Normal to be exhausted next day after long ride? | GTAMotorcycle.com

Normal to be exhausted next day after long ride?

aeon

Member
I have an r3, fairly new model. Tire pressure and everything seems to be in order.

I've just completed a round trip to Algonquin park and before another to Tobermory and surrounding area. Each roughly 800 - 900km spanning 12 hours with passenger, few breaks here and there for gas and walks.

The next day I'm completely exhausted. Its just baffling to me how sport bike riders can do 900 - 1200km multiple days for multi day trips.

Is there some sort of technique I'm unaware of?
 

busabim

Well-known member
Site Supporter
duh your bike is completely not suited for long distance....and with a passenger, lol
 

GreyGhost

Well-known member
Site Supporter
Throttle rocker makes a huge difference, vista cruise makes a huge difference, being able to move around to multiple seating positions while riding makes a huge difference. I'm impressed that you put that distance on an R3 with a passenger. As Busabim said, R3 would definitely not be my first choice for a 12 hour ride.
 

r3r3r3

Well-known member
R3 isn’t too bad of a road trip bike besides the lack of storage. Ergo’s aren’t too aggressive but it is still no Goldwing. Its more of a sport touring bike than a full on sport bike. I’ve done similar lengths on mine.

Ditch the passenger. I get tired after an hour or two taking someone around town on my r3. I can’t imagine doing 12 hours 2-up on this bike. If that’s not an option you may want to look into trading it in for something actually designed for two people. An extra 100-130lbs really puts a noticeable strain on the motor – I’d be concerned about longevity if you’re doing that many hours while approaching the load limit of the bike. I also find there is really only one way to sit while you have someone on the back and it pushes you right into the tank. Not a good setup for long trips. The real MVP is your passenger for doing the pretzel pose for that long.

Sensory “overload” can be a huge factor in your fatigue levels on long trips. Make sure you’re wearing earplugs to reduce wind noise and good polarized sunglasses to minimize glare/eye strain.

Luckily the fuel tank will force you off the bike every 1.5-2 hours so you can stretch and stop frequently. Make sure you’re eating and drinking plenty of water. If you’re bringing a bag strap it to the pillion seat instead of wearing it on your back. Make sure you aren’t doing a death grip on the bars the entire time. Basically just being loose and relaxed will save you a lot of energy.

If you’re a taller person the windscreen can be somewhat useless. You may want to look into a double bubble to help deflect some of the wind. I’m 6’3 and the stock screen just channels it all into my face/chest unless I tuck behind it.
 

Brian P

Well-known member
Moderator
Site Supporter
I've just completed a round trip to Algonquin park and before another to Tobermory and surrounding area. Each roughly 800 - 900km spanning 12 hours with passenger, few breaks here and there for gas and walks.

The next day I'm completely exhausted. Its just baffling to me how sport bike riders can do 900 - 1200km multiple days for multi day trips.
Very few riders actually do that. Your bike has the advantage of having a rational riding position and being relatively light and easy to maneuver, but carrying a passenger makes it more work and limits how you can ride.

Being young helps. I've done those long trips when I was younger, but I'm done with them. Now, the bike goes in the van until I get to the place where I actually want to ride, I ride *there*, and the bike goes back in the van for the trip home. Even within Ontario, this saves a couple hours of drudgery getting out of the Toronto area in the morning and the same on the way back.

In conditions where it's worth riding (curves, mountains, along rivers, etc) 250 - 300 km per day is enough for most people. I've done a couple of organised tours and they do about that.

The thing that gets me the most, is my right wrist. As long as I am moving around and working with throttle and brakes, it's fine. Sitting in one position while droning down a straight road ... kills it in half an hour. Some newer/fancier models have cruise control, which ought to help with that. I've never looked for that feature in a bike; if I'm riding in a circumstance that warrants it, the bike belongs in the van. The "throttle rocker" is a simple accessory that might help some.
 

aeon

Member
Throttle rocker makes a huge difference, vista cruise makes a huge difference, being able to move around to multiple seating positions while riding makes a huge difference. I'm impressed that you put that distance on an R3 with a passenger. As Busabim said, R3 would definitely not be my first choice for a 12 hour ride.
An r6 throttle tube really relieved most of the wrist pain from the factory default. Definitely will look into that throttle lock.


Heh it helps that its one of the first times on a bike for her.
 

Evoex

The God
Site Supporter
+1 on r6 throttle tube, best mod for that bike and it's $20.
 

