Touring with leathers vs textiles | GTAMotorcycle.com

Touring with leathers vs textiles

brownelvis

Well-known member
I pretty much always ride with leathers head to toe but am reevaluating since putting on a rainsuit, over gloves and over boots is such a pain, and somehow I still manage to get wet.

What do people here tour with? And how do you deal with rain?

Is the waterproofed textile stuff actually completely waterproof?
 

homme de fer

Well-known member
I used to use leather but I sweat like a pig in it in the summer and don't have time to care for the finish. So, I switched to textile a few years ago (Rev'it! Sand Jacket and pants).

The inner liner was definitely water proof but I ran into another issue; the jacket and pants get water logged and weigh a ton after a good soaking then take forever to dry if you're camping. Solved the issue by just using an outer rain shell as needed.

Textile, for me, seems to fit better and feel better. I'm able to stay cooler with the vents open in the summer and, with the inserts, stay toasty warm when the weather turns.

It's a personal choice though, others will say you get more crash protection with leathers but that varies with manufacturers. I managed to ride away from a T-bone with a bear at 70-80km/h a few years ago without a scratch, just a broken wrist and some bruising.
 

Rotten_Ronnie

Well-known member
Site Supporter
I have an older textile teknic jacket that I favour as when leaving Onterrible I wear the full jacket, but once I hit the southern States, the outer waterproof shell comes off and I ride in the mesh jacket. It's bulks heavy, but does double duty.

I may have to get a Joe Rocket alter ego to replace it, but I find those inner rain liners laughable, riding around with 50 lbs of wet outer jacket.
 

daught

Well-known member
Is the waterproofed textile stuff actually completely waterproof?

Yes but it works both ways. You will feel clammy, even in goretex or more breathable fabrics. You might have gotten wet from your own perspiration. I just use a 2xl (I am a medium) waterproof breathable jacket on top of my mesh jacket and some ridiculously oversized pants from REI.

Getting a dedicated waterproof breathable jacket would only be good if you plan to use it on rainy days. If you plan to use it for multi days tours where it might rain or it might be warm, forget it.
 

MacDoc

Well-known member
Site Supporter
I wear textile with a liner under 10 degrees but I prefer mesh with layers underneath and on top.
I can ride from 8 or so to 33 or so ( and did last weekend ).
But then I've got lots of storage which a factor.

I gave up on "breathable" rain gear and just wear a fully waterproof iCon hiVis jacket over the mesh.

The internal liner is good for warmth ( as is the iCon ) but as far as waterproof - as mentioned 50 lb of soggy mesh is no fun.

Over size is good as you can get some circulation - with all the front protection on the Burgman it has to be coming down pretty hard to get the rain jacket out but then I will ride in heavy rain with the fully waterproof Icon as long as I get the neck done up properly.:rolleyes: Don't ask how I know that......

I like to ride in all weathers ( cept seriously nasty Tstorms ) and at night so being able to cope with a wide range of conditions is important.

I prefer armor on me than in the jacket or pants.

I gave up on dry hands - with heated grips - does not bother me.

Got some gortex hunting boots that are light and really are waterproof and easy to walk in.

A lot depends on the bike you ride and if you have storage. There was a swing of 25 degrees between here and Renovo last weekend. Hard to get something that works all the time without layering and that means storage.

Even some of the convertible jackets....you still need somewhere to put the panels. ( buddy had a jacket like that ).
 

brownelvis

Well-known member
I gave up on dry hands until I was aat the dollarama and found pairs of XL industrial rubber gloves for $2 - best overgloves I've ever used.

Sent from my SGH-I337M using Tapatalk
 

pnosko

Member
My full on approach to rain attire is to employ a 2 piece Tourmaster Rain Suit over top of whatever I was wearing prior to the rain. The rain suit packs down into a relatively small pouch and is always in one of my side cases regardless of where I am riding and the weather forecast.

I also employ the rubber glove from dollarama approach for keeping hands dry and avoiding a soaking for my dry weather riding gloves. The rubber gloves extend fairly far up the arm which allows them to tuck inside the cuff and arm of the rain jacket so rain doesn't flow into the glove.

If I know the rain is going to be heavy and last a while I also employ a pair of Tourmaster Rain Boot Covers. These covers slip over your riding boots and are open on the bottom so the tread of your boot still is effective.

All of that along with a full face helmet allows me to ride in heavy rain and be perfectly dry at the end of the day with no soggy boots, clothing or gloves.

