What's your plans (or dreams?) in retirement? | GTAMotorcycle.com

What's your plans (or dreams?) in retirement?

PrivatePilot

Ironus Butticus
Site Supporter
And now, for something completely off topic...Another thread put it in my head again, being a little less than 20 years out from retirement myself (hopefully 15 or maybe a little less if all goes right) assuming our kids are not both perpetually in university or living at home.... but that's another story.

Once that big day comes, what's your dream? Or do you already have a plan? All you already retired guys, piss off, no gloating. :p

My wife and I have chatted on and off over the years about buying a motorcoach, emptying out the house and liquidating things, renting it out (bonus free income), and living life on the road, going where-ever the wind (and weather) takes us. We towed our various trailers well in excess of 150,000KM in the 15 years we were seriously RV'ing we know the lifestyle fits us, and in 2008 when we spent 5 weeks with our 5th wheel travelling to the west coast and back and we LOVED it. Our little taste of the RV life going out to Gaspe again in our little rental trailer a few weeks ago reminded me how much I miss that nomad lifestyle. Being able to decide that you're bored with the local area and just starting the engine and ending up somewhere completely new and fresh to see and explore is amazing and liberating.

That next 15ish years is going to be like pulling teeth for me at my current employer however, but I'm about 3-5 years out from being one of the top 2 or 3 people on the seniority list (after 23 or so years there by that point) so I'm hoping I'll finally get to start slurping some of the gravy by then and life will be a little easier. I've tasted the gravy a few times over my 20 years there and liked it, but every time I get a mouthfull something happens (company merger with a seniority dovetail, massive layoff due to loss of work, change of the nature of the work, restructuring, etc etc etc) and I seem to get knocked off the ladder back into the gruel again. ;)
 

Evoex

The God
Site Supporter
I figure in my 60s ill just keep jumping out of airplanes until the inventible happens. Until then, see as much of the world as i can.

I actually have no plans for retirement, i would be way too bored. I'll keep grinding away at something.
 

Mad Mike

Well-known member
And now, for something completely off topic...Another thread put it in my head again, being a little less than 20 years out from retirement myself (hopefully 15 or maybe a little less if all goes right) assuming our kids are not both perpetually in university or living at home.... but that's another story.

Once that big day comes, what's your dream? Or do you already have a plan? All you already retired guys, piss off, no gloating. :p

My wife and I have chatted on and off over the years about buying a motorcoach, emptying out the house and liquidating things, renting it out (bonus free income), and living life on the road, going where-ever the wind (and weather) takes us. We towed our various trailers well in excess of 150,000KM in the 15 years we were seriously RV'ing we know the lifestyle fits us, and in 2008 when we spent 5 weeks with our 5th wheel travelling to the west coast and back and we LOVED it. Our little taste of the RV life going out to Gaspe again in our little rental trailer a few weeks ago reminded me how much I miss that nomad lifestyle. Being able to decide that you're bored with the local area and just starting the engine and ending up somewhere completely new and fresh to see and explore is amazing and liberating.

That next 15ish years is going to be like pulling teeth for me at my current employer however, but I'm about 3-5 years out from being one of the top 2 or 3 people on the seniority list (after 23 or so years there by that point) so I'm hoping I'll finally get to start slurping some of the gravy by then and life will be a little easier. I've tasted the gravy a few times over my 20 years there and liked it, but every time I get a mouthfull something happens (company merger with a seniority dovetail, massive layoff due to loss of work, change of the nature of the work, restructuring, etc etc etc) and I seem to get knocked off the ladder back into the gruel again. ;)
I retired on my 50th birthday. Travelled a bit, then did nothing for a bit. After a 2 years I ran out of things to do and began to find the days very boring - the only folks available for weekday rides were Southern Cruisers my parents age.

After 3 years I was going crazy so I went back to work doing something I love doing. Money isn’t what I’m used to, but zero stress, 7 hour days, and gobs of vacation time make it all OK.

I’ll try again in a few years when a few of my friends are retiring. Might add my first Harley to the stable so I fit in on the Southern Cruiser rides. I plan to retire from employment and winters at the same time.
 

J_F

Well-known member
Site Supporter
the idea of a planned date to stop work
and then do what? go fishing? play golf?
meh...that sounds like work

I'm on a sabbatical now, summers riding
winters down south...will do this for a few years
didn't want to wait until the typical retirement age
too many people make that time vs money gamble and lose

eventually will go back to work at something
was thinking about growing heirloom mushrooms
roasting and grinding high quality coffee
maybe get into some bike flipping
 

Brian P

Well-known member
Moderator
Site Supporter
I'm semi-retired at 53. My line of work lends itself to this, it doesn't have to be all or nothing. My target is 3 days of work a week, maybe 4 in the winter to keep occupied when I can't ride. The pandemic cut into the semi-retirement nest egg but it's still enough to get by considering that working 3 days a week is enough to pay the bills. I won't be moving to a McMansion but I don't care.

