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Late to the game but here I am

MacDoc

Well-known member
Site Supporter
A ride somewhere nice might be good but might still be a bit early, so maybe in the spring. By the way, what are most people using for communications on those types of trips?
I'll bet you'll eat those words by early Oct. :D
You can ride to PA with me...I have new toy will need it's legs stretched.

SENA usually ...totally different experience with comms on....and safer.
 

Genesis

Well-known member
What you heard and how you chose to interpret it are two different things.
One day you will get blown away by how good some other guy can ride and it won't seem to matter what he's riding he will still blow you away. Riding motorcycles well, be that fast, over huge obstacles, doing aerobatics or whatever is as much rider ability as bike advantage. Learning your limits and the motorcycles limits are much easier on a bike that has limits the rider can reach. Learning on a limitless bike and never having experienced anything else will be a deficit. Starting on a big powerful bike serves only to extend your learning curve.
... don't expect you to agree with this right now but give it about 40 years and several crashes ;) you'll figure it out.

Stay safe, learn lots & have tons of fun rider.


edit oops, just noticed you're already 37 :| make that 20 years and several crashes.
I'm 37??

Sent from my SM-G955W using GTAMotorcycle.com mobile app
 

MacDoc

Well-known member
Site Supporter
What do you mean by safer?
Being able to talk between bikes is a whole other world. The reason I got mine in the first place....buddy accelerated on to a major highway with a long rope trailing, could not catch him or warn him till he laid off the throttle at 70+ merging into busy traffic.

Could have been bad news.

Got Scalas the next day.

When my son and I rode out west for 3 weeks we'd have the lead rider keeping an eye on road conditions while the trail rider navigated and relayed up coming turns etc.

So easy to discuss fuel stops, are you hungry ...what should we have for supper, how is your *** doing.

In his case since he's diabetic he needed to stop fairly often so easy to let me know why .....
In the twists we'd set up a distance so he could boogie ....see ya 10km ahead etc.

If I wanted to stop for a photo I could tell him so he knew it was not a bike issue ...he'd continue on and let me catch up.

In some cases it allowed us to pass safely on blind curves - he had far more power than my heavily loaded Vstrom so would get ahead and then let me know when the road was clear....I'm sure we gave a few drivers fits :D
 
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cainnar

Member
Being able to talk between bikes is a whole other world. The reason I got mine in the first place....buddy accelerated on to a major highway with a long rope trailing, could not catch him or warn him till he laid off the throttle at 70+ merging into busy traffic.

Could have been bad news.

Got Scalas the next day.

When my son and I rode out west for 3 weeks we'd have the lead rider keeping an eye on road conditions while the trail rider navigated and relayed up coming turns etc.

So easy to discuss fuel stops, are you hungry ...what should we have for supper, how is your *** doing.

In his case since he's diabetic he needed to stop fairly often so easy to let me know why .....
In the twists we'd set up a distance so he could boogie ....see ya 10km ahead etc.

If I wanted to stop for a photo I could tell him so he knew it was not a bike issue ...he'd continue on and let me catch up.

In some cases it allowed us to pass safely on blind curves - he had far more power than my heavily loaded Vstrom so would get ahead and then let me know when the road was clear....I'm sure we gave a few drivers fits :D
Ahh, I was thinking you meant Sena was safer than Cardo for their systems for some reason. Yeah for sure being able to communicate easily is safer.
 

Nevo

Well-known member
The R3 is an excellent choice. Its light-weight and easy to maneuver. The more you practice with each passing day, the easier it will be for you.

"Use it or loose it" really applies to riding a motorcycle. When I was starting out, I felt that if I wasn't riding each day, something was missing.

The more you ride, the more confident you will feel. Practicing push and pull will accelerate your muscle memory for when you really need it.

Go into an empty parking lot and practice your turning radius within the white lines, aim for a certain set and keep at it until you're able to smoothly go where you wanted.

The best thing about the R3 is you can push it to its limits and enjoy every second of it... but that will come much later. xD
 

MSFT

Well-known member
Welcome! I am a new member of the forum too! I was also late to the game.. 35..(divorced..ex didn't want me getting a bike)

My first bike was a CB450.. It was GREAT to learn on and practice with. For city riding it was perfect.. for highways not so much.
I am a daily commuter on my motorcycle.. so I used it everyday I could. I will admit I had desires to buy a stronger bike next season.. which just so happened to be accelerated when I was hit from behind by a mac truck.

Needless to say I love my new CBR600 but I feel as tho if the 600 was the first bike I bought.. it would have been too much and would have just steepened my learning curve.

R3 is a good choice. Enjoy that for the rest of this season and all of next then get yourself something more powerful!
 

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