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The Most Important Motorcycle of 2021 ?

Mad Mike

Well-known member
Seeing a pattern here

maybe the youngsters are smarter than we give them credit for and dont see the point of buying a bike and paying for insurance for only being able to ride for half a year?
Possible explanation. But then what about the 2-a-year multi-thousand dollar vacations, BMWs, and $2500/mo 350sq' downtown studio apartments? Money is always a factor, but I think risk aversion and the entry costs are still the biggest obstacles -- in the great scene of things a small city bike's cost could be less if it offsets some of the operating costs of a car AND the rider can get some fun/joy out of the riding experience.
Perhaps better marketing by MC companies? Drop that entry cost on 1 bike in their lineup to $2500. I doubt it would cannibalize sales of bigger bikes, would add a bit to the service business, and more importantly put more riders on the path to bigger bikes they can sell down the road.

I know Honda tries this a few years ago -- I'm guessing it was somewhat successful based on the number of CBR125s that are still sought after. They all have the bikes, India's MC emission standards are tougher than Canada's (1.0 HC+NOX vs 1.4 in Canada) and they sell a lot of small bikes there. I suspect Yamaha and Honda bikes sold there would need little or nothing to be compliant for sale in Canada.

If the bike makers are listening... I'll buy one of you make it available for a $1000 premium over the price you sell them in India.
 

george__

Well-known member
I know lots of friends under 40 who would like to own a motorcycle but living expenses are so insane they forgo this expensive hobby.

The cost to start scares most of them away..

Bike gear fees
M1/M2/M fees
Riding school fees

Then they see insurance rates and cry 😭

So I doubt a cheaper motorcycle will do much..
 
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xrljoel

Well-known member
I know lots of friends who would like to own a motorcycle but our living expenses are so insane they forgo this expensive hobby.
"By George, I think you've got it!" Sorry.

But I do think you're absolutely correct. Current costs of living, particularly housing and related things have become so out of scale compared to incomes.
 

gsxr guy

Well-known member
Not sure I actually "punched a hole in the sky" but jumping out of a plane was a bigger rush than anything I have ever experienced on two wheels. Not even close.

Where were we? Oh yeah motorcycles yawn.
Have you tried getting big air on a sport bike? It's close!
 

Lightcycle

Rounder of bolts, Dropper of tools
Site Supporter
I know lots of friends under 40 who would like to own a motorcycle but living expenses are so insane they forgo this expensive hobby.

To MM's point, your friends under 40 probably think nothing about upgrading to the latest $2000 smartphone every year, amirite?

Young people today just have different priorities. And motorcycling is not one of them.
 

bigpoppa

Well-known member
To MM's point, your friends under 40 probably think nothing about upgrading to the latest $2000 smartphone every year, amirite?

Young people today just have different priorities. And motorcycling is not one of them.
Most of them pay for those monthly anyway, if only more manufacturers could do what honda/bmw/ducati(VW)/harley does with all that in house financing
 

Wingboy

Well-known member
Moderator
Site Supporter
Pretty cool. But i like to think in terms of something anyone can do.
 

Lightcycle

Rounder of bolts, Dropper of tools
Site Supporter
no...motorcycles and cellphones arent good investments

You don't say...

Motorcycling is not suffering from a lack of interest from young people due to lack of manufacturer financing.

People of all ages have found a way to dig themselves into a deep hole regardless of whether there's manufacturer financing, bank financing or credit card financing. There will always be institutions that are more than willing to help those individuals out by offering them a bigger shovel to dig that hole. And those types aren't going to let the difference of a few % points deter them from making that smartphone/sports car/motorcycle purchase.

"Oh, you don't offer manufacturer financing? Well then I won't make that purchase then" said no financially-illiterate person ever.

Neda was only able to buy her dirtbike at the dealership because the previous guy that put money down on that bike, his financing fell through due to bad credit. He was eventually able to find alternative financing - at 23% APR...

I wonder how on earth he got such a poor credit rating?
 

bigpoppa

Well-known member
Ya, the young people have it so very tough trying to afford those basic living expenses...
yeah man, people had horse and buggies in the 70s, dontyaknow?
 

Lightcycle

Rounder of bolts, Dropper of tools
Site Supporter
yeah man, people had horse and buggies in the 70s, dontyaknow?

Not saying old people didn't buy stupid sh!t back then. But they certainly didn't blame the previous generation for making them buy said stupid sh!t and putting themselves in the poor house.

But no, "F those boomers for making us buy $2000 smartphones and making us take $10K exotic vacays every six months!"
 

bigpoppa

Well-known member
Not saying old people didn't buy stupid sh!t back then. But they certainly didn't blame the previous generation for making them buy said stupid sh!t and putting themselves in the poor house.

But no, "F those boomers for making us buy $2000 smartphones and making us take $10K exotic vacays every six months!"

lol where is that direct quote from?

Also maybe your not familiar with pop culture, but people back then very much blamed the old folks...
what was the saying? Dont trust anyone over 30?

Previous generations ******* the next ones, is very much in line with historical trends. The only difference is boomers were the largest generation and therefore did the most amount of *******.
 

Lightcycle

Rounder of bolts, Dropper of tools
Site Supporter
lol where is that direct quote from?

Also maybe your not familiar with pop culture, but people back then very much blamed the old folks...
what was the saying? Dont trust anyone over 30?

Previous generations ******* the next ones, is very much in line with historical trends. The only difference is boomers were the largest generation and therefore did the most amount of *******.