I have 6 bikes to play with.

I'm going to continue regional roadracing as long as I can, to keep myself sharp and provide motivation to stay in shape.

In 2018, I did a trip to Italy with a tour group which turned out to be a great bunch, several days of riding around Tuscany on a rental street bike and a day on the track at Mugello with the Ducati Riding Experience.

In 2019, same tour organiser, and a few of the same group, did a similar thing, 5 days in Australia on a rental street bike and 2 days on a rental BMW S1000RR at Phillip Island.

This year's plans have been deferred to next year; Troy Corser's Racing School Europe at Motorland Aragon.

Portimao is on the wish list, and the tour group organiser has said that interest has shot up with MotoGP just finishing their weekend there.
 

ToSlow

Well-known member
Site Supporter
Three more yrs. and I'm done. I'll be 60. My wife and i are planning on traveling a bit hopefully the world will be somewhat normal then. We bought a motorhome this yr. so we will be using it as much as we can.
 

crankcall

Well-known member
Site Supporter
I'm not sure I'll ever fully retire, I have a few very small ventures that I enjoy and would keep me occupied. I'll exit corporate on a day to day in about 5 yrs or so.
We both really enjoy travel, but different types, I go wander around in the jungle and she loves cruise ships. Either way travel is stupidly expensive most of the time.
Wife has a countdown app on her phone, she wont work 11 seconds past that bell.

I'll spend a lot of time on the boat, take one south for awhile , go back to AZ for an extended period. We will get a lot of mileage in while health allows. We have a variety of friends , all with different retirement plans and meeting them around the globe for brief interventions in thier retirement dreams
 

Pegassus

Well-known member
Site Supporter
LOL I have these idiots working in my company who are PAST 65 and still working (and collecting double wages). I asked one of them when he planned in truly retiring, he said in 4 years, he will be 71. What a bunch of losers.

I already got my union credits to fully retire, but at my age I still have to wait many long years more. I'm retiring at 55. I'm moving out of Canada and retiring in Central America. I already scoped out the places and its a paradise. Cute young women everywhere, sunny 280 days of the year, hot and humid everyday. New townhouses are only $40,000 dollars with all the amenities that a Canadian townhouse has. I'm planning in having a pick-up truck and 2 motorcycles, a trailer and a Sea*Doo. There are NO property taxes over there, so after spending the $40k for a townhouse I don't have to worry about anything except water, hydro and internet. I already scoped all that too.

This is what it will cost me to live over there monthly wise;

rent = $0
water = $6 a month
hydro = $18-$25 a month (got this number from homes with heavy energy use, such as convenience stores with 2 fridges and lights on all the time)
natural gas for oven = $11 and lasts 2 months (there are no gas pipelines)
fuel = $50 a week x 4 = $200/month.
Maid/cleaning lady $120/month
Food = $300/month

Total price to live there monthly = $662

My reirement payout a month will be over $4,500 monthly. I will be living there with only 20% of that amount.


I'm not leaving Toronto permanently, my kids will be adults by then and I would come and spend some time with them every 9 months.
 

Lightcycle

Motorcycle Nomad
Site Supporter
It's looking to me like traditional retirement (work till 65 then stop and collect CPP, draw down RSPs) is not as popular a model as it was 20-30 years ago.

A lot of folks around me who are at retirement age are still working at something, either due to the increased costs of living or just boredom. As for retirement plans, these morph over time, especially the younger you are. I don't think a 40-year old is going to know what his 65-year old self will want to do with his spare time, knees and energy-level notwithstanding. I look at my interests back when I was 25 and think, "Stupid kid!"

Personally, for me, I took time off mid-career to do what most people wait till 65 to do - extended travels around the world. My own belief is that time is more valuable now than it will be tomorrow. Too many stories of people who waited too long and then health, energy and attitude all conspire to route your life into a direction not of your own choosing.
 

Mad Mike

Well-known member
I'm not sure I'll ever fully retire, I have a few very small ventures that I enjoy and would keep me occupied. I'll exit corporate on a day to day in about 5 yrs or so.
We both really enjoy travel, but different types, I go wander around in the jungle and she loves cruise ships. Either way travel is stupidly expensive most of the time.
Wife has a countdown app on her phone, she wont work 11 seconds past that bell.

I'll spend a lot of time on the boat, take one south for awhile , go back to AZ for an extended period. We will get a lot of mileage in while health allows. We have a variety of friends , all with different retirement plans and meeting them around the globe for brief interventions in thier retirement dreams
I like Arizona and California the best. Cool and dry, no bugs, 300+ sunny days a year. Down side is CA is pricy and AZ doesn’t have big water.

Florida for me. Inexpensive, great healthcare, lots of safe communities and the have ocean. Downside is bugs.
 

Mad Mike

Well-known member
It's looking to me like traditional retirement (work till 65 then stop and collect CPP, draw down RSPs) is not as popular a model as it was 20-30 years ago.

