Stainless Steel Reusable Spin On Oil Filter | GTAMotorcycle.com

Stainless Steel Reusable Spin On Oil Filter

ungoloth

Well-known member
I just picked up a Stainless Steel Reusable Spin On Oil Filter. Has anyone used this product or one like it? It's supposed to catch 35 micron particles and provide 200 percent more filter area. Just wondering if I wasted $100+
 

Iceman

Well-known member
It's probably a great filter, if you're going to take the time to clean it thoroughly every oil change. Otherwise it'll work good for awhile. :D
 

Macs

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It's probably a great filter, if you're going to take the time to clean it thoroughly every oil change. Otherwise it'll work good for awhile. :D
Yeah, seems like any reusable filter whether it be oil or air is only as good as you're willing to maintain it every maintenance interval.
 

Scuba Steve

Well-known member
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A terrible idea there is no depth filtration to a stainless filter and 35 micron is the hole size so a particle 34x 34 x 200 micron can pass right through. Put it n the shelf and keep using a proper filter. This is decent explanation http://www.synlube.com/oilfilters.htm
 

dricked

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I wouldn't use it. I've been told by two different engine builders that they're junk. $100 buys you 8 oem filters which is 40,000km worth for a street bike. Return it and say it didn't fit or somthing to get your money back.
 

Concac

Well-known member
I wouldn't use it. I've been told by two different engine builders that they're junk. $100 buys you 8 oem filters which is 40,000km worth for a street bike. Return it and say it didn't fit or somthing to get your money back.
My BOSCH premium only cost $6 each. $100 would last me a life time of the bike.
 

Brian P

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35 microns is greater than the clearance between your crankshaft and its journals. That filter works like a sieve; it won't filter out anything smaller than its mesh size. Conventional filters will remove much smaller particles. I wouldn't use it.

"Will your engine blow up" - not necessarily; if the engine is in good condition then it won't be putting large particles in its oil and it will run for quite a while without any oil filtration. If you are only going to remove particles bigger than 35 microns, the filter might as well not be there.
 

johnscruiser

Well-known member
Site Supporter
I just picked up a Stainless Steel Reusable Spin On Oil Filter. Has anyone used this product or one like it? It's supposed to catch 35 micron particles and provide 200 percent more filter area. Just wondering if I wasted $100+
35 microns, yikes! The filter I use:

"AMSOIL Ea Oil Filters (EaO, Ea15K) have one of the best efficiency ratings in the automotive market providing a filtering efficiency of 98.7 percent at 20 microns."
 

ungoloth

Well-known member
I'm still trying to figure out if I should use it or not. It's on the self for now until I decide to install it or it becomes an expensive door stop. One thing is for sure, I'm really sick of folks posting **** they know nothing about (especially on other sites). I wish they would keep their 2 cents to themselves unless they have REAL experience or credible, verified data to share. Any &*$# head can google this and form an unfounded opinion. NONE of this helps decide whether or not to use it. I looked at a Yamaha ATV OEM reusable filter and compared it to the FLO. Yamaha filter had huge perforations in the screen compared to FLO. I have been researching this extensively (because forms are no help with the crap that's being posted) So far this is what it boils down to. Paper filters claiming 5 micron is a blatant lie. The oil filter industry is unregulated and they can tell any lie they like. Paper is inconsistent by nature and at best filters through it's weakest point. I will continue to research this but I'm beginning to suspect the best path forward is frequent oil changes. Opinions are like *****%&*'s everyone has one. I would love to post pictures of this oil filter (shockingly well made) but this is causing me grief. I can't seem to imbed the jpg for some reason.
 

inreb

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Brian posted in this thread what more do you want?
 

Wingboy

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Brian posted in this thread what more do you want?
As did Scuba Steve.An expert in this very field.You asked for advice,and got it.It's a doorstop.
 

RockerGuy

Banned
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I don't see the purpose of cleaning your filter after every oil change. For me to do this it would have to be remarkably cheaper. So much work for so little benefit. Paper is the way to go
 

Brian P

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Paper filters claiming 5 micron is a blatant lie. The oil filter industry is unregulated and they can tell any lie they like.
No ... There are SAE and ISO standards that pertain to oil filter test procedures. The current one is ISO 4548-12. http://www.iso.org/iso/iso_catalogue/catalogue_tc/catalogue_detail.htm?csnumber=10474 You may still find references to the prior standard, which was SAE J1858, although SAE opted to cancel their own standard a few years ago in favor of the international one.

The outcome of that test is a chart giving the percentage of filtration efficiency as a function of particle size. The ones that I can find online reach 90% single-pass efficiency in the 20-25 micron size range and are very close to 100% beyond 30 microns. Bear in mind that this is a single-pass efficiency. There is a 90% chance a 25 micron particle will be removed in one pass through the filter. There is a 10% chance it might get through once but a 90% chance it will be removed the second time. The amount of particles in that size range actually present in the oil quickly becomes vanishingly small.

Find out what the performance of that filter is according to ISO 4548-12 and compare that to standard oil filters if you want to make an educated decision on your own. If you can't find any data on how it performs according to ISO 4548-12, interpret the lack of data as you wish ...

Bear in mind that the original air-cooled VW Beetle only had a strainer to remove big chunks and didn't have an oil filter, neither does a cbr125, neither does your average lawn mower, and probably that ATV engine doesn't, either. The engine will survive without oil filtration at all ... for a while. The long term survival of those engines is contingent on you changing the oil frequently enough. No 16,000 km oil change intervals on any of those.
 

griff2

Banned
I'm still trying to figure out if I should use it or not.
It looks cool, so use it. Just epoxy a dummy oil filter nipple to the side of the motor. After the epoxy sets, just spin the FLO filter on on. That way you'll have both effective filtration and a cool looking stainless steel filter where everyone can see it.

Of course you'll need to get a replacement door stop after doing this.
 

Flywheel

Well-known member
As did Scuba Steve.An expert in this very field.You asked for advice,and got it.It's a doorstop.
We would need to pay them an honorarium, but I think an ASK Brian P, Johnny P, Reciprocity (and other wizards) section would be an great addition to the forum. Sure the threads would be like 2-5 posts long but they would be static-free. Then GTAM could collect the threads annually, publish them in book/magazine format and sell them to subscribers.
 

bitzz

Well-known member
35 microns is 0.00137"
Never seen a big end bearing gap that small.

I have one of these filters on a Norton racer... where the oil gets changed regularly, so dirty oil is not really the issue.
If we think we're having engine problems on the track, the pit crew (yeah right) can have the end of the filter off and hose the screen off with brake clean to check for metal in the filter before I have my helmet off.
We run one on the race car BEFORE the regular filter for the same reason.

I would NEVER entertain the idea of running one on a street motor.
I bet they would void the warranty on the bike and the oil in the bike.
If you use one, CHANGE THE OIL A LOT... like every hour or so.
 

Brian P

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Moderator
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Don't forget that when you subtract the journal diameter from the bearing ID, the actual oil clearance is ~half that because it's split between both sides.
 

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