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What's with romaine?

nobbie48

Well-known member
Site Supporter
It seems to be a regular occurrence to have the stuff recalled / pulled from shelves etc and it has to be costing someone million$.

I know a lot of produce is grown under irrigation and it has been suggested that the workers use the irrigation ditches as toilets. Livestock may in some cases do the same through runoff.

We away wash all our produce but assume that either doesn't work or the concern is for the people that don't.

So what is happening in the supply chain to have this happen.
 

250R-ICE

Well-known member
Site Supporter
You would be surprised on what they use for fertilizer. E.g. the left over by product from the waste water treatment plants gets put back into farmers fields. Also known as sewage sludge. Not sure if this is the cause but I wonder sometimes. Maybe it shows up in lettuce more easily than other foods that are grown such as corn, wheat etc....
 

crankcall

Well-known member
Site Supporter
corn and wheat, grain fields, are often fertilized with waste treatment plant leftovers but its plowed into the soil. In California and other places its often water from the plant that's used as irrigation, some vegetables retain the e coli better than others.

Its scary how many resteraunts still have a cesar salad on the menu. Not this month thanks.
 

TwistedKestrel

King of GTAM
Site Supporter

Mad Mike

Well-known member
They use sewage for fertilizer.
Yes they do. I lived in the strawberry capital of California for years, miles of strawberry fields surrounded my house. The portable johns are emptied onto the fields once the picking is finished.

I recently found out this is standard practice in Ontario too. I was looking at a property near Minden that had several sewage holding tanks. The realtor didn't know the pump out cost, but he knew the pump out company and gave me their name. I called to check costs, $250 summer because we can dump on farm fields, $400 in winter because we can't.

Yikes i said!
 

LiNK666

Well-known member
Few years ago I switched to spinach. Prefer it better to lettuce. Can't eat lettuce anymore. Romaine or iceburg
 

nobbie48

Well-known member
Site Supporter
Yes they do. I lived in the strawberry capital of California for years, miles of strawberry fields surrounded my house. The portable johns are emptied onto the fields once the picking is finished.

I recently found out this is standard practice in Ontario too. I was looking at a property near Minden that had several sewage holding tanks. The realtor didn't know the pump out cost, but he knew the pump out company and gave me their name. I called to check costs, $250 summer because we can dump on farm fields, $400 in winter because we can't.

Yikes i said!
I don't feel like typing the whole story out and it also might get a good person in trouble but cottage country sewage legislation is a total nightmare. It's controlled by twits in the city that don't know where water comes from other than a tap and don't know where it goes when you flush.
 

Baggsy

Well-known member
Site Supporter
Please don't eat the daisies.
 

beverage

Well-known member
We recall and discard far more food than we need to for the sake of erring on the side of caution. Granted, lettuce would be a hard product to rid of e.coli because it's difficult to clean and consumed raw so a recall is reasonable, but many of the bacteria that are the basis for a recall are killed with heat. For instance, cooking raw meat to proper temperatures, and properly sanitizing your work space after handling raw meat, would allow you to ignore most recalls of products that will be cooked. The problem is that the CFIA (rightfully) has no confidence that the general public will follow good food handling practices in the home.
 

Trials

Well-known member
Problem is reported as being rooted in California :| have you ever seen what passes for fresh water in the state of California?
 

nobbie48

Well-known member
Site Supporter
Problem is reported as being rooted in California :| have you ever seen what passes for fresh water in the state of California?
Apparently part of the new trade deal is that we have to accept their standards for dairy and they allow 2 1/2 times the amount of crap. Yeah I can understand what passes for fresh.
 

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