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Heater -- Working on bike over the winter

GreyGhost

Well-known member
Site Supporter
Most people don't heat the garage unless they are working inside it. That means you want a heater that can raise the temperature quickly, radiator's don't work like that.

If you turned the heater off altogether I'll bet your garage would stay above zero this time of year. In January when the ground under and around your garage has lost it's summer heat, a 1500watt rad won't raise the temp more than a few degrees.

Electric construction heaters can deliver up to 4x the heat when called upon, this not only raises the room temperature faster, it will raise it higher, circulate it better, and hold it steadier when doors are opened and closed.

A well insulated 20x20x8 garage need about 4KW of heating available. If you want to properly size you heater, try this link. Use the sq' of your garage door, and slab on grade. Heat Loss Calculator
Damn. Not unexpected but heat loss on my garage is close to 6kW for a 72 degree F differential. That is just to maintain, more heat would be needed to increase temperature. With a 40 F differential, 3.2 kW is required to maintain. Oh well, I'm happy just heating while I am out there. Most of the time, the warmish breeze from the heater will be enough to make it bearable.
 

Mad Mike

Well-known member
... then eventually you will wear all that stuff out,
get fed up with all the condensation you are creating every time you let it get cold again,
and then you will pour that heated garage floor and say omg :/ why didn't I do this years ago.
I debated a heated slab when I built my garage, didn't do it because of cost.

A 6KW forced air heater cost $200 + another $100 in electrical. Total cost $300.

A simple PEX glycol install increased cost about $7K. Here's what goes into a 30x30 slab:

$900 for 2" under slab insulation
$1500 upcharge for fiberglass reinforcing fibers and extra 6 yds of concrete
$1000 for mesh and rebar
$1500 for PEX and fittings
$1000 extra for concrete placement
$1100 for a basic electric hydronic system -- boiler ($500), pump ($250), controls and plumbing parts & glycol ($250) and $100 electrical.

That was me doing all the labour except placing and finishing the slab - I don't think you could shave costs any more than I did -- I really wanted the comfort!
 

GreyGhost

Well-known member
Site Supporter
I debated a heated slab when I built my garage, didn't do it because of cost.

A 6KW forced air heater cost $200 + another $100 in electrical. Total cost $300.

A simple PEX glycol install increased cost about $7K. Here's what goes into a 30x30 slab:

$900 for 2" under slab insulation
$1500 upcharge for fiberglass reinforcing fibers and extra 6 yds of concrete
$1000 for mesh and rebar
$1500 for PEX and fittings
$1000 extra for concrete placement
$1100 for a basic electric hydronic system -- boiler ($500), pump ($250), controls and plumbing parts & glycol ($250) and $100 electrical.

That was me doing all the labour except placing and finishing the slab - I don't think you could shave costs any more than I did -- I really wanted the comfort!
If you just wanted underslab insulation, do any of the other costs have to be part of the project too (eg. do you need to add more mesh/rebar/fibreglass/slab thickness once on foam)?
 

Mad Mike

Well-known member
If you just wanted underslab insulation, do any of the other costs have to be part of the project too (eg. do you need to add more mesh/rebar/fibreglass/slab thickness once on foam)?
Under slab insulation requires no changes to the concrete, placing or finishing - the only incremental cost is the insulation.

When you install PEX, your slab goes from 4" to 6", plus you need fiber re-reinforced concrete, mesh or rebar. Concrete placement is also more difficult because it's placed with 5 gallon buckets instead of wheelbarrows.
 

Trials

Well-known member
We used a pump.
Foam is under everything, all kinds of rebar, my wife did most of the rebar.
 

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