Anyone here a cyclist? | Page 30 | GTAMotorcycle.com

Anyone here a cyclist?

Joe Bass

*probably eating right now*
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A lady 5'2" hipster would be in her glory. The utility aspect is great for running errands, single speed but the gearing is very comfortable for casual cruising. Overall a very nice casual ride for a smaller rider.

It was done for a friend, she had the bike since new, hopefully it gets some new kms in the near future. It is also pretty enough to just hang on a wall.... For me it was just a bizzaro mechanical engineering challenge, so many things were "weird". Today the engineering of anything made in Japan is considered top notch, it was a good reminder that it was not always that way. It is a Miyata BTW... One nice surprise, the bb was square taper.
How small is the rear drum brake?
I can't make it out.
I don't think I've ever seen one on a bicycle

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backmarkerducati

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How small is the rear drum brake?
I can't make it out.
I don't think I've ever seen one on a bicycle

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It is "inside" the rear hub on the non-drive side, if you look at the nds picture in my other post you can see the reaction/torque arm under the nds chainstay (similar to a coaster brake) and where the brake cable attaches. This is a pic from above, the brake shoes ride inside the drum which is part of the hub just outside of the spokes. The black part telling us to keep our hands to ourselves... has the actuation mechanism. The entire thing is in grease including the drum and shoes... there is a hole on the side to pump in new grease.

Japanese Utility Bike 3.jpg

The modern descendants of this brake are used today in some of Shimano's internally geared modern hubs (Nexus I believe). It is stupidily complicated IMO, it does work well but I would not want to use it in the mountains without a fire extinguisher....
 
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FullMotoJacket

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That’s why the first officially timed downhill races at Mt. Tam were called the Repack, because you had to repack the grease in your coaster brake after every run. It all got burned off.
 

backmarkerducati

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New to me acquisition, we will see how this goes... I am hoping it provides a bit of a backyard workout for the cooler late fall as I am learning. Then some balance improvement etc. Track stands are getting too easy.
Unicycle (2).jpg
 

nakkers

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New to me acquisition, we will see how this goes... I am hoping it provides a bit of a backyard workout for the cooler late fall as I am learning. Then some balance improvement etc. Track stands are getting too easy.
View attachment 44972

Had a riot a LONG time ago with a couple of them. Had a 20” and a 24”. For the life of me, I couldn’t remain stationary as I had a difficult time with backward peddling. I could for a few but, would always end up moving forward. Got pretty good going up and down curbs and stuff. Getting on wasn’t too bad. At least as far as I can remember. I’d likely fall and crack my melon if I attempted it now.

Need pics of you on it vertical! Lol.


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Joe Bass

*probably eating right now*
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Had a riot a LONG time ago with a couple of them. Had a 20” and a 24”. For the life of me, I couldn’t remain stationary as I had a difficult time with backward peddling. I could for a few but, would always end up moving forward. Got pretty good going up and down curbs and stuff. Getting on wasn’t too bad. At least as far as I can remember. I’d likely fall and crack my melon if I attempted it now.

Need pics of you on it vertical! Lol.


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Video might be more entertaining.


No chance I'd ever try it

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backmarkerducati

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There are both 1" and 1 1/8" straight in both threaded and threadless for road, some more common than others. Not sure on the tapered for road. Others here may know.

What are you working on?
 
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daught

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I got the GF a jake the snake. I am a huge fan of jake the snake and kona in general. She's short so I been looking for over a year for a frame under 50cm. I scored her a 2010 47cm JTS. That's the last year with steel forks. In 2011 they went carbon fork and tapered steerer. Her bike is quite heavier than my 2012 62cm JTS. Her tires are the main culprit but I would like to get her a carbon fork. It won't be easy to find a 1-1/8 cantilever straight steerer carbon fork.
 

backmarkerducati

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You will have to dig around, specially to find something that is in stock these days, I know Ritchey has one, there are likely many others....


Depending on how she uses the bike and the tire size you can also go with a road fork and caliper brakes, same cable pull as cantilevers...

A quality carbon CX fork will likely drop a pound give or take from the bike.
 

backmarkerducati

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No. That’s why they make 2 road levers with different pull ratios.

My understanding and experience is that old style MTB cantis and older road calipers are pretty much the same pull ratio. MTB style V-Brakes are different and so are the newest Shimano road.

I believe a 2010 JTS has old style MTB cantilevers. If the are V-brakes it will be a different pull.
 

daught

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The cantis used on these bikes have short arms. They work with any modern lever. From the factory I have regular 105 with avid shorty cantis. There's also short (80-85mm) arm v-brakes made to replace these cantis. Tektro 926AL, TRP CX 8.4, box three. The pull matches road/canti pull.
 

