Sportbikes are Not beginner Bikes | Page 10 | GTAMotorcycle.com

Sportbikes are Not beginner Bikes

FriendlyFoe

Well-known member
And as someone once pointed out to me when I first started racing, provides us with a continual supply of cheap parts.
Wheres the like button....!!!
 

Militarii

Well-known member
started riding on a cbr 600rr..dont see any problem riding a sportbike as a beginner. Why do people keep saying they're faster...they`re only faster if YOU make it go faster..it`s like going into a car for the first time and slamming the gas to the bottom ...what do you think will happen..owe well...to each their own i suppose :)
 

Baggsy

Well-known member
Site Supporter
And as someone once pointed out to me when I first started racing, provides us with a continual supply of cheap parts.
I think some of the racers seem to encourage new riders to pick up supersports.
If it's to continue the supply, that would be sad.

started riding on a cbr 600rr..dont see any problem riding a sportbike as a beginner. Why do people keep saying they're faster...they`re only faster if YOU make it go faster..it`s like going into a car for the first time and slamming the gas to the bottom ...what do you think will happen..owe well...to each their own i suppose :)
You've never been on the gas too hard?

 
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tricky

Well-known member
Site Supporter
started riding on a cbr 600rr..dont see any problem riding a sportbike as a beginner. Why do people keep saying they're faster...they`re only faster if YOU make it go faster..it`s like going into a car for the first time and slamming the gas to the bottom ...what do you think will happen..owe well...to each their own i suppose :)
seems like you've had your bike for less than 20 days judging by your insurance thread, so I don't think you should be so confident quite yet

most people don't learn how to drive in a car that can do 0-100 km/h in 3 seconds, and it is markedly easier for a beginner to accidentally jam a bike throttle wide open then it is to put the pedal to the metal
 

Militarii

Well-known member
seems like you've had your bike for less than 20 days judging by your insurance thread, so I don't think you should be so confident quite yet

most people don't learn how to drive in a car that can do 0-100 km/h in 3 seconds, and it is markedly easier for a beginner to accidentally jam a bike throttle wide open then it is to put the pedal to the metal

You are correct. Don't get me wrong i`m not saying you should start on a sportsbike but also i don't think it`s a deathwish as many people say. That`s all i`m trying to say.
 
thank you soooo much for this post. not *** kissing, i just wanted to let you know that you changed my mind about which bike i'm going to start on. This post was really well thought out, and you may have just saved my life. Thank you once again!!!!!!
 

Decay

New member
I started on a 600, and there is absolutely no good reason to start on a 600. Its heavy and uncomfortable seating position makes it hard to maneuver and learn on. I've had a few close calls with the rear tire skidding when turning and stopping, and almost dropped the bike into a ditch when pulled over to stop. If I wasn't living in a small town I would probably have sold it. Learning to ride in Toronto with heavy traffic and aggressive drivers makes it a lot harder.
 

viper84737

Well-known member
This thread is basically summarized as follows:

"I can't handle something, so I don't recommend you do it, either"

Every other sailor would have recommended that Columbus not try to sail west to India. You know, it's too dangerous with all those sea monsters and you'll fall off the edge of the Earth and all. Better to just stay home where it's nice and safe and only sail about the Mediterranean only.
 

skapan

Well-known member
I've seen lots of new riders crash on scooters and small bikes, they didn't respect the machine like they should probably because they thought it was small and friendly. And I've seen my share of riders that start on a big bike (V Rod for example) and have no big problems. Scary moments for sure, but no get offs. Advice on a first bike? All I can offer is that you should choose something you like, that you think looks good, that makes you look good on it - and get out and ride. If you buy something you hate just because it was the "recommended" bike, then you won't ride as much. The only way to get the skills is to put in the time, and the more fun you have riding the more likely you are to ride more often. Just my opinion of course.
 

wearelopey

Well-known member
the saying "go with what you know" can be applied to this thread.

the idea behind this is that as motorcyclists we practise day in and day out in order to train our passive systems (systems that react without conscious thought; for example, breathing). we do this because if we get into a life or death situation where there is no time for conscious thought, we can rely on our passive system and "go with what we know". in other words the only way to be fully prepared for a split second reaction that will help you is to have ingrained that response through lots of practise; if you need to brake from 100km per hour out of nowhere you better have practised how to do it etc etc...

now applying the above to a beginner it can be suggested that they "dont know much of anything" and thus will freeze up etc when put in a life or death, or even an 'uncomfortable' situation(eg/ bike keeps stalling at a light, everyone is honking and yelling, so you rev up a lot and pop the clutch just to get the hell out of there etc). as a beginner we can assume that in a situation without conscious thought the beginner would rely on intuition (tense up, brace for crash, target fixate et al). motorcycles are thought of as counter-intuitive so it seems that their reaction would not be ideal, seeing as though intuition without motorcycle-specific training would not be productive in a lot of life or death situations on a bike.

knowing the above, i propose that having a smaller CC motorcycle for a beginner would be a mitigating factor. That is, that a smaller bike would react slower, and to a lesser degree than a bigger SS would (more 'friendly').

this is why beginners should at least attempt to start on a smaller bike; because when push comes to shove and you dont have time to think, would you rather be riding a bicycle or a rocket ship (extreme analogy but gets the point across)

my 2 cents

Sent from my GT-I9100M using Tapatalk 2
 
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Roomie

Banned
The biggest negative things I would say against noobs riding supersports is narrow field of vision and too much power. Both don't do anything to help anyone learn. While I agree anything only goes as fast as you make it, too many people get easily carried away if the power is already there. Learning on a more 'sport tour' style of bike lets one see things around them a lot easier. Also I couldn't imagine being 16-21 trying to insure a ss bike. Too much emphasis has been placed on looks from all the things I've read and heard in person. Who cares who thinks what about you ride, at least you're riding. I know many people with things like ninja 500's, katana's, older interceptors, vfr's etc. Most are between 28-40 years old and could care less that they're not on a ss bike. Some people need to let the image bit go and learn properly. I'm glad I did.
 

PLau

Well-known member
If you were to make a mistake and go down, smaller bikes are usually cheaper to fix anyways ;)

I think in end, age, maturity level, and experience on the road play a huge part in what is considered a beginner bike.

Just imagine a 16 year old on a 1000 cc sport bike... I think a 30 year old would have (presumably) more experience on the road and be able to make wiser decisions.
 
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Dougy

Well-known member
Site Supporter
macs-your such a wanker man but that almost made me piss myself...lol

jose-just go try out some different bikes ,you'd be surprised at how comfy some bikes can be while not looking that way at all.I'm 6'2' and around 220 lbs,I'll be riding an 09 zx6r this year,modified for comfort a little
 
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Macs

Well-known member
Site Supporter
I feel kinda bad, but he said it...lol. If he's got the core strength an SS would be fine. I know when I was a little out of shape riding a 636 for a day was a huge pain. I would be tempted to say cruiser or relaxed standard bike over anything with a forward lean though
 

Xuryfluous

Well-known member
Site Supporter
I started on a 600, and I was a larger guy (6'3/275 at my worst) Hit the elliptical and do sit-ups as they both work your core and build stamina. I've been doing that and low weight/high reps on the arms for toning; 100 sit-ups a day and 2 miles on the elliptical with a moderate diet I've dropped 30 pounds since January 15th. Think of it as the cheapest performance upgrade you can do to your bike go faster
 

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