Is it necessary to get a 400cc motorcycle with abs? | Page 2 | GTAMotorcycle.com

Is it necessary to get a 400cc motorcycle with abs?

Evoex

The God
Site Supporter
Never had ABS on my first few bikes. But I decided that on my next ..current bike that I wanted ABS. Why not not take advantage of new technology that helps you when needed. I have only noticed the ABS kick in once when I came to hard stop on a rural road that had gravel. I wasn't prepared for it. It may have saved me from a potential drop. Another situation where it may have good use is for when you are comming to a stop at an intersection where there may be oil on the ground that you are not expecting. I realize that alot of these scenarios can be managed by riding better and being prepared for the worst. But I'm sure that even some of the experienced riders here have had moments where they may not have been paying attention or considering all possible hazards. To me having ABS is no different than wearing the latest safety gear e.g. jackets, pants etc. I'm sure 50 years ago people rode without any safety gear and most people may have been fine. But if the option to use something is there that is affordable and provides you with more safety . Then why not take advantage of it.
Because stoppies yo!
 

Slick_Steveo

Well-known member
Site Supporter
Never had abs on any of my bikes either.

Interestingly, when we were looking for a new Ninja 400 last winter to turn into a racebike, the non-abs model was a rare find.
 

Baggsy

Well-known member
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r3r3r3

Well-known member
Only reason I see to get a non-ABS version at this point is the price. If you can still find a smaller displacement / beginner bike without ABS they have usually been sitting in the showroom for a while. I bought a 2017 R3 in 2018 and they had a pile of the non-ABS versions marked down heavily. I ended up getting nearly $1k off just because it was a non-ABS. If you are paying sticker price ABS is usually +$300 on these bikes. Probably will pay for itself when you are looking to sell it down the road.

My only issue is the inability to toggle the ABS on/off easily. KTM seems to be the only manufacturer that offers this via the dash. Shouldn’t need to screw around with fuses if you want to turn it off.
 

Evoex

The God
Site Supporter
My only issue is the inability to toggle the ABS on/off easily. KTM seems to be the only manufacturer that offers this via the dash. Shouldn’t need to screw around with fuses if you want to turn it off.
it's only the rear iirc.
 

Trials

Well-known member
Maybe it is just that I keep my motorcycles forever but imho
All ABS systems are going to throw a fault eventually, otherwise you must be totally awesome at preventative maintenance.


Who figures that pumping your brakes on and off gives you better control on a gravel road? <- good luck with that!
You want some safety on a gravel road, switch to radials.
 

MacDoc

Well-known member
Site Supporter
100 KMH is the same on any bike, regardless of the displacement
nope ....mass and tires have a huge play in stopping distance as does the quality of the braking system regardless ABS or not.
 

blackcamaro

Well-known member
I’d buy the ABS bike even though I don’t care much either way if a bike has it or not. Resale makes it worth it and if it saves you one time from hitting the deck then it’s been more then worth it.

Personally I wish all bikes you could turn the rear off.
 

Mad Mike

Well-known member
It's a bit of a double edged sword, on the sharp side the added safety is priceless should you ever need it. On the dullside, I've met several riders who have never learned to use dual brake systems -- god help them if they ever mount a non-ABS bike.

I have both ABS and Non Abs bikes, I can't recall the ABS ever kicking in, I can recall locking up my non-ABS bikes and doing the occasional unplanned stoppie in a couple of terrifying times.

If I was a learner I'd probably start in a =<300cc bike and forgo the ABS. Get 10,000km of learner experience using conventional controls, then If I decided I needed a bigger bike I'd get ABS for the peace of mind.
 

250R-ICE

Well-known member
Site Supporter
Trials,
I'm not clear on your point with regards to all ABS systems will ultimately have a fault code eventually. If your point is that the more complex a bike is , then there is a greater possibility of a technical malfunction over a similar bike without the tech. I do agree that if and when something needs repair, the costs will be more expensive. But saying all systems with ABS will produce a fault code doesn't make sense. It's like saying all bikes with fuel injection will eventually have injector fault codes. Hence why we should all go back to old tech and ride carbed bikes?

