New Riders...Start with a smaller bike! | GTAMotorcycle.com

New Riders...Start with a smaller bike!

arogal

Well-known member
I started riding in August 2016 and as much as I wanted a SS, I just couldn't justify why it would make sense (who needs that much power for a 1st bike). I took the safe route and purchased a used Yamaha R3. On the other hand, a friend of a friend who got his license roughly the same time as me purchased a 2006 GSXR 600 because he thought it was necessary to have the power as he'd get "bored" with a smaller bike. I have packed on about 7500kms and have learned SO much in the short amount of time I have been riding. As my skills have been progressing at a fast pace.....his not so much.
A friend of mine that has been riding for a long time, and as some people on the forum will say...It's more fun riding a smaller bike fast, than riding a fast bike slow. He has not been able to take nearly the full potential of his bike, therefore it has taken him much longer to build proper skill. To end my little rant, the individual that purchased the 600 got too comfortable and started to ride without using his head and was getting just a bit too cocky with the throttle. He took a corner way too fast up north, flew over a guard rail and wrote off his bike. Luckily he was not injured, but said he is "done riding for good".
Make the right choice, start on a small bike and learn how to ride the proper way.
 

Ashtonator

Well-known member
It varies person to person.
When i wanted to get started, some suggested to go with a 125/250 and some said 600 is fine.
I started on a 600 many years ago and learned everything on that bike including the most basics. And i mean the absolute most basics!
My friend who is a seasoned/technical rider taught me a lot. I listened and also controlled my impulses and took it easy the first few months until was comfortable with the power specially in turns.

You can definitely start on a 600 if you can keep yourself in check and not ride like a hooligan right away, trying to race everyone and prove something. And if you cant control yourself, then maybe don't buy a bike cause you can kill yourself on a 125.
 

MacDoc

Well-known member
Site Supporter
To end my little rant, the individual that purchased the 600 got too comfortable and started to ride without using his head and was getting just a bit too cocky with the throttle. He took a corner way too fast up north, flew over a guard rail and wrote off his bike. Luckily he was not injured, but said he is "done riding for good".
Make the right choice, start on a small bike and learn how to ride the proper way.
He's not the first here to move up too fast and end up dancing with a guard rail.... fortunately he's okay....too bad about giving up.

Really - if you are only riding locally the machine you have could be a long term ride for you.

In addition a new rider starting on a 600ss has more money than brains. Insurance is crushing.
650 KLR ...maybe is a learner bike .....there are a few others.....but not SS.
 

GreyGhost

Well-known member
Site Supporter
Again, it comes to self selection. Many people that are buying a bike to be cool and show off buy a fast bike and crash it. If you want to ride a bike, you have no problem starting on a smaller bike (and may even enjoy it as your insurance is hundreds of dollars cheaper a month). If you can honestly say that you would rather not ride than ride a slow bike at the beginning, you should probably get out while you are still alive. Of course people can and have started on fast bikes with no problems, it comes down to attitude (eg ashtonator who got a skilled friend to help them learn and took it easy at the beginning).

Arogals friend is a typical example of the type of rider that should never have started on an SS but would not consider something easier to learn with. They were destined to crash by their attitude.
 

bigpoppa

Well-known member
But but but OP, you can go down on any bike! (*cough 48conner*)

So its ok to start on cbr1000rr amiright? Since a ninja 300 and cbr1000rr both have 2 wheels! Both are equally as dangerous!
 

arogal

Well-known member
After posting this thread I knew I would get mixed responses as every forum has the "can I start on a SS bike". Is the R3 a fast bike? No, its not fast, but has plenty power for the street. It's fun, light, nimble, and you can blast open throttle without grabbing a square km attention somewhat within the speed limits :S
I just thought I'd post on what I've learned/seen happen in the last year on 2 wheels. I guess this should have been posted to the new riders section!! and not general.
 

kiwi

Well-known member
To end my little rant, the individual that purchased the 600 got too comfortable and started to ride without using his head and was getting just a bit too cocky with the throttle. He took a corner way too fast up north, flew over a guard rail and wrote off his bike. Luckily he was not injured, but said he is "done riding for good".
Make the right choice, start on a small bike and learn how to ride the proper way.
So, does your friend blame "the bike" or realized his skill was to blame for the accident?
 

defeater905

Well-known member
Everyone I know who started on a 600cc SS or 1000cc SS, are either not riding anymore or dead and their skill levels didn't improve as fast as their egos. So don't let anyone **** with your head because you're not on a SS.