One of the advantages of a dedicated rain jacket is that you can go with a high vis colour even if your normal riding jacket approach is a non high vis colour.
 

brownelvis

Well-known member
My full on approach to rain attire is to employ a 2 piece Tourmaster Rain Suit over top of whatever I was wearing prior to the rain. The rain suit packs down into a relatively small pouch and is always in one of my side cases regardless of where I am riding and the weather forecast.

I also employ the rubber glove from dollarama approach for keeping hands dry and avoiding a soaking for my dry weather riding gloves. The rubber gloves extend fairly far up the arm which allows them to tuck inside the cuff and arm of the rain jacket so rain doesn't flow into the glove.

If I know the rain is going to be heavy and last a while I also employ a pair of Tourmaster Rain Boot Covers. These covers slip over your riding boots and are open on the bottom so the tread of your boot still is effective.

All of that along with a full face helmet allows me to ride in heavy rain and be perfectly dry at the end of the day with no soggy boots, clothing or gloves.

One of the advantages of a dedicated rain jacket is that you can go with a high vis colour even if your normal riding jacket approach is a non high vis colour.


I have the tour master elite rain suit and the tour master boot covers, I'm still not a fan of the gettup. I think because the Super Ego jacket is already so cumbersome adding another layer on top just makes it worse. Maybe if I were to strip down to the mesh layer and put the rain suit on top it would be better.

I had the tour master boot covers too and was not a fan, I like Treds rubber overboots way better, watertight with a great seal on them, you forget you're even wearing them, but they are way more of a pain to get on
 

kiley

Well-known member
I don’t ride in the rain.
If it looks like its clear ahead then I’ll ride through it.
If I get soaked I don’t care cause I usually dry pretty quick afterwards.
If it’s not going to clear then I start looking for Motels with a bar across the street :)
I have a cheap set of Frog Toggs that have served well over the years.
To me….there just isn’t any fun in riding in the rain
 

Gary64

Well-known member
Site Supporter
I gave up on dry hands until I was aat the dollarama and found pairs of XL industrial rubber gloves for $2 - best overgloves I've ever used.

Sent from my SGH-I337M using Tapatalk

I recently bought these as overgloves.

http://www.canadiantire.ca/en/pdp/the-ultimate-glove-0422017p.html#.U3Nh7fldWoM

They come in SM-M and L-XL sizes. I wear a size large riding glove and the L-XL overgloves fit but they're so tight i cant wrap my hands around the grips. they are a pretty thick rubber so they will hold up well but don't have any flex in them. Do the Dollarama gloves fit well or protective riding gloves? I'm leaving for a 10 day Appalachian tour this Friday and the forecast for the first couple of days is wet.
 

brownelvis

Well-known member
I recently bought these as overgloves.

http://www.canadiantire.ca/en/pdp/the-ultimate-glove-0422017p.html#.U3Nh7fldWoM

They come in SM-M and L-XL sizes. I wear a size large riding glove and the L-XL overgloves fit but they're so tight i cant wrap my hands around the grips. they are a pretty thick rubber so they will hold up well but don't have any flex in them. Do the Dollarama gloves fit well or protective riding gloves? I'm leaving for a 10 day Appalachian tour this Friday and the forecast for the first couple of days is wet.

I got the size XL industrial rubber gloves from dollarama and they fit perfectly over my size L gloves. Any dish washing glove would work though. You could go and try them on or just buy a bunch and see what works since theyre so cheap.

Sent from my SGH-I337M using Tapatalk
 

Gary64

Well-known member
Site Supporter
I got the size XL industrial rubber gloves from dollarama and they fit perfectly over my size L gloves. Any dish washing glove would work though. You could go and try them on or just buy a bunch and see what works since theyre so cheap.

Sent from my SGH-I337M using Tapatalk

Thanks. I'll check out Dollarama today.
 

kiwi

Well-known member
I use an old pair of leather gloves for rain.
 

rafiki911

Well-known member
Site Supporter
These pants are water proof:

http://www.joerocket.com/catalog/index.cfm/237/130/Pants/Alter_Ego_Pant

That is it for all my waterproof gear.

When I first started riding I just used a rain suit that I wore over my regular gear. Annoying to carry it all the time, also annoying to get it over your gear with all the padding in our gear. So much more convinient having gear that can convert with the temperature and conditions.
 

MacDoc

Well-known member
Site Supporter


Above my payscale and can't image they don't get hot in summer.

These boots are waterproof too....

$89 on sale - superlight - comfortable to walk in - full Goretex
The hunting crowd got us all beat for choice and value and very cool even in tropical conditions.
They come nicely to my knee armor.
 
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