LBV

Well-known member
Is it mental fatigue that translates to physical? I find just driving my car a couple of hours will zap me out. It's the mental alertness that takes it's toll - would be even worse on the bike but I haven't yet done a long jaunt of 2+ hours on the bike.
 

GreyGhost

Well-known member
Site Supporter
Is it mental fatigue that translates to physical? I find just driving my car a couple of hours will zap me out. It's the mental alertness that takes it's toll - would be even worse on the bike but I haven't yet done a long jaunt of 2+ hours on the bike.
It probably contributes, but I have found that the physical part is the majority. On a comfortable bike I have no problem touring with 15 hours a day on the bike. If the weather sucks and the bike is uncomfortable, I have been worn out in half that time.
 

Mad Mike

Well-known member
I have an r3, fairly new model. Tire pressure and everything seems to be in order.

I've just completed a round trip to Algonquin park and before another to Tobermory and surrounding area. Each roughly 800 - 900km spanning 12 hours with passenger, few breaks here and there for gas and walks.

The next day I'm completely exhausted. Its just baffling to me how sport bike riders can do 900 - 1200km multiple days for multi day trips.

Is there some sort of technique I'm unaware of?
Riding 800km is work, exhausting work. You're riding a small sport touring bike which has some pluses -- it's easy to handle, geometry is setup to make distance riding comfortable. Little bikes also have some minuses -- low mass and stiff suspension transferers a lot of the road jolt to the rider -- this takes a toll as your muscles work to keep you meat attached to you bones, you're taking a lot of wind in the chest and head and you may have an average speed that's lower than sport bikes and mid and heavy STs, and small bikes are a lot more work with a passenger.

Next, conditioning. Just like any physical endeavor, you need to condition yourself for long distance riding. With a little practice, 600km days should become easy. Once 600 becomes easy, try an 800KM day, you'll be tired, but not down for the next day.

Another thing, not many riders do 800-1200km days on a regular basis, I'd say the average 'day ride' is more like 300-400, with the odd 500-600km.
 

FLSTC

Well-known member
Wind exposure? I was never a fan of windshields until I got my current bike. I quickly got over the loss of being fully in the breeze and this turned into much greater enjoyment of the ride, having the screen take most of the constant wind pressure off.

There’s also a constant adrenaline response when riding. I suspect a lot of folks here are addicted to this. Possibly some adrenal fatigue? Maybe a B vitamin supplement will help.
 
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J_F

gringo diablo
Site Supporter
like a few mentioned, 12 hours and 800-900 kms on a bike is taxing
granted 2 up on an R3 is contributing to that

assuming you're a younger rider, I'm not
I can still do days like that
but second day starts with ibuprofen

noise fatigue is a real thing on a long day
ear plugs make a big difference
lots of breaks, lots water, lots of stretching also help

if you're able to re-position your butt on the saddle
maybe not easy to do riding 2 up
but that changes the ergos on everything:
wrists, elbows, hips, knees, ankles, back, etc....

getting locked into one position is a recipe for soreness
 

aeon

Member
Still young, about 6'2 and she's around 5'. Ditching her would probably mean a beating when I get back haha.

Wind buffeting is a great neck exercise

Definitely some great stuff I'll have to try next time
 

Mad Mike

Well-known member
Still young, about 6'2 and she's around 5'. Ditching her would probably mean a beating when I get back haha.

Wind buffeting is a great neck exercise

Definitely some great stuff I'll have to try next time
New info -- maybe a better idea.

1) Give her the R3 and some lessons.
2) Look for a bike that has better ergos for your size. At 6'2 you are probably squeezed onto a R3 -- I'm 5'9 and and R3 feels feels crampedfor me. To you it must feel riding a minibike.
 

Lakota

Well-known member
As mentioned before, earplugs, but also an airhawk seat cushion is what works for me. Did 4-950km days Banff to London last week. My bike has much the same seating position as your R3. Also, I only carry half a passenger weight wise with my camping gear. If my wife wanted to get on the back I would insist she get her own bike, I stopped carrying passengers some years ago. I agree, don't know how sport bike riders can handle those miles in a day, my wrists would be shot.
 

cknowles

Well-known member
Another thing to consider is the fit of your helmet?
My first helmet was far too loose (I thought it was tight) and at higher speeds the buffeting would make my vision go blurry.
When I bought my latest helmet (Bell Qualifier) I went one size smaller.
Because the fit is tighter it is less influenced by the wind, I find my rides are more relaxing.
 

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