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Clutch Adjustment

Baggsy

Well-known member
Site Supporter
On the WeeStrom, I've found that I need to pull the front sprocket cover and adjust the release rod every year or so, or the clutch starts to slip.

Is this common?
 

TwistedKestrel

King of GTAM
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Adjust how?
 

Trials

Well-known member
If it's anything like the old Suzuki's there is a multi-start fast thread made of nylon in there, take that out, clean it all up and stuff it full of silglide when you put it back together :/ or if it's really bad replace the nylon part.


... it was beautiful riding today :D
 
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shanekingsley

Well-known member
Site Supporter
This used to be done about every 50k on my bike, but lately I adjust mine about every other oil change. It's takes so little time to do.
Make sure you put a dab of grease on that rod. Also, if you decide to clean out the actuator, do so in a small tupperware container otherwise the ball bearings may fall out.

I like this thread as a reference point for the clutch adjustment on 1st gen DL650's.
https://www.stromtrooper.com/v-strom-service-maintenance-questions-discussions/63042-clutch-adjustment-help.html

I find it keeps the chatter down and the bike rides very smooth.
 

Baggsy

Well-known member
Site Supporter
with this thing?
once a year sounds abnormal

http://
Yes that's the thing. I had to replace the clutch in 2011. When it was opened one of the two adjustment nuts in the red circle was extremely loose.



I think that adjustment is not for clutch freeplay,but for adjusting the friction point.Could be wrong tho.
Yes, you're right. Once you set the release rod, you have to go back and adjust the freeplay.


If it's anything like the old Suzuki's there is a multi-start fast thread made of nylon in there, take that out, clean it all up and stuff it full of silglide when you put it back together :/ or if it's really bad replace the nylon part.


... it was beautiful riding today :D
I didn't see anything like that, I'll have another look next time.

It was cold for riding today. I went for a walk and saw some weird bird in the pond.

 

Trials

Well-known member
here's the part I was thinking, or something very similar,
that ball bearing between the 2 shafts is the part that is suppose to spin btw:
 

Baggsy

Well-known member
Site Supporter
This used to be done about every 50k on my bike, but lately I adjust mine about every other oil change. It's takes so little time to do.
Make sure you put a dab of grease on that rod. Also, if you decide to clean out the actuator, do so in a small tupperware container otherwise the ball bearings may fall out.

I like this thread as a reference point for the clutch adjustment on 1st gen DL650's.
https://www.stromtrooper.com/v-strom-service-maintenance-questions-discussions/63042-clutch-adjustment-help.html

I find it keeps the chatter down and the bike rides very smooth.
O.k. Good to know, I must have missed that thread when I was a Stromtrooper.
 

TwistedKestrel

King of GTAM
Site Supporter
I learned something about bikes today, I had no idea such a device existed. TBH I'm not 100% sure this isn't a weird prank
 

Trials

Well-known member
I learned something about bikes today, I had no idea such a device existed. TBH I'm not 100% sure this isn't a weird prank
That's just the way Suzuki has done it (possibly several others) but there are other ways to turn the pull on a cable into a push against the clutch springs.

If the mechanism develops free-play or damage to the nylon parts then clutch drag is inevitable because it can no longer convert the pull on the cable to a push on the clutch rod. An old worn cable can produce the same symptoms because the outer shield on your cable can allow some compression. Either mechanical issue can cause your clutch to turn to mush.

... if you have a hydraulic operated clutch you have no such device.
 
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JavaFan

Well-known member
Site Supporter
That's just the way Suzuki has done it (possibly several others) but there are other ways to turn the pull on a cable into a push against the clutch springs.

If the mechanism develops free-play or damage to the nylon parts then clutch drag is inevitable because it can no longer convert the pull on the cable to a push on the clutch rod. An old worn cable can produce the same symptoms because the outer shield on your cable can allow some compression. Either mechanical issue can cause your clutch to turn to mush.

... if you have a hydraulic operated clutch you have no such device.
yup, a lever has been known to work
Yamaha guys don't have those silly adjuster widgets to deal with

http://[img]https://i.imgur.com/jtnLfpl.jpg[/img]
 

Trials

Well-known member
yup, a lever has been known to work
Yamaha guys don't have those silly adjuster widgets to deal with
... and a simple cam.

Others like 1970's Montesa used a rack and pinion gear inside the primary gear oil casing <- they also had a primary type clutch, a clutch can be made smaller and lighter if you mount it on the crankshaft, downside is you can't pull in the clutch and kick start it.
 

TK4

Well-known member
Others like 1970's Montesa used a rack and pinion gear inside the primary gear oil casing <- they also had a primary type clutch, a clutch can be made smaller and lighter if you mount it on the crankshaft, downside is you can't pull in the clutch and kick start it.
Yamaha tried it too on their 60's roadracers - clutches didn't like turning at crankshaft speed, they tended to explode.
 

Trials

Well-known member
Yamaha tried it too on their 60's roadracers - clutches didn't like turning at crankshaft speed, they tended to explode.
:I don't recall those, what model bikes were they on?
 

Trials

Well-known member
Very cool!
worked good on my 360VA but that operated at much lower rpm
... & it's a wet clutch.
 
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