Ride Report: Yours to Discover to BC | Page 2 | GTAMotorcycle.com

Ride Report: Yours to Discover to BC

bigpoppa

Well-known member
Ya'll are making me feel really bad about my unhealthy eating habits
 

Iceman

Well-known member
Those food places look really good. I love sushi, but usually just get the normal veggie ones - those look great.

How is your bike for doing the super long days?
I recently did a 3000km run north around Wawa/Chapleau area. I found I need a seat and 1 inch bar risers. I'm waiting for Seat Concepts.
I already have a windscreen adjuster from T7 Rally.

Sent from my SM-A530W using Tapatalk
 

ScorpionT16

Well-known member
Those food places look really good. I love sushi, but usually just get the normal veggie ones - those look great.

How is your bike for doing the super long days?
If you pass by Calgary and have time, try them out, it's a small store, they also make traditional style matcha latte's and tea's, with the hand whisk and all. Deserts are also really great.

The bike itself is really fun, smooth, and the ergonomics are perfect for my 6ft self. I get no wind buffeting, just clean air, something the Honda CB500X just never achieved no matter what I tried, so in that regard long days are fairly easy. The seat however, is like any stock seat really, more comfortable than the Honda, however I do have to move around a lot and stand up here and there passed the 600km mark in a day. Like @Iceman I'm waiting on seat concepts to do something. I don't want to loose the narrow, long, dirtbike-ish design of the seat though. I did buy a sheep skin later on in the ride I'll mention in the report, maybe my behind was already too sore, I didn't find it helped in anyway.

Fuel economy is so so, I have to fuel up every 250-300km's when fully loaded depending on the roads/wind. So breaks get pretty frequent on long days just for gas stops, which help with comfort I guess
 

ScorpionT16

Well-known member
Day 4-7: Calgary Pitstop

During the 4 day break at my sisters place, I got some time to clean the bike and check it over. Before heading into the mountains I wanted some heated grips and gear, so made my way to Blackfoot Motorsports to see what they have, I had ordered a jacket of them and needed to exchange it. I was going to get a set of Oxford grips, however they had some OEM yamaha ones for the T7 with a built in controller, so I just got those. Install was fairly easy, though later in the report a mishap will come to light.


Part of the reason to get to Calgary was my sister had a baby boy, hence spending a few days there on the way to BC, on the way back I spent a few more days here. I've been to Calgary about 4 times now, in all seasons, through the report I'll include some bonus pictures from those trips as I had more time and photography gear, plus the mountains are very different in the winter. I've spent alot of time in Calgary, Banff, and Vancouver in general.


Some may like this, a sign in my sisters washroom.


As I worked on the bike, my sister's neighbour came by and we got talking, turns out he has a bike and just finished a west coast trip the day before I arrived. He works at a motorcycle shop and rebuilt this beautiful BMW, he gave me some tips, places to visit, and roads to ride which helped a lot along the way!


Day 8: Calgary to Kootney Park Lodge

I knew I was going to have a late start to the day due to some plans I had with my sister, so this was always going to be a short day. My sisters place is not far from Canmore, and I had just planned to get to Radium Hot springs by evening, however that got cut short for good reason. Also, I left behind all my camping gear at my sister's to travel a bit lighter.


I got to Canmore for lunch, and stopped by Communitea Cafe, always my go to place there, simple selection and nutrient dense menu. I got an Avocado Toast, and took a Wrap+Walnut Muffin to go for later.



As I reached Banff the weather changed fairly quickly, with the mountains it's hard to tell sometimes if it will clear quickly, start to snow in 5 mins, or just drizzle all day vs hail any minute. I threw on some rain gear, turned on the heated grips, and continued forward. I didn't know the continental divide is right here, there's a race called the Tour Divide I used to dream of cycling a few years ago. Then I got a motorcycle and touring on a bicycle went out the window 😅 - Having done long distance cycling, I still think of it time to time, esp when I see cyclists going across Canada.



