2006 gsxr600 electrical problem!!! | Page 2 | GTAMotorcycle.com

2006 gsxr600 electrical problem!!!

Brian P

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No, you are all mixed up. I am going to try to idiot-proof this testing as much as possible.

Turn your multimeter to continuity-test (if it has that) or to the lowest "ohms" (resistance measurement) setting (they ALL have that). Place the multimeter cables in the correct plugs for making these measurements - some meters require the cables in different sockets depending on what you are measuring.

Turn the multimeter on without the two test leads touching each other. Note what the display says. Typically it will display something like "--" indicating that it is not getting any connection between the two test leads. That is what an "open circuit" with "infinite resistance" will show - a circuit with no electrical connection through it. Now, touch the test leads together. If your meter has a continuity-test function, it will typically beep indicating that there is continuity (electricity can pass through the circuit - which it should; you are shorting the test leads directly to each other). If your meter is only a resistance-test, it should display a small number at this point, possibly even zero (which is what you are doing - it is a direct short circuit because the leads are touching each other) but most meters cannot measure very small resistances accurately, so if you get a display like "0.6" indicating a resistance of (in my example case) 0.6 ohms, that is what your meter shows for a short-circuit (a circuit that conducts electricity with no resistance - because you are touching the test leads directly together).

If you are with me so far, you now see what your meter displays for an open circuit (no electrical connection) and a short circuit (complete electrical connection - "continuity").

Now ... You want to make sure that there is "continuity" between the voltage regulator and the battery on both the ground and positive sides of the circuit. Ground has to connect to ground, positive has to connect to positive.

Test #1. Unplug the regulator. Disconnect battery negative terminal. Identify which terminal in the regulator's plug leads to the red (positive) wire in the wiring harness coming out of that plug. Measure resistance / continuity between that positive terminal and battery positive (the one that is still connected to the battery - not the one you disconnected) Tell us what the outcome is for test #1/

Test #2. Unplug the regulator. Disconnet battery negative terminal. (So far, same as above.) Identify which terminal in the regulator's plug leads to ground. I don't know what Suzuki's colour codes are, but it will not be the positive (red) wire that you identified above, and it will not be any of the three identically-coloured (usually white or yellow) wires - usually there is only one left, that's the one. Measure resistance / continuity between that negative terminal and battery negative cable (the one that you have disconnected from the battery). If you cannot identify which wire is ground, hold the one test lead from the meter against the battery negative cable while probing each of the other terminals in the regulator's plug except the one that you know is positive from the above test. You should get no continuity (infinite resistance) at all terminals except the ground terminal, which should show continuity (near-zero resistance). Tell us what the outcome of this test is.

The wiring harness itself is not polarity sensitive. Electricity doesn't care which way it goes through a copper wire.
 
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GixxeR_IaN

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The problem is i have 2 red and 2 black wires that come off the r/r and i tryed a combination with the instructions you said and did not get anything
 

Brian P

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Every fuel-injected GSXR wiring diagram that I can find online indicates that you have 5 wires going into your regulator/rectifier:

Three yellow wires, which are the incoming 3-phase AC from the stator.
Red wire, which goes directly to that combination starter relay and main fuse module and then to battery positive.
Black wire with white stripe, which is ground and wired to battery negative.
 

GixxeR_IaN

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I tryed but i get lost when all wires come together, and i dont really want to cut and pull 1 by 1 unless its last resort. I appreciate all the help guys, ive been going at this for 13 straight hours...lol
 

GreyGhost

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Just so I'm clear

1) you have checked continuity between both black wires and the ground wire that attaches to the battery and found no continuity (-- or high number on ultimeter)
2) you have checked continuity between both red wires and the positive wire that attaches to the battery and found no continuity

Where do you live? A fresh set of eyes may be helpful here.
 

GixxeR_IaN

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Acton, 10 min north of milton on HWY 25. If you can come and fix it i have beer and money lol im that desperate, im pretty good with mechanics but electrical+me= Not exactly Albert Einstien lol
 

Brian P

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That connector does not look like a voltage-regulator connector, and it is not in a place on the bike where one would ordinarily expect a voltage-regulator to be installed.
 

GreyGhost

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That connector does not look like a voltage-regulator connector, and it is not in a place on the bike where one would ordinarily expect a voltage-regulator to be installed.
If you search for pics of 2006 gsxr 600 regulator rectifiers, the pictures show 7 wires (3 yellow, 2 red, 2 black). No idea why the wiring diagram is only showing 1 red/1 black.

Ian, post pics of r/r connectors.
 

Brian P

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Hah. On investigation, the regulator/rectifier is installed on a bracket just above the exhaust headers and behind the radiator. No wonder they overheat!

Treat the two red wires as if they were a single wire, and treat the two black-with-white-stripe wires as if they were a single wire, and do the tests as described above.

If there is no continuity between either red-wire terminal inside that connector and battery positive cable, or no continuity between either black-white-stripe terminal and battery negative cable, you have broken wire(s) in your wiring harness.
 

GixxeR_IaN

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Ugghhh. Thats wat i was afraid of lol. So do i pull entire harness out and strip it or is there an easier way with less chance of me butchering it
 

GreyGhost

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Personally I would run new wires alongside the existing harness (taped every 6" where possible). Opening up harness is more trouble than it's worth. Also, to test the fix, you could temporarily run the lines and clean everything up once you have confirmed the problem has gone.
 

GixxeR_IaN

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How to run new wires where do i have to attach em too lol i might end up making a bike bomb if i do this wrong lol
 

GixxeR_IaN

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Okay, so i tore apart wiring harness and didnt find a broken wire but thought might as well try this, i cut the red wire going to the r/r clip on the harness and cut the other end that goes to the starter relay and replaced it with a speaker wire i had laying around, i then check for continuity from positive in r/r clip to the starter relay positive and got a number, IMG_20140814_084418.jpg
Then i checked negative wire from r/r clip to negative on starter relay and negative wire that goes to the battery, so im thinking i might of accidently fixed it lol.

I have to plug everything back in and fire it up before i know. If this doesnt work i give up lol

Hah. On investigation, the regulator/rectifier is installed on a bracket just above the exhaust headers and behind the radiator. No wonder they overheat!

Treat the two red wires as if they were a single wire, and treat the two black-with-white-stripe wires as if they were a single wire, and do the tests as described above.

If there is no continuity between either red-wire terminal inside that connector and battery positive cable, or no continuity between either black-white-stripe terminal and battery negative cable, you have broken wire(s) in your wiring harness.
 

Brian P

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The speaker wire is all well and good as a troubleshooting test, but make sure your "proper" fix uses stranded copper wire of comparable thickness (of copper) as the original wire and make sure the connections are very secure (soldered - and you will need a strong soldering iron to get enough heat into that wire).
 

GixxeR_IaN

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Yes this is just a quick fix to see whats wrong, okay so i have everything conected and bike wants to fire up but wont, put it in dealer mode got code C23 (tip over sensor) i havent even touched that so now im really lost...
 

frekeyguy

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bike's electrical work is easy to sort out of it isn't butchered.
 
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GixxeR_IaN

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Okay! So now i have new ECM in New Wiring harness all attached and the thing purs like a kitten! One thing that is confusing me, so at idle is anywhere from 13.95vdc to 14.08vdc and when i rev up to 5000rpm it drops to 13.95vdc...

Shouldnt i be up at 14.5 - 15vdc?
 

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