The quote is a distillation of a double-standard that I see with a lot of young people complaining about the cost of living and blaming their circumstances on the generation before them, yet not taking responsibility for their own irresponsible spending habits. There is an excess of spending today by people of *all* ages that has been happening ever since WWII. Not just boomers. Not just Millennials. Everyone.

I'm not a Millennial, nor am I a Boomer. I think young people today do face uphill battles when it comes to housing costs. Just like prior generations faced recessions, depressions, inflation and high interest rates. I think older people are flippant when it comes to the solution. "Just work harder, like us!" is not a solution.

But as far as sloganeering goes, "Don't trust anyone over 30" is a rebel cry. It's absolutely not the same as a lot of the hate directed at Boomers for "creating this mess we're in". The boomers had, and still have, a reverence for the Greatest Generation before them. A generation that lived through The Great Depression and two World Wars. The last generation that seriously had to tighten their belts and weren't allowed the luxury of excess that has defined *every* generation after them.

"Don't trust anyone over 30" was an anti-establishment call. It wasn't a blame game. It was call to arms for broad-based change, and it transformed the world. It's too bad that a lot of the Summer-Of-Love mentality eventually warped into Reaganomics and the Me Generation.

"F the boomers" is not a call-to-arms. It's a Damn-You-For-Making-Our-Lives-Miserable. It's a Woe-Is-Me-I-Can't-Do-Anything-About-It-It's-All-Your-Fault.

"Don't trust anyone over 30" is a much more empowering and transformational slogan than "F the Boomers" or "OK Boomer".

So what? You had absolutely no hand in where you are right now? $10K trip to Santorini so you can pose for an Instagram selfie with your $2K iPhone?

Not being a Millennial or a Boomer, I think the generational definitions and stereotypes are bullsh!t. Our attitudes are shaped by global and cultural forces that go beyond the date ranges of when you were born. Millennials are not made of any more different stuff than Boomers are. They are genetically identical to people 30-40 years older than themselves.

Every person of every age and culture faces a different set of challenges. You can either call for broad-based change and empower yourself to do something about it. Rally the people in the same set of circumstances to apply political pressure on policy makers. Because as much as it seems like this housing crisis only affects people born after 1981, there are lots of older people that find themselves in the same situation.

Or you can make a vlog post on your TikTok account to moan about it and blame everyone but yourself.
 

bigpoppa

Well-known member
The quote is a distillation of a double-standard that I see with a lot of young people complaining about the cost of living and blaming their circumstances on the generation before them, yet not taking responsibility for their own irresponsible spending habits. There is an excess of spending today by people of *all* ages that has been happening ever since WWII. Not just boomers. Not just Millennials. Everyone.

I'm not a Millennial, nor am I a Boomer. I think young people today do face uphill battles when it comes to housing costs. Just like prior generations faced recessions, depressions, inflation and high interest rates. I think older people are flippant when it comes to the solution. "Just work harder, like us!" is not a solution.

But as far as sloganeering goes, "Don't trust anyone over 30" is a rebel cry. It's absolutely not the same as a lot of the hate directed at Boomers for "creating this mess we're in". The boomers had, and still have, a reverence for the Greatest Generation before them. A generation that lived through The Great Depression and two World Wars. The last generation that seriously had to tighten their belts and weren't allowed the luxury of excess that has defined *every* generation after them.

"Don't trust anyone over 30" was an anti-establishment call. It wasn't a blame game. It was call to arms for broad-based change, and it transformed the world. It's too bad that a lot of the Summer-Of-Love mentality eventually warped into Reaganomics and the Me Generation.

"F the boomers" is not a call-to-arms. It's a Damn-You-For-Making-Our-Lives-Miserable. It's a Woe-Is-Me-I-Can't-Do-Anything-About-It-It's-All-Your-Fault.

"Don't trust anyone over 30" is a much more empowering and transformational slogan than "F the Boomers" or "OK Boomer".

So what? You had absolutely no hand in where you are right now? $10K trip to Santorini so you can pose for an Instagram selfie with your $2K iPhone?

Not being a Millennial or a Boomer, I think the generational definitions and stereotypes are bullsh!t. Our attitudes are shaped by global and cultural forces that go beyond the date ranges of when you were born. Millennials are not made of any more different stuff than Boomers are. They are genetically identical to people 30-40 years older than themselves.

Every person of every age and culture faces a different set of challenges. You can either call for broad-based change and empower yourself to do something about it. Rally the people in the same set of circumstances to apply political pressure on policy makers. Because as much as it seems like this housing crisis only affects people born after 1981, there are lots of older people that find themselves in the same situation.

Or you can make a vlog post on your TikTok account to moan about it and blame everyone but yourself.
Bro no one is blaming the previous generations for everything, self determination is a thing and your choices matter, but you also cant turn a blind eye to the fact that a lot of fiscal policy or legislation coincidentally ends up benefiting certain people at the expense of others

Past affects the present, present affects the future. To pretend otherwise is delusional

No amount of saving on starbucks/avocado sandwiches or the 100$ you spend on your phone every month, can ever keep up with the cost of living skyrocketing, or the lack of a real wage growth, or the housing/rental market, or the ridiculous national debt(and the austerities that will follow as soon as that defaults), or the lack of a pension in 2050

The bar keeps rising every year, the required input keeps increasing, but the output is the same.

30 years ago a dude working in a grocery store could afford a home, in 2025 a medical doctor cant(unless his parents help out)
(not counting timmins, sorry madmike)

(Also boomer is not taken literally these days, its basically slang for old(er) people)
 

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