On my way to Radium Hot Springs, I stopped by Kootney lodge to see if they have any souvenirs, I had no plans to stay here. On my way in the owner, Greg, was outside loading his car and we got talking. He mentioned if I would like to stay in a cabin for the night...


I looked at the views, started to think about it, then he threw in a great price, and I just took it.




I'm glad I did, it was a really great place and experience. "Originally constructed in 1923 by the Canadian Pacific Railway the main Lodge and surrounding cabins are a piece of true Canadian history, an unapologetically rustic mountain experience." Without a doubt, I'll be back here again someday.

As I was about to start having the wrap I got at Canmore, a couple in the next door cabin noticed the Ontario plate on my bike and we started chatting. You can see their red Jeep in one of the images below, turns out they were from Ontario as-well. The guy quit his job few months back, bought the Jeep to start overlanding and drive to South America, after Covid hit he decided to just tour Canada. His girfriend lives and works in Calgary atm, though he has been on the road solo for over 3 months wild camping, they both gave some good pointers.



I got a fire going in the cabin, had the wrap and muffin, and went to sleep. It did start to rain at night, and from the morning picture you can see everything was still wet.



Some bonus images of the area I took a while back in December. I'm not carrying any sturdy tripods or night photography equipment on this ride, so these can help fill in. I'll post more when I reach the Icefields parkway and Jasper part of the report.




That's a what a moonrise looks like at night in pitch darkness.
 

jdmsteR

Well-known member
Nice report man, respect for packing so lightly! Those photos are pro
This thread and @shanekingsley 's thread gives me motivation to do a cross country tour myself, hopefully next year! I will need to take notes of all the places you guys have lodged at and any other places of interest

Thanks for sharing, keep it coming!
 

ScorpionT16

Well-known member
Those are awesome pictures!

How much was it to stay in that cabin at Kootenay Park Lodge? Looks like a great place.
I think it's normally $200-300 for the night, ha gave it to me for $150 taxes in. Though it closes down on Friday for the season, my parents just spent the night there yesterday.

On that note, my parents stayed here in Nakusp 3 days ago and said it was amazing, I couldn't find a room in Nakusp at the time, so if your passing by, it's an option.


I ended up staying in Fauquier, at the Arrow Lake Motel, highly recommend it too, the owner was very polite, waited till 10.30pm for me, even gave microfiber cloths to clean the bike. I think it was $100-110 for the night

 

ScorpionT16

Well-known member
Day 8: Kootney Park Lodge to Fauquier
Today's plans were to go passed Radium Hot springs, have lunch in Kelowna, and stay in Nakusp, however I couldn't get a room/place in Nakusp so rode down to Fauquier, ready to catch the next day's ferry. Invermere to Cranbrook was very boring, in the future i'd do this part differently.
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The morning started off chilly and wet from the nights rain, with a bit of fog. I was very glad I got the heated grips and jacket at this point, they made the ride much more comfortable. I do carry layers in case, though got tired of dressing up and looking like the Michelin man.



Getting bored I started to try some side roads just outside Cranbrook, in the future I'd like to go back and take some FSRs upto Creston from here. I now have an idea of how long those take, and can plan the routes accordingly. Right after this picture, I ran into a problem. When i installed the heated grips in Calgary, I didn't have any grip glue, so just used some super glue... Well, that failed as the temperatures increased and I suddenly felt the throttle side comes loose, I could barely speed up or twist the wrist, let alone close the throttle properly. This got very sketchy as I had lots of cars infront and behind me on a twisty road, I was hoping for a gas station to pop up, and 2 mins later one did with a massive convenience store. I pulled in asap, walked in, and what are the odds, they had a whole section just for glue's, I picked up some bonding glue and more super glue, took the grips off, and re-did the job properly.


In Cranbrook, I stopped to grab a bite to eat at The Raw House, another great meal and place. I got the Veggie wraps to go for later at night, and had a smoothie (Best one I had on the trip, right after the place in Winnipeg). I knew I was going to have lunch in Kelowna so didn't over eat here.



