Bumper Cars at TMP | Page 4 | GTAMotorcycle.com

Bumper Cars at TMP

raginduck

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I wonder how that corvette owner is going to get that pile of dust home back to his house to say it burned on his driveway and scam the insurance company.
They'd have to set it on fire again for that to have a chance at working... That fire would have left significant burn marks wherever it happened... burnt car in driveway but no damage to house or actually driveway.. will raise questions.
 

BigEvilDoer

Well-known member
They'd have to set it on fire again for that to have a chance at working... That fire would have left significant burn marks wherever it happened... burnt car in driveway but no damage to house or actually driveway.. will raise questions.
Not to mention no calls to the fire department to put the fire out..
You saw how much black smoke that car made when it was burning. That would be called in about 742 times by people in the neighbourhood.
 

Brian P

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That'll buff right out.
I read somewhere he ran meth too close to the brakes. Brakes heated up, meth box lit up, the rest is history.
OK, next dumb question. I know only enough about the LT4 engine that I can glean from google (and that's because I drive cheap cars, not Corvettes). That engine is supercharged and intercooled and direct-injection. What's the purpose of adding meth injection to an engine that's already intercooled and already has direct-injection to control detonation?

Did someone speed up the supercharger pulley, perhaps? Crikey, that thing already makes 650 horsepower. And you're driving it on a tight track where you can hardly use it - in conditions where you can't use it.

quote from years ago on another internet forum ... "If you can't go fast with 90 horsepower, then having 300 horsepower isn't going to help"

But, I suppose the crowd attracted to a disorganised track day like this, wouldn't understand that.
 

Evoex

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quote from years ago on another internet forum ... "If you can't go fast with 90 horsepower, then having 300 horsepower isn't going to help"
Alright mister H2 owner, i'm calling you out.

;) :D
 

Gary

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OK, next dumb question. I know only enough about the LT4 engine that I can glean from google (and that's because I drive cheap cars, not Corvettes). That engine is supercharged and intercooled and direct-injection. What's the purpose of adding meth injection to an engine that's already intercooled and already has direct-injection to control detonation?

Did someone speed up the supercharger pulley, perhaps? Crikey, that thing already makes 650 horsepower. And you're driving it on a tight track where you can hardly use it - in conditions where you can't use it.

quote from years ago on another internet forum ... "If you can't go fast with 90 horsepower, then having 300 horsepower isn't going to help"

But, I suppose the crowd attracted to a disorganised track day like this, wouldn't understand that.
I don't get it either.
I felt 650hp was adequete.
It got me sideways on command.
 

Hardwrkr13

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Yes likely different pulley and tuned to run meth either for added protection or for a bit more hp.
 

GreyGhost

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I don't know enough about the vette engine either, but there is a possibility that in track duty it would start pulling timing even at stock power. Once the intercooler heat soaks (which is likely on a tight track with lots of hp and a packaging nightmare) it would be interesting to see what timing and hp looked like.
 

Brian P

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It's really easy to break stuff on those bikes, and really expensive when it happens. I haven't sped up the supercharger pulley (even though you can - and it breaks stuff), and I haven't added intercooling (even though you can, and should, if you speed up the supercharger pulley). The stock wheelbase pretty much precludes using stock horsepower anyhow, so why bother ...

Meanwhile, my race bike made 41.3 horsepower on the CSBK dyno.
 

Wingboy

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The more you can stuff into a cylinder, the more power. If the mixture you stuff in there is denser, same thing. Cool evening air makes more horsepower for top fuel dragsters and longer parachute rides for skydivers because the air is heavier.
 

RobVN

Well-known member
How do they compare? Pro 6 vs riders choice track days?
Pro 6 has always been concerned about rider safety and constantly stress the rules in their rider meetings. At CTMP if you are a first time rider there you will spend your day in the green group the whole day no matter your ability. In green group there is absolutely no passing in breaking zones or corners. Only on straights. Here is a video of a friend of mine who is a very good rider and has some racing experience at his first day at CTMP doing a Riders choice day;
Now if it was a Pro 6 day he would have been black flagged and pulled off the track. His passing was safe but in green group it must have scared the f*** out of some riders.
All the issues you see at this car track day could occur at a Riders choice day but would not be tolerated at a Pro 6 day. And that's not to say that Pro 6 has not had some bad days at their track days. There have been some bad incidents that have occurred at their days both at CTMP and Bogie and they really take it to heart. As Katatonic mentioned about a Riders Choice track day a couple years ago at CTMP it was a real s*** show. And when riders have to be transported in ambulances to the hospital the track is shut down so everyone loses track time. When you pay the money out like you do at CTMP and Bogie you don't want to lose a minute of track time. We all appreciate the opportunity to be out on the track but the approach can mean the difference between having fun and being safe or being hurt or worse yet.
 

RobVN

Well-known member
I had a bad experience with Pro 6 last summer. Evidently small bikes get bumped down to intermediate no matter what. I understand their thinking, although I think it's flawed. The same issue, speed differential on straightaways, still exists in intermediate, except with less-experienced riders. Simple things could have been done to address this (e.g. send the small bikes out first and give them a few seconds head start), but weren't, and I won't be back.
Brian. I hope you would approach Sandy and speak with him about this. Hopefully he can explain his logic for this. I have to agree with you. An experienced rider albeit on a smaller bike is better off in red group where the riders are more experienced. I am not the fastest rider out there but I feel comfortable in a turn at CTMP with riders passing me on both side in red group.
 

Brian P

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Did speak with him on the day of. It was a pointless discussion, and I can't be bothered taking it further. I routinely buy supplies at their shop, but I won't do another of their track days. Waste of time, money, tires, and wear and tear.

Bike is in the van ready for SOAR practice weekend - next weekend. I've never had an issue running in the Pro practice group. Granted, it's a slower track, and I know all of the other riders, which helps.
 

Brian P

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Here is a video of a friend of mine who is a very good rider and has some racing experience at his first day at CTMP doing a Riders choice day
I picked out a 1:37 lap time and that was with some interference from traffic. That video looks like he's seriously in the wrong group. Assigning someone to "green" (novice) group for a whole day does not make a whole lot of sense, either. For example, I doubt if Marc Marquez has ever turned a lap at CTMP. Would they put *him* in green group because of that? Or are rules bent depending on what your name is and who you know ... ? ? ?

Other organisations have different ways of handling this. As of right now, the last lap I turned on a racetrack was at Phillip Island on a rental bike. They have a lap timing system, and everyone has a transponder. They take an educated guess at what group to assign you to at the beginning of the day based on your prior experience, and actively move people between groups depending on how things work out. So ... first lap I ever did of Phillip Island, which is a seriously fast track, on a rental bike that I've never ridden before, was in their "medium-fast" group ("fast" group is reserved for people who have experience on that track). The only consideration for me having never been there before was putting the bike in "rain" mode for the first session. Green flag. There's the entrance road, don't cross that blend line. Go.

They also handle passing differently. "Do what you need to do, but stay 2 metres apart." Same in all groups.

I'm still here. That was an awesome experience. I won't be taking Jonathan Rae's place, but it was great to get a taste of it.
 

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