FullMotoJacket

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Ask a Mechanic: Brake Lever and Caliper Cross Compatibility


Question: Can you do a video on tips for mixing and matching brake calipers and levers for road applications? For example, can I use Dura Ace 7800 STI levers with Dura Ace 9000 brake calipers? Can I use the reverse? From: Phillip

Answer: Until Shimano changed the design of their brake calipers and their brake levers’ cable pull ratio, every cable actuated road brake lever was compatible with every road brake caliper including cantilever brakes. Shimano made this change when they went to their SLR-EV brake architecture. Rather than list out what Shimano group generations are made for SLR-EV, and which ones are for the traditional brakes, there is a very easy way to understand which levers work with each type of brake. If the shift cables go under the handlebar tape, the lever is made to work with SLR-EV brakes. If the shift cable is exposed coming out of the shifter, this lever is made for traditional brakes.

The newer style shifters with the shifter cables run under the tape pull more brake cable per pull than the older levers. So, if you were to use a Dura Ace 9000 caliper with a Dura Ace 7800 lever, the lever feel would be too mushy. So mushy in fact that it’s dangerous. If you did the reverse, with a 9000 lever and a 7800 caliper, the lever feel is very firm and lacks power and modulation. It isn’t as dangerous as an old lever with a new brake, but is obviously less than ideal.

Because SRAM, Campy, and most aftermarket brakes, such as Ciamillo brakes for example, use the old traditional cable pull ratio, they are unsafe to run with the new style Shimano brake levers. However, they will all work just fine with the old style Shimano levers.

This also means that current Campy and SRAM brakes can be used interchangeably with levers from either company, but keep in mind that they are optimized for use with their own respective levers.


Cole's Notes: It might work. It might not. It probably won't be ideal.
 

daught

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The pull needed for cantis and v-brakes is directly proportional to the arm length. Somewhere between 80 to 120mm something will work. GFs Tiagra external cable has the same pull as my old 10spd 105 and my new 11spd 105. Claiming that external cable brakes are not compatible with under tape brakes is too broad. That rule likely only applies to dura-ace.
 

backmarkerducati

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Ask a Mechanic: Brake Lever and Caliper Cross Compatibility


Question: Can you do a video on tips for mixing and matching brake calipers and levers for road applications? For example, can I use Dura Ace 7800 STI levers with Dura Ace 9000 brake calipers? Can I use the reverse? From: Phillip

Answer: Until Shimano changed the design of their brake calipers and their brake levers’ cable pull ratio, every cable actuated road brake lever was compatible with every road brake caliper including cantilever brakes. Shimano made this change when they went to their SLR-EV brake architecture. Rather than list out what Shimano group generations are made for SLR-EV, and which ones are for the traditional brakes, there is a very easy way to understand which levers work with each type of brake. If the shift cables go under the handlebar tape, the lever is made to work with SLR-EV brakes. If the shift cable is exposed coming out of the shifter, this lever is made for traditional brakes.

The newer style shifters with the shifter cables run under the tape pull more brake cable per pull than the older levers. So, if you were to use a Dura Ace 9000 caliper with a Dura Ace 7800 lever, the lever feel would be too mushy. So mushy in fact that it’s dangerous. If you did the reverse, with a 9000 lever and a 7800 caliper, the lever feel is very firm and lacks power and modulation. It isn’t as dangerous as an old lever with a new brake, but is obviously less than ideal.

Because SRAM, Campy, and most aftermarket brakes, such as Ciamillo brakes for example, use the old traditional cable pull ratio, they are unsafe to run with the new style Shimano brake levers. However, they will all work just fine with the old style Shimano levers.

This also means that current Campy and SRAM brakes can be used interchangeably with levers from either company, but keep in mind that they are optimized for use with their own respective levers.


Cole's Notes: It might work. It might not. It probably won't be ideal.

He is talking about a 2010 Kona JTS with Cantilever brakes! 9 or 10 speed older 105 I believe....

They are the "same" pull (compatable or similar are better terms) and use the same levers as the older Shimano (et al) road calipers. No need to over think it and we are not talking about new stuff in this context.

@daught also pointed out that 80 mm mini v-brakes are also compatible with classic road pull (designed as such).

The real Coles Notes:
  • Most, but not all, classic road brakes (most mainstream brands), BMX and the old style cantilever MTB brakes have similar cable pull ratios. Add short arm v-brakes to this list. Mix and match.
  • Regular long arm MTB V-brakes require different cable pull and are not compatible with the above (caliper or lever).
  • New mid to high end Shimano road brakes have a different pull ratio yet and should not be intermixed.
  • Mechanical disk brakes depend on the intended application.
  • Match the caliper and the lever to have similar pull ratios.
 
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backmarkerducati

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Some fall riding inspiration.... did a 50km round-trip ride up the Humber trail to the Claireville dam on the fixie Monday night (this is a resto-mod build of mine including re-painting from a few years ago, posted here before). Also fooling around with some sun set shadows....

When I moved to Toronto about 20 or so years ago I saw this dam from the 427 and the trail and I wanted to ride there, never did. Forgot about it years ago, a buddy suggested a ride up the west leg of the Humber trail and boom what did I find at the end....

Claireville 2.jpg
 

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