This was the Glass House, located right before Boswell on the 3A. Neat little place, I talked with the owners for a while and his dad built the place slowly over 15-20 years and used to be an Architect.



Caught the first inland ferry of the trip, from Kootenay bay to Balfour, just made it on as the gates were closing. There were some other riders on board, including a WR250 rider who just came back from some ADV event in the rockies, he was wild camping along the way just doing FSRs.


The ride to Nakusp, on the 31A is gorgeous, nice quiet road with great views and stops. Lots of FSRs along the way I marked down for the future, great ride to do during sundown.




Nakusp is a great little town aswell, knowing I already had a Motel booked in Fauquier, I wasn't worried about riding for a bit in the dark. Riding alongside the moon, just seeing the silhouettes of the mountains alongside a blanket of stars has its own atmosphere.



I got to the Motel at around 10pm, the place was called the Arrow Lake Motel. I recommend the place, was a very quiet night in a clean room, the owner went out of her way to wait for me, give a great last minuet rate, and even provide microfibre cloths to clean the bike. In the morning, the ferry ride was right outside.

 

ScorpionT16

Well-known member
Day 9: Fauquier to Abbotsford


Hitting the early morning ferry from Fauquier, the plan was to keep riding, have lunch in Kelowna, then head south and into Abbotsford. This was one of my favourite days for riding, from start to end the whole route was all smiles.




The 6 all the way upto Lumby was amazing, some areas were pretty narrow so I didn't stop often to take images. I also made the mistake of not fuelling up at Nakusp the day before, right before Lumby I ended up using some of the spare fuel I carry just in case, I didn't want the bike to die on a narrow twisty road. Lots of Forestry roads here too, and nice to see the scale of such operations up-close.




I took the westside road to get to Kelowna, and wow! This was another amazing stretch of road, I could have done it 2-3x if I had time. Also lucky enough to come across some Mountain Goats, I love anything Goat related, being an Aries, and just as an animal, I love their nature, temperament, and off road ababilities. G.O.A.T, Go Over Any Terrain, hence the Aries/Goat symbol on the T7.





I didn't get a snapshot of lunch, some hottie in a swimsuit walked in and I completely lost all thought and went blank, just eat and ride out any hormones 😅 I had lunch at the NakedCafe, I've been here before, it's all plant based and a great meal as usual.

From Penticton, I took Green Mountain road... this was by a long-shot, the best road in southern BC I got a chance to try. The narrow twists, enclosed feeling, just everything, great recommendation on ADVrider.




The route comes out near a town called Keremeos, which then goes onto Hwy3.



I was getting sort of late at this point, so really regret not taking any pictures up to Abbotsford as hwy3 was amazing in itself. I did end up staying at the Best Western there, and recommend that place.
 

ScorpionT16

Well-known member
Day 10: Abbotsford to Kamloops

This wasn't a long day, however it was on of the best, Route 99 upto Lilloet is probably the best road I have ridden in Canada. Next time i'd love to bring camping gear along and explore this area more.


I've been to Vancouver about 4 times now, so didn't really take any picture's of the city or Sea to Sky hwy on this trip, however I do have a few images taken last December. These are from the Deeley Exhibition, may interest some moto enthusiasts here.












I reached Whistler fairly early, had some lunch there, then hit the road again.


Right after Whistler, the roads get nice and twisty, with lots of hills. At this point I stop, an old Dodge Ram pulling a very old RV pulled in for a break a few moments later as I was leaving, all I see is smoke coming out of the rear brakes, I point it out to the driver, and the dude runs back to the car to grab some water and put out the smoke. I thought he knew, hence stopping, turns out they were clueless. watch those brakes on these hills.



It was a Friday, so there wasn't alot of traffic around. There was a some sort of Porsche club around, cause I saw alot of these Beauty's going up and down the road in groups. Sadly this one in the image broke down and was about to get flat-bedded out.




