for that vehicle's body and frame. I'm not involved in that project, but I am involved with the same company on a different project. I'm not 100% sure they are going to meet their start-of-production date (late 2020) ... but it shouldn't be far off. They are serious about this.

They are not going after the heavy-duty truck market - they are going after the mainstream pickup-truck market, who uses the vehicle mostly as a car, and occasionally for light-truck things or light off-roading.

They have been hiding their validation prototypes in plain sight for a couple of years under uncamouflaged Ford F150 bodyshells.
 

GreyGhost

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Article on the bolt. Admittedly the author is a fan, but it's good to see some real world long term info.

 

PrivatePilot

Ironus Butticus
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Article on the bolt. Admittedly the author is a fan, but it's good to see some real world long term info.

I see a Bolt still in our future some time down the road. My wife doesn't like the design but I'm cool with it, so it would definately be mine.

Reality is the only reason I'm keeping my Volt right now is for the fact it still has the gas fallback. We are headed to Baltimore in a few weeks for a getaway and we are of course taking it versus the Ioniq. The biggest reason is because the Ioniq is only a midrange EV (which of course we knew going in and were cool with), but it would require 4 or 5 charging stops because of that this time of year, and I'm not interested in that. Gas it is.

But something like a Bolt on the other hand with it's drastically longer range, 1 charging stop plus maybe a quick top up somewhere, and we're there. Since we usually stop for at least a 1 hour lunch somewhere anyways, it's of zero inconvenience. At that point I'd be comfortable giving up the "safety blanket" the Volt presents.
 

PrivatePilot

Ironus Butticus
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They are serious about this.

They are not going after the heavy-duty truck market - they are going after the mainstream pickup-truck market, who uses the vehicle mostly as a car, and occasionally for light-truck things or light off-roading.
Interesting video, thanks for posting.

Looks like they've got their **** together. Should be interesting in the next few years. Still not a huge fan of that headlight design though. ;)
 

LBV

Well-known member
Article on the bolt. Admittedly the author is a fan, but it's good to see some real world long term info.

I had read that already and liked this:
"In the slightly less than three years I’ve had the 2017 Bolt, it cost us less than $75 in maintenance. Maintenance for the first 150,000 miles (241,402 km) was to rotate the tires and change the cabin filter — that’s it. No yearly maintenance, no hidden costs. This has been the cheapest car I have ever owned"
 

PrivatePilot

Ironus Butticus
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I don't know why more car makers don't use the skateboard approach. It's always seemed like such a waste to have entirely different underpinnings/drivetrain for different models when a single skateboard powertrain option could simply be mated to different bodies placed on it, simply altering things like ride height and mounting points to fit different cars vs trucks, etc. With electric propulsion it would seem like, done right, even wheelbase could be altered on the skateboard as needed. Yes, I know some cars are built on shared platforms (Volt and Cruze for example), but there's a lot more that aren't when it seems like it realistically could be done all whilst saving a lot of money.
 

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