Law Enforcement - The Good, The Bad, The Ugly..... | Page 244 | GTAMotorcycle.com

Law Enforcement - The Good, The Bad, The Ugly.....

Who was in the wrong?

  • Cop

    Votes: 23 21.9%
  • Dude who got shot

    Votes: 31 29.5%
  • I like turtles

    Votes: 51 48.6%

  • Total voters
    105

Baggsy

Well-known member
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That’s what ex-cop buddy told me also when I told him how annoying it is. Literally said the same words.

He’s right. But it’s pretty fishy when the lights go on JUST to get around traffic.
It must suck to drive a cop car in traffic.
There are lots of people who slam on the brakes when they see one, and almost everyone slows down way below the speed limit.
 

Rob MacLennan

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That’s what ex-cop buddy told me also when I told him how annoying it is. Literally said the same words.

He’s right. But it’s pretty fishy when the lights go on JUST to get around traffic.
As someone who has seen the lights go on, the cruiser pull through the intersection, the lights go off, and the cruiser immediately turn into a Tim Hortons on one occasion, I also tend to carry a fair bit of healthy skepticism.
 

GreyGhost

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As someone who has seen the lights go on, the cruiser pull through the intersection, the lights go off, and the cruiser immediately turn into a Tim Hortons on one occasion, I also tend to carry a fair bit of healthy skepticism.
I saw a cop go to tim hortons full lights and sirens, go in, pick up their order and leave again full lights and sirens.
 

FullMotoJacket

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Parked in cycling lane, wheel up on sidewalk, sub in hand.

AM-JKLXBYFQBfQ0NszfK4UWP2VbBmkcvSBNvNiJZU8m062hIM0pKIN59Y-UBbnjIbB7N0lCFK6_UQQm3v_fNNW5LHhq8zzKU_ktnOVzvELCzqtz08K2Q6FRGdZrevQ_DGM3CylS4ZWsoE-QvAbuHLct0_oyP=w340-h260-no
 

GreyGhost

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Damn. Son asked his dad (a toronto cop) to run a plate. Dad lied to a colleague to get the plate run and gave address to his son. Son shortly after murdered the guy at the address.

 

Maniac

Unknown member
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Damn. Son asked his dad (a toronto cop) to run a plate. Dad lied to a colleague to get the plate run and gave address to his son. Son shortly after murdered the guy at the address.

Page not found ¯\_(ツ)_/¯
 

GreyGhost

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Page not found ¯\_(ツ)_/¯
Interesting cp24 seems to have disappeared the story. CBC has it.

Copy and paste below in case it goes away too. Try to support media and read it on the original site.


A Toronto police officer allegedly gave confidential information to his son, who is accused of using it to help commit a murder and home invasion, according to records obtained by CBC News.

The allegations are found in Toronto Police Service disciplinary tribunal documents that outline charges against Det.-Const. Trevor Gregory under the Police Services Act.

Gregory was charged with breach of trust following the killing last year of Bill Horace, a former Liberian rebel leader and accused war criminal. Horace was shot during a home invasion in London, Ont., in June 2020.

Keiron Gregory, the officer's 23-year-old son, has since been charged with second-degree murder in connection with the shooting. His preliminary hearing is set to begin in March of next year, according to the province.

The tribunal records reveal new information about the events leading up to Horace's homicide.

According to tribunal records, Trevor Gregory was off duty early on June 20, 2020, when his son called him to say "that he had been defrauded out of a large sum of money." The officer's son shared the alleged fraudster's licence plate number in a message sent after the two spoke.

The officer then contacted police colleagues, asking if they could run the licence plate in police databases, falsely claiming there was a "strange car creeping through my 'hood," according to the documents.

That same day a colleague provided Gregory with the results of a database search, including the vehicle owner's home address, the documents allege.

The officer arranged a meeting with his son, and police later learned that the younger Gregory had photographed a piece of paper containing the suspected fraudster's information, the records say.

Horace was shot to death in London the next day.

Officer could face dismissal​

"Your disclosure of confidential information to your son contributed to the death of the victim B.H.," the documents allege.

The untested allegations in the police documents align with a 2020 story in the Globe and Mail, which reported that Horace's killing was linked to a scam involving money.

Trevor Gregory's defence lawyer, David Butt, said his client has pleaded not guilty to the breach of trust charge. He expects Gregory will stand trial next year. The Police Service Act charges are on hold while the criminal matter proceeds.

"People just naturally want to draw conclusions from partial information, and that's fundamentally unfair," Butt said.

A London Police Service investigator took a statement from Trevor Gregory on June 25, 2020, according to tribunal documents.

They allege Gregory told a "fabricated" story about a vehicle passing his home on June 20, but say he eventually admitted he received the licence plate number from his son.


Neighbours said Horace was found sprawled in front of this house when first responders arrived. (Colin Butler/CBC News)
Ian Johnstone, a lawyer who prosecutes police disciplinary cases, says any officer's history of checking licence plates is "easily tracked" by police services.

A database search would reveal private personal information to an officer, Johnstone told CBC News.

"They would absolutely get the [vehicle] owner and the address," he said.

Gregory could face penalties, including dismissal at the Toronto police tribunal, even if he is not convicted of a criminal offence.

"You could see anything from a termination of an officer to a demotion or a … loss of pay," Johnstone said.

Gregory is suspended with pay, according to a Toronto police spokesperson.

Alleged war criminal avoided prosecution​

Horace's killing prompted a new wave of questions about how the accused war criminal, alleged to have committed atrocities during Liberia's civil war, was able to live freely in Canada.

At the time of his death, Horace had managed to avoid prosecution, even though federal officials were well aware of his alleged crimes.