At this turn off, I met 2 moto campers, one was on an Africa Twin and the other a GSA800, they were both 2-up riding from Victoria, so not hitting much gravel, good chat nonetheless.
 

ScorpionT16

Well-known member
The rest of the way up to the Lilloet was amazing. I fuelled up, and got ready to reach Kamloops.




On the way, I came across this fire that had just started a few minuets prior on someone's property, the cars on the property had all just blown up as a result, and there were no fire services nearby, so the locals safely directed traffic.





The ride to Kamloops wasn't anything spectacular, just the Trans Canada all the way there. If I had more time I would have gone through Tunkwa Provincial park.



I stayed at the Hampton Inn, great place with Motorcycle Parking.
 

MacDoc

Well-known member
Site Supporter
Impressed with the T7 ...maybe there finally IS a do all bike.
Enjoyed the pics too. Between you and Shane I'm thinking I need to get out there on the bike again. Wonder if Air Canada will cooperate. :unsure: 🏍
 

Roadghost

Well-known member
Not sure which roads they are, but there are sections of the old Trans Canada highway in Ontario you can explore. I believe they rebuilt the highway sometime in the 1960s and abandoned several old sections. I saw some of them and it's pretty scary what they called a road back in the 1950s. It would be fun to explore them.
 

ScorpionT16

Well-known member
Impressed with the T7 ...maybe there finally IS a do all bike.
Enjoyed the pics too. Between you and Shane I'm thinking I need to get out there on the bike again. Wonder if Air Canada will cooperate. :unsure: 🏍
In the right hands, the T7 will do it all. if Air Canada doesn't, you can approach a trucking/logistics company, that's what I looked into pre-covid and the rates weren't far off from Air Canada. west jet had a fly your bike program too. If I went out west again, I'd def look at the fly in, or truck the bike there option, prairies were misreable and just add extra wear to the bike, plus time.

maybe we can get a group of riders here, one of rents a u-haul one-way and just drops the bikes off out west, I'd do that.

Not sure which roads they are, but there are sections of the old Trans Canada highway in Ontario you can explore. I believe they rebuilt the highway sometime in the 1960s and abandoned several old sections. I saw some of them and it's pretty scary what they called a road back in the 1950s. It would be fun to explore them.
I will look more into that, I know there's the waterfront trail, not sure if that was part of the old hwy system
 

Roadghost

Well-known member
I will look more into that, I know there's the waterfront trail, not sure if that was part of the old hwy system
I'm referring to the road, 17 that runs over top of Superior. Parts of the old road it might be integrated into the Trans Canada Trail system. I don't believe it was actually called the Trans-Canada back then, it was just a road pretty much started by settlers and eventually paved.
 

ScorpionT16

Well-known member
Day 11: Kamloops to Valemont

This day was by far the most enjoyable one of the trip, filled with off-road views and routes, some that lead to dead ends, started of in a desert climate at 28c+ and ended the evening in snow capped moutains. Only thing i would have changed is getting up earlier to take some more FSRs.


From Kamloops, I headed straight toward the Lac Du Bois Road, I just saw random routes on Google maps the night before that looked twisty, gravely, and took a chance, only drawback was, I lost a lot of time on these paths and instead of making it to Jasper like I wanted to for the day, I only ended up in, well, we shall see...





I really loved this road, I didn't know if it would just lead to an overgrown dead end, a farm, a park, or a great vista. Traffic was sparse at best, and it had some great switchbacks alongside climbs.





Things were going great, till I hit a road that, well, once must have looked like a road. I took it repeating to myself if it got too bad, I could just turn around. It led into the trees, and eventually came out to another fork. These are areas I recommend a Garmin inReach, no cell signal and it could be a while before anyone shows up.




Things got more loose, from grass it turned to gravel once again and the T7 was smiling the whole time. She's been slabbing for a bit now, push a button to turn the ABS off and you see her smile saying her favourite 2 words "off road".




There are lots of these Texas Gates along the way, watch out for these, one missing or broken pole in the middle and you'll be doing an endo over the bars in no time


As the route was about to get back onto the main road...


I started to debate wether to do some more gravel for the day, or risk not making it to Jasper before dark, or get stuck without camping gear out here in the dark.


 
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ScorpionT16

Well-known member
I decided to take the gravel route up as far as it went, this was the Jamison Creek Main Haul Rd. There were some area's that ended in dead ends, though I'd go back and do this one with more time to explore. It was fairly good gravel all the way, close to the end, things almost ended in a wreck.

As i was taking these pictures, the Ford truck in the back of one of the images pulled over and told me of some falls up ahead, they were a small hike to get to and apparently worth it.



well, I got to the falls, parked, and after the small hike, I'd say they were just okay, nothing spectacular, though a nice few mins of the bike and a break.






The rest of the route was all smiles, a lot of cows to watch out for, they would just stand in the middle of the road and not bother moving, take the blind corners with caution and keep speed in check. The day was pretty dry, so I'd stop if any cars were ahead, the dust was just too much.




At this point It was getting late in the afternoon, and I still needed to make it close to Jasper, so I started looking for a way out and every road I would get to was a dead end. The only way out was to do the whole loop and pray it gets off on the Main road, and not another dead end. On one of the downhill curves, things got a bit steep, the gravel was very loose and soft in the corners as the trucks push it out. I went in hot, the front almost wiped out as I hit the rear brake to slide and not end up in the ditch up ahead, somehow, she stayed up and I pulled over to catch my breath.



The road did finally lead out, it ended at Ranier Farm, I stopped to add some air back into the tires. These 2 minions are at the entrance/exit.



I needed to make some serious time now, I know heading north and into the Rockies the temperatures would drop drastically and things get dark very quick, plus I didn't want to end up a moose shish-kabob. I stopped at Bear Creek for the usual on-route washroom break, and out pops a black bear, I didn't get a picture of him/her in time, we made eye contact, saw each other, and it slowly reversed back into the bushes. Guess it's called bear creek for a reason.



I was supposed to make it to Jasper, that would not happen, so i though of Clearwater at least, and then found a room at Valemount, a few hours west of Jasper. I booked it, put on the heated gear, and reached the town right as things got dark. The temps dropped to the single digits, I took a few last images of the snow capped mountains at dusk, then got dinner at a small cafe in town called The Gathering Tree.



I stayed at the Chalet Continental Motel, It was dark and around 10pm by now, so i didn't get any images, just a hot shower, tea, and then hit the sack. It was a great place, a bit dated, however clean and they let me park the bike at the main entrance lobby. Pictures are from the next morning.

 
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shanekingsley

Curry - so nice it burns you twice
Site Supporter
When I first saw this sign (not knowing anything about moose), I thought it was a joke sign about cows and moose interbreeding. But it's actually a serious thing to protect the moose population in BC and Alaska and maybe other places. Thanks for posting that up - learned something interesting today! Cow Moose Sign founder wants LEH for antlerless moose hunt in B.C. stopped - Coast Mountain News
and

How are you liking your soft luggage set up? I have a full soft luggage set up which I never use and am considering using it more often, since it's so light compared to hard cases.
 

ScorpionT16

Well-known member
I thought the sign was a joke too when I saw it, then I assumed a cow moose may just a be a female moose. Nice to see some awareness being raised on the issue.

I like the flexibility and simplicity of the soft luggage, it's also just clip on and off, so super easy to remove when needed. I've never had hard luggage or panniers, can't say what's better in that regard. The little 15L Nanuk case on the rear rack is very convenient for storing things that shouldn't be squished, like a sandwich, sunglasses, or camera. It's small, waterproof, and doesn't affect the bikes balance, so I find that, plus soft bags work well for such trips. I had my laptop in the soft luggage, and no issues with that.
 

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