A lot of folks around me who are at retirement age are still working at something, either due to the increased costs of living or just boredom. As for retirement plans, these morph over time, especially the younger you are. I don't think a 40-year old is going to know what his 65-year old self will want to do with his spare time, knees and energy-level notwithstanding. I look at my interests back when I was 25 and think, "Stupid kid!"

Personally, for me, I took time off mid-career to do what most people wait till 65 to do - extended travels around the world. My own belief is that time is more valuable now than it will be tomorrow. Too many stories of people who waited too long and then health, energy and attitude all conspire to route your life into a direction not of your own choosing.
That’s good advice. I was fortunate to work in a field that let me hop around the world for 25 years collecting memories.

After a few zillion flights and hotel stays I have zero appetite for destination travel. I have a few places I want to see or see again and no desire to ever live outside North America.
 

油井緋色

Well-known member
Site Supporter
No kids. Bought condo. Living at 40% of our financial capacity. Investing 40% and spending the other 20% on stupid **** like gaming.

Give me another 2 decades, worst case scenario, and I'll retire playing video games in VR as "Angry Asian Grandpa Wrecks kids in iRacing." Whether or not that's me smashing into kids because of suck or passing them isn't something I'm sure of yet lol

I likely won't ride again sadly. Cost is just too insane with the route I went a few years ago.
 

nobbie48

Well-known member
Site Supporter
LOL I have these idiots working in my company who are PAST 65 and still working (and collecting double wages). I asked one of them when he planned in truly retiring, he said in 4 years, he will be 71. What a bunch of losers.

I already got my union credits to fully retire, but at my age I still have to wait many long years more. I'm retiring at 55. I'm moving out of Canada and retiring in Central America. I already scoped out the places and its a paradise. Cute young women everywhere, sunny 280 days of the year, hot and humid everyday. New townhouses are only $40,000 dollars with all the amenities that a Canadian townhouse has. I'm planning in having a pick-up truck and 2 motorcycles, a trailer and a Sea*Doo. There are NO property taxes over there, so after spending the $40k for a townhouse I don't have to worry about anything except water, hydro and internet. I already scoped all that too.

This is what it will cost me to live over there monthly wise;

rent = $0
water = $6 a month
hydro = $18-$25 a month (got this number from homes with heavy energy use, such as convenience stores with 2 fridges and lights on all the time)
natural gas for oven = $11 and lasts 2 months (there are no gas pipelines)
fuel = $50 a week x 4 = $200/month.
Maid/cleaning lady $120/month
Food = $300/month

Total price to live there monthly = $662

My reirement payout a month will be over $4,500 monthly. I will be living there with only 20% of that amount.


I'm not leaving Toronto permanently, my kids will be adults by then and I would come and spend some time with them every 9 months.

I know a couple of people that retired to Panama. One with good results the other not so much but that was due to out-of-touch expectations.

They were around David / Boquette. It takes a while to get used to the local mentality but there are groups of ex-pats to associate with.

Labour is cheap down there. One person I know banged up the corner of his pickup and the labour to fix it was a couple of hundred dollars. A friend up here did the same and it was a couple of grand. I had kicked around sending a classic car down there for the restoration work and bring it back for final touches. Never got around to it.

One caution, fraud is the national sport.

My retirement is not having a schedule. Work on what I want to when I want to. The thing I enjoyed most about solo touring was not having to accommodate other people's need to eat, pee or smoke.
 

regder

Well-known member
Site Supporter

Mad Mike

Well-known member
dont forget hurricanes and crazy people everywhere
150 people killed by hurricanes in the last 20 years, or about 1 of every 3 million people. Chances of freezing to death are higher in Ontario.

No more crazies than here (it's a republican state -- you won't see nearly much in the way of violent protests, riots, looting and such).

Can't forget the obscene humidity.
Yup you do get that, but only in the summer. I plan to be bobbing around Lake Ontario in my dinghy that time of year.
 

bigpoppa

Well-known member
150 people killed by hurricanes in the last 20 years, or about 1 of every 3 million people. Chances of freezing to death are higher in Ontario.

No more crazies than here (it's a republican state -- you won't see nearly much in the way of violent protests, riots, looting and such).

Now do property damage, willing to bet its 100x higher than any riot
anywhere on the gulf coast aka 'hurricane alley' is going to be a shitshow, and its going to get worse each year.

And yes, more crazy, infamously so

Maybe its the sun, or the cocaine, maybe both 🤷‍♂️
 

J_F

Well-known member
Site Supporter
Florida is kind of boring for riding though
but agree there are some nice communities

I'd be getting a weapon and stay current at the range
nickel plated Colt 45 ACP kinda turns my crank
 

hdsomeday

Well-known member
Site Supporter
My wife says I have to work until I die. My bank balance says the same thing.

My wife doesnt care, she is still working so me being home wouldnt bother her in the least. Its the bank and CRA that wont let me.
 

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