Horace was the subject of a 2010 Maclean's magazine exposé, which detailed his time as a general in the National Patriotic Front of Liberia. Sources told a magazine researcher that Horace's troops "beat, raped and murdered civilians."

Four neighbours identified this photograph as Bill Horace, 44, of Toronto. The photograph was published in Front Page Africa, a daily newspaper based in Monrovia, Liberia, linking Horace to war crimes in a bloody civil conflict that raged from 1989 to 1996. (Front Page Africa)
CBC News obtained emails from a federal initiative called the Crimes Against Humanity and War Crimes Program through an access to information request.

The program is intended to "deny safe haven" to suspected war criminals, and lists prosecutions among its "avenues to seek accountability."

The emails contain discussions among Department of Justice staffers after Horace's murder, and provide further confirmation Horace would never have faced prosecution in Canada.

"In the Horace situation, it was decided by the WC group to not pursue a criminal investigation," RCMP Supt. Mike MacLean wrote in a July 3, 2020, email. "As such it became a civil matter."

'Until my last day'​

Matt Eisenbrandt, the one-time legal director of the defunct Canadian Centre for International Justice, said he and others gathered information on Horace, and gave it to the federal government for use in a criminal prosecution.

Eisenbrandt told CBC News he refused to assist when the government instead asked for help in a deportation effort, which he thought would allow Horace to avoid criminal accountability.

A Department of Justice spokesperson said "the Crimes Against Humanity and War Crimes Program does not comment on files or confirm the existence of investigations until matters become public during legal proceedings."

Hassan Bility, executive director for the Global Justice and Research Project based in Liberia, who worked with Eisenbrandt, was disappointed the alleged war criminal avoided accountability.

"That surprise — that disappointment — I believe will stay with me until my last day," Bility said.
 

Mikedezo44

Well-known member
Hmm if license plate identification is so confidential then how did Mohawk College get my parents name and address when I parked in their parking lot, receiving a number of private property parking tickets...then they held my diploma hostage until extortion paid to them. (12 years ago) If you owe them enough money they must pay the MTO to search for them. Maybe the mafia or biker gangs should make friends with the head parking attendant there? May be less suspicious than police searching on their computers. Lol.
Though, I am not taking away from what this and many other officers do.
 
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GreyGhost

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Hmm if license plate identification is so confidential then how did Mohawk College get my parents name and address when I parked in their parking lot, receiving a number of private property parking tickets...then they held my diploma hostage until extortion paid to them. (12 years ago) If you owe them enough money they must pay the MTO to search for them.
Though, I am not taking away from what this and many other officers do.
That's private property. I suspect you agree to all that mess by entering. Probably a big sign covered with rules somewhere that is impossible to read expeditiously from your car.
 

GreyGhost

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Not police but a CBP system fail. A prick with no immigration status and an "immigration hold" gets a DUI then three weeks later crashes his bmw at high speed killing a few innocent people. Now the crown has asked for an investigative adjournment. Fack. Make him forfeit all assets they can find in Canada, kick him out and never let him over the border again. We don't give harsh enough penalties for driving convictions to bother with a trial imo.

 
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Rob MacLennan

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Not police but a CBP system fail. A prick with no immigration status and an "immigration hold" gets a DUI then three weeks later crashes his bmw at high speed killing a few innocent people. Now the crown has asked for an investigative adjournment. Fack. Make him forfeit all assets they can find in Canada, kick him out and never let him over the border again. We don't give harsh enough penalties for driving convictions to bother with a trial imo.

That sounds remarkably like a 14 year prison sentence (reduced to 10 for "good behaviour"), followed by deportation.
 

Freddy Fudpucker

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Guy was clearly out of control, figuratively, I dont mean his car was out of control. Probably on drugs too. Another case like Marco Rizzo or whatever the F his name was. Rear ending someone at a high rate of speed, high enough to kill those he hit. On a city street, no less. Shouldn't he be charged with vehicular manslaughter? Or did they do away with that charge? Seems "negligence causing death" is too soft and fluffy and is a charge that could be applied to someone responsible for, lets say, a freak accident that by a stroke of bad luck, kills someone. This was a case of someone being very irresponsible..
 

Rob MacLennan

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Guy was clearly out of control, figuratively, I dont mean his car was out of control. Probably on drugs too. Another case like Marco Rizzo or whatever the F his name was. Rear ending someone at a high rate of speed, high enough to kill those he hit. On a city street, no less. Shouldn't he be charged with vehicular manslaughter? Or did they do away with that charge? Seems "negligence causing death" is too soft and fluffy and is a charge that could be applied to someone responsible for, lets say, a freak accident that by a stroke of bad luck, kills someone. This was a case of someone being very irresponsible..
We don't have a "vehicular manslaughter" charge in Canada. What we do have, is "dangerous operation causing death" CC 320.13 (3). Maximum penalty is as I previously stated; 14 years. Aggravating factors to be considered include inebriation and existing suspension of license.
 

FullMotoJacket

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We don't have a "vehicular manslaughter" charge in Canada. What we do have, is "dangerous operation causing death" CC 320.13 (3). Maximum penalty is as I previously stated; 14 years. Aggravating factors to be considered include inebriation and existing suspension of license.

Having been charged with impaired 3 weeks previous he would have been under an automatic 30 day suspension at the time.
 

GreyGhost

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should have been brought into police custody at time of first one and on the first flight out of the country.
No conviction yet. Probably can't deport on the impaired charge. That's not to say that the dirtbag shouldn't have been deported for a variety of other reasons. My guess is politics is keeping him here (bleeping bleep bleep useless bleeding heart politicians).
 

Rob MacLennan

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Having been charged with impaired 3 weeks previous he would have been under an automatic 30 day suspension at the time.
Exactly why I mentioned both of those things, out of the half dozen or so considerations.
 

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