Any GTAM'ers own an electric vehicle? | Page 195 | GTAMotorcycle.com

Any GTAM'ers own an electric vehicle?

Evoex

The God
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FullMotoJacket

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PrivatePilot

Ironus Butticus
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Trolling.It would be a shame to delete this thread.
How about deleting the persistent source instead of the thread.

Quick update on the Ioniq - in just over 4 months of ownership we've put about 15,000KM on it. Zero issues whatsoever and still averaging around 12-12.5KWH/100KM which is just really awesome.
 

PrivatePilot

Ironus Butticus
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I'm struggling with that video. At the very beginning of the clip the spedometer in the video shows 73MPH and he's complaining about consumption. Then he comments about doing 75MPH later.

Nobody tows at 70++MPH and expects any sort of decent fuel economy/range.

And it's a sedan towing a broadside of a barn. Terrible aerodynamic combination.

And is a P60 or P100? "Fuel tank size" in other words.

Did they use the battery precondition function correctly to pre cool the battery before fast charging to maximize kwh rates?

He doesn't really seem to take into consideration the ability to charge the car while they're sleeping at a hotel...

They go buy food somewhere else and then drive to a charger and sit vs going to park the car and then going to eat WHILE it's charging.

They seem scared to have to backup the trailer so they're wasting time disconnecting and reconnecting...

In the YouTube comments they're stating that they couldn't dare drive any slower across WY because "the speed limit is 75!". Fallacy...they could drive 60MPH all day long and be juuuuuuust fine. I know because I've done it several times..... Excuses. They could have gained a HUGE amount of range just driving 60MPH negating a lot of charging time.

So may questions and the video seems really skewed against EV....based on a lack of understanding on a lot of things.

This is a little bit like the opposite of buying a Peterbilt and then complaining that it gets crappy fuel economy and is hard to park at the convenience store when you took it out to get a loaf of bread. It's not really the ideal piece of equipment for the job.
 

GreyGhost

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I'm struggling with that video. At the very beginning of the clip the spedometer in the video shows 73MPH and he's complaining about consumption. Then he comments about doing 75MPH later.

Nobody tows at 70++MPH and expects any sort of decent fuel economy/range.

And it's a sedan towing a broadside of a barn. Terrible aerodynamic combination.

And is a P60 or P100? "Fuel tank size" in other words.

Did they use the battery precondition function correctly to pre cool the battery before fast charging to maximize kwh rates?

He doesn't really seem to take into consideration the ability to charge the car while they're sleeping at a hotel...

They go buy food somewhere else and then drive to a charger and sit vs going to park the car and then going to eat WHILE it's charging.

They seem scared to have to backup the trailer so they're wasting time disconnecting and reconnecting...

In the YouTube comments they're stating that they couldn't dare drive any slower across WY because "the speed limit is 75!". Fallacy...they could drive 60MPH all day long and be juuuuuuust fine. I know because I've done it several times..... Excuses. They could have gained a HUGE amount of range just driving 60MPH negating a lot of charging time.

So may questions and the video seems really skewed against EV....based on a lack of understanding on a lot of things.

This is a little bit like the opposite of buying a Peterbilt and then complaining that it gets crappy fuel economy and is hard to park at the convenience store when you took it out to get a loaf of bread. It's not really the ideal piece of equipment for the job.
I agree with most of what you said, but some of it is just not practical.

Charging while sleeping? They were getting 100 miles per charge, while charging while sleeping is a good idea, realistically that only helps after you have gone a reasonable distance.

They buy food and then drive to supercharger as they seem to be in the boonies away from restaurants. Taking a taxi from your charging car to the restaurant eats most of your savings.

from tflcar.com
"Per the EPA, the 2019 Tesla Model X Long Range can manage up to 325 miles on a single charge. Completely unladen, the car has no trouble managing that distance with plenty of range to spare. In fact, traveling at 70 mph on Interstate 76 in Colorado, the car managed to use 19.3 kWh of electricity, or about 21 percent of its total capacity. " (over a 66 mile loop)
So the range at 70 mph while not towing is ~315 miles. Dropping to 100 miles while towing a small barn seems like an awfully big hit. I wonder if this is strictly aero, or if the car drops into a less efficient drive mode to provide the necessary added power?

They obviously don't entirely understand aero based on their comments about the roof tent.

I would have liked them to try to tow at 60 mph and see how it went. I suspect their trip time may not have changed as they would have used less kw/mile and needed to charge less often. It may still have been a failed experiment as going up to 150 mile range still blows.

I think the real conclusion is you cannot yet use an EV like you would use an ICE vehicle. If you limited your speed, bought an aero trailer (do they even exist yet?) and had lots of time, it may be possible to make long journeys, but you are operating well outside of the EV's intended use case and it shows.
 

Brian P

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Still ... Tesla provides a towing capacity for the vehicle, and they were well within it. "What happens if you try" is something Tesla doesn't address. This does - and this trailer was nowhere near the rated towing capacity. (With this trailer, it used about double the energy of the vehicle itself. With the earlier test of a bigger trailer that did approach the rated limits, it used about 3 times the energy.) It is also apparent that Tesla's native range-estimating / trip planning software doesn't address this.

There has been some buzz about electric pickup trucks from other manufacturers, and perhaps this serves as an advance-warning reality check.
 

GreyGhost

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Still ... Tesla provides a towing capacity for the vehicle, and they were well within it. "What happens if you try" is something Tesla doesn't address. This does - and