Sportbikes are Not beginner Bikes | Page 14 | GTAMotorcycle.com

Sportbikes are Not beginner Bikes

sempre1

Well-known member
And that's one of the reasons why people get SS bikes. Although the Yamaha r3 and Fz07 are very good looking, and excellent starter bikes too.
I bought the r3 for fun and i truly love this bike to ride, makes me smile every time i go out...with me top speed was 191kph:D
 

inreb

Well-known member
Site Supporter
Everyone told me I would get sick of my 300 quick...almost ending 2nd season of riding and I am still in LOVE with it - start of this season I upgraded to full Hindle exhaust with power commander and Diablo Rosso II's - the bike is unreal! so fun - I don't feel like its bigger than me...though I don't do a lot of highway rides, mostly back roads (country), but i kick it at 150 (sometimes) just fine :) IT handles exactly the way I tell it to...and it is super fun! I could give 2 sh*ts about anyone who snubs any bike under an r or a 600...those are the ones who aren't in it for the riding, but the "status of riding"... for me Riding = ZEN....
Fun fact: in this hobby, passion, lifestyle and pride parade most riders think their choice is the best one. That's why they made that choice. The process of coming to that choice required a systematic elimination of other choices. If somebody doesn't gush, or worse, disses your ride they are revealing the remnants of that process. Others are just haters. We should lobby the .gov to legislate this type of hurt feeling out of existence. Why are you a 2 sh*ts denier?
 

Blackfin

Well-known member
Site Supporter
I thought countersteering was intuitive right from the start. I'm a new rider and it doesn't confuse me at all.
I still don't understand why MSCs (etc) put so much focus on "countersteering." It's basic physics and if you've ever ridden a push-bike (aka a "bicycle with pedals") at anything faster than a walking pace then you've already practiced countersteering even if you don't know what it's called. I think focusing on it, giving it a name and making this big deal out of it takes what comes naturally on two wheels and suddenly makes people think too much and worry about it which can lead to boo-boos...
 

Alderson

Well-known member
I agree with the counter steering thing. I didn't have a clue what it was, or that I was even doing it on my mountain bike until I watched motorcycle videos on it. I was completely confused and couldn't understand how pushing left/right makes it go in that direction, cause you're turning the wheel the opposite way.
But once you get on a bike, it just comes naturally and you don't even know that you're doing it.

They really emphasized it when I did my exit course, saying that you need to push on the handbar, which I kind of wanted to say...Ehh.. Not really push, just lean with the bike and your arm will naturally push the bar, instead of possibly confusing some new riders into them pushing way too much on the handbars.
 

slowbird

Well-known member
In regards to the Push steering/counter steering stuff....just watch Keith Codes: Twist of the wrist II

It clarifies it all
 

Mad Mike

Well-known member
I still don't understand why MSCs (etc) put so much focus on "countersteering." It's basic physics and if you've ever ridden a push-bike (aka a "bicycle with pedals") at anything faster than a walking pace then you've already practiced countersteering even if you don't know what it's called. I think focusing on it, giving it a name and making this big deal out of it takes what comes naturally on two wheels and suddenly makes people think too much and worry about it which can lead to boo-boos...
It is basic physics, but it's not intuitive and neads to be learned. Watch a new pedal biker try to turn -- it's choppy and awkward until the rider gets familiar, then it's burned into the riders brain. For pedal bikes the forces are quite small and you're never muscling against them.

Motorcycles -- not to simple and is counter intuitive as speed increases. Riders must learn how to push through forces that want to make the bike go straight, and those that want to stand the bike up. The push for low speeds around town are easy to learn and come quick. Handline a long sweeper or sharp switchback require practice and riders must be taught to push through because at speed this is not intuitive. Motorcyclists also have to deal with higher forces and lower reaction times - which also requires more learning. To get what I mean, watch a novice negotiate a long sweeper - you'll likely see some difficulty holding a line, you'l also see the bike stand up straight when they get spooked off the throttle - both happen because they don't yet understand how to properly counter steer.

With a few thousand KM of riding, counter steering does become intuitive for most riders - but not right out of the gate. Until then your brain does need to 'think' it's way through counter steering.
 

morkys

Active member
When I got my licence 10 years ago it was because I bought a 1984 Yamaha Virago 500 for cheap. I didn't like it very much and sold it soon after. I let my licence lapse and then a couple years ago my friend asked if I would be interested in getting my licence with him. We both bought Honda 500 cc twin cylinder motorcycles and both feel it was an excellent decision. I got a 2013 CB500F and my friend opted for a classic 1978 Honda CX500. Both bikes have plenty of power to provide some fun, but not so much to be difficult to control. I recently upgraded to a Yamaha FJ 09...an 850 triple, and after riding two seasons on the Honda 500, I think it was a good decision to ride a 500 twin for a couple seasons first. Sure, I could have been ok on this bike had I bought it first, but I feel better getting this bike now after having spent a couple years riding a lighter less powerful bike.
 
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