I"m on my 3rd season on a 400cc supermoto. My insurance is dirt cheap, I drop it like once a year without caring, It's a blast in the corners and I'm alive. I don't have any desire for a SS now. I'd probably just get a faster supermoto or naked bike next.
 

mbroyda

Well-known member
you can take a corner too fast on a 125 and have the same result, as many here already said: starting out on a smaller bike IS a good idea but not a prerequisite to becoming a good rider.
When I started riding insurance for SS bikes was a lot cheaper, and lots of people (myself included) started on one and did just fine, I didnt have my first unscheduled dismount until 12 years later when I got on the track.
 

killvino

Well-known member
It has so much more to do with the individual than the bike.
Agreed. its not that the SS is harder to ride or the 300s easier to start. its more about the type of people that are starting on SS are usually ignoring sound advice & high insurance rates to look cooler. the same kind of people who arent in riding to hone their skills or for the fun.

i see the same things as defeater905, all the people i knew that started on SS either crashed their bikes, stopped riding or barely touch their bikes. they were in it for the cool-factor
 

Ashtonator

Well-known member
all the people i knew that started on SS either crashed their bikes, stopped riding or barely touch their bikes. they were in it for the cool-factor
and a few other similar comments.

These are very presumptive.

I know many people who started on 600s and not only they never crashed even once in many seasons but also continue to ride and all the time. This includes me. Im in my 8th season. Always owne 600s and up and i average 15k every single year which isnt crazy but its not bad either for an uncomfortable SS.

So while there is some truth is some of what people say here, it seems more bias/emotion driven than fact based comments.

As many said, it depends on an individual. So no, not everyone who starts on a 600 is dead or not riding. many are very much alive and enjoying their season right now :)
 

48Connor

Well-known member
But but but OP, you can go down on any bike! (*cough 48conner*)

So its ok to start on cbr1000rr amiright? Since a ninja 300 and cbr1000rr both have 2 wheels! Both are equally as dangerous!
48conner is my evil twin brother. He's a real dick.
 
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bigpoppa

Well-known member
Everyone I know who started on a 600cc SS or 1000cc SS, are either not riding anymore or dead and their skill levels didn't improve as fast as their egos. So don't let anyone **** with your head because you're not on a SS.

I"m on my 3rd season on a 400cc supermoto. My insurance is dirt cheap, I drop it like once a year without caring, It's a blast in the corners and I'm alive. I don't have any desire for a SS now. I'd probably just get a faster supermoto or naked bike next.
^x10

CAN I GET AN AMEN

and a few other similar comments.

These are very presumptive.

I know many people who started on 600s and not only they never crashed even once in many seasons but also continue to ride and all the time. This includes me. Im in my 8th season. Always owne 600s and up and i average 15k every single year which isnt crazy but its not bad either for an uncomfortable SS.

So while there is some truth is some of what people say here, it seems more bias/emotion driven than fact based comments.

As many said, it depends on an individual. So no, not everyone who starts on a 600 is dead or not riding. many are very much alive and enjoying their season right now :)
Dont intend to be mean, but

Im willing to bet the people that spend multiple years on smaller 'trainer' sport bikes(300cc ninjas 250s, etc) that learned to ride correctly, learned to push their limits, learned to push their bikes, learned the boundaries etc will outride you, every, single, time.

Its like lifting weights, if you try benching 600lbs when you've never lifted before, 1. you will either hurt yourself, 2. will kill yourself 3.you wont be able to lift correctly. 4. you will have bad form and probably wont be able to do the entire range of motion correctly

OR

you could start slow, work on the fundamentals and gradually build your way up

Can you lift that much in at once? sure you CAN do it...doesnt mean you should



#endrant
 

Ashtonator

Well-known member
^x10

CAN I GET AN AMEN

Dont intend to be mean, but

Im willing to bet the people that spend multiple years on smaller 'trainer' sport bikes(300cc ninjas 250s, etc) that learned to ride correctly, learned to push their limits, learned to push their bikes, learned the boundaries etc will outride you, every, single, time.