With regards to your point with using ABS on a gravel road. I don't have enough experience in these situations to know whether ABS is a benefit or not. I do know that in my example on a paved road with gravel on it. My ABS and traction control kicked in and most likely saved me from a potential drop.
 

Wingboy

Well-known member
Moderator
Site Supporter
nope ....mass and tires have a huge play in stopping distance as does the quality of the braking system regardless ABS or not.
Not sure who you are quoting, or if it is being taken out of context, because you refuse to quote properly. (Is there a reason why... dilligaff), but the biggest factor in motorcycle control is operator skill level. If the rider lacks skill, then any and all assistance is a good thing. Just sayin.
 

Hardwrkr13

Well-known member
Site Supporter
That's why we have mechanics and why they in turn make a healthy living.

Can't say i've ever met a rider who had an ABS system 'fault'. I'm sure it exists but i'll bet dollars to doughnuts the % is barely worth reporting.
I've had approx 14 street bikes with my last one being the first with ABS. At approx 30k it threw a abs code and dealer couldn't locate the issue so they ended up replacing the entire abs system (sensors/rings/module) on warranty ($3400 worth btw). It took 2 dealer visits and a lot of dealer asking head office what to do.
ABS on it also kicked in far too early before lockup so at the time of the code issue I asked if they could simply turn the system off and not have a code displayed but they couldn't stop the code.
 

Wingboy

Well-known member
Moderator
Site Supporter
My 1976 Yamaha has a very good antilock system. As a matter of fact the drum brakes it has, are also anti stop. :p
 

bakaboy

Old, Slow and Grumpy
Site Supporter
Nice to have option on a street bike for a new rider.

New technology? Shoot my 15 year old bike has ABS

However.....everyone seems to think that ABS means a good ABS system. This assumption is not necessarily true.

As a new rider you should be buying a used bike and not a new bike. This should be the base decision for you.

After this the benefit of having an ABS or not is an ancillary decision criteria for the used bike and its asking price.
 

Evoex

The God
Site Supporter
I've had approx 14 street bikes with my last one being the first with ABS. At approx 30k it threw a abs code and dealer couldn't locate the issue so they ended up replacing the entire abs system (sensors/rings/module) on warranty ($3400 worth btw). It took 2 dealer visits and a lot of dealer asking head office what to do.
ABS on it also kicked in far too early before lockup so at the time of the code issue I asked if they could simply turn the system off and not have a code displayed but they couldn't stop the code.
pray tell, which brand was it?
 

Trials

Well-known member
Trials,
I'm not clear on your point with regards to all ABS systems will ultimately have a fault code eventually....

With regards to your point with using ABS on a gravel road. I don't have enough experience in these situations to know whether ABS is a benefit or not. I do know that in my example on a paved road with gravel on it. My ABS and traction control kicked in and most likely saved me from a potential drop.
Modern ABS has like 86 error codes!
everything from low tire pressure to popping a prolonged wheelie has a code it throws out.
Best news is unless it is a sensor fault they reset on there own once the problem goes away, until then it shuts down and becomes just a bunch of extra plumbing.

re: "My ABS and traction control kicked in and most likely saved me from a potential drop." <- Hold on here, ABS is brakes and traction control shuts down your throttle :|
I seriously doubt the ABS saved you from a crash unless you would have otherwise cranked the bars sideways and thrown it into a skid like the videos do. You stayed upright on a poor traction surface because you maintained balance
and you apparently didn't hit whatever it was you were braking for (y)

Motorcycles slide real good! If you have good balance, throttle, clutch, brake & steering control.
and you can crash real easy without ever touching the brakes so at best the ABS will prevent you from ham fisting the front brake lever.

... nice board tracker (y)
 

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