Its like lifting weights, if you try benching 600lbs when you've never lifted before, 1. you will either hurt yourself, 2. will kill yourself 3.you wont be able to lift correctly. 4. you will have bad form and probably wont be able to do the entire range of motion correctly

OR

you could start slow, work on the fundamentals and gradually build your way up

Can you lift that much in at once? sure you CAN do it...doesnt mean you should



#endrant
Again, another assumption. This assumes you know all the riders who started on 600s and all the riders who didn't, timed them all and are now making a call.

i can't make the call because i dont know every single rider in town or even most of them. What i know are many riders who started on 600s and are alive and riding every day and contrary to your assumption, are indeed fast.

What you're missing here with the weights analogy is that a 600 is not like a very heavy set of weights that you can't change. a 600 has all that extra power IF you choose to use it and WHEN youre ready for it. So its more like having a set of light to heavy weights which you can choose from depending on your level. Not everyone needs to buy a 250 to learn is my point. You can buy a 600 and just not push it to its limit while in the learning mode. In facet, I'd argue that learning on a 600 is harder and hence forces your boundaries more because it gives you less room for error.

My argument here is not that it's better or worse to start on a 600. Maybe for some it is indeed better to start smaller and move up. Specially those who cant limit themselves and need to be limited by force.

My argument here is against the presumption that anyone who starts on a 600 is either dead ot doesn't ride any more. It's just a generational which doe's have merit since im typing here right now so no we're not all dead or driving a minivan.

If you have control over your decisions and impulses, then start on a 600 and you'll be fine. If you are the kind of person who will push it as far as she goes, then i agree, start on something that wont let you go faster than your skill level.

600s are fast for beginners but not everyone who starts on them redlines on the first day.

That's all
 

bigpoppa

Well-known member
Nothing is carved in stone, there are odds, and people who beat them, but if i were to bet money, i know who i would bet on.
 

Ashtonator

Well-known member
Nothing is carved in stone, there are odds, and people who beat them, but if i were to bet money, i know who i would bet on.
Fair enough. and i hope my point is not coming across the wrong way. Im not saying starting on a 600 is better or worse. Im sure some who started on a 250 can beat the guys who started on a 600 or vice versa.

i think all of that depends on the individual.
 
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killvino

Well-known member
and a few other similar comments.

These are very presumptive.

I know many people who started on 600s and not only they never crashed even once in many seasons but also continue to ride and all the time. This includes me. Im in my 8th season. Always owne 600s and up and i average 15k every single year which isnt crazy but its not bad either for an uncomfortable SS.

So while there is some truth is some of what people say here, it seems more bias/emotion driven than fact based comments.

As many said, it depends on an individual. So no, not everyone who starts on a 600 is dead or not riding. many are very much alive and enjoying their season right now :)
im not saying it never happens. looking back, I could've started on an SS too. im just noticing the trend and correlation between the two. especially with current insurance rates

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GreyGhost

Well-known member
Site Supporter
Fair enough. and i hope my point is not coming across the wrong way. Im not saying starting on a 600 is better or worse. Im sure some who started on a 250 can beat the guys who started on a 600 or vice versa.

i think all of that depends on the individual.
The number of times that starting on an SS is better is vanishingly small. For most riders, starting on an SS is worse. Full stop. It's possible that for a small subset of people it isn't worse, but it is very rarely better. On most rides you can pick out people that followed this path by incredible speed in the straights and horrendous corner speed.

Small bikes teach people how to maintain momentum, you can get lazy with a quick bike and never learn that skill.
 

killvino

Well-known member
The number of times that starting on an SS is better is vanishingly small. For most riders, starting on an SS is worse. Full stop. It's possible that for a small subset of people it isn't worse, but it is very rarely better. On most rides you can pick out people that followed this path by incredible speed in the straights and horrendous corner speed.

Small bikes teach people how to maintain momentum, you can get lazy with a quick bike and never learn that skill.
don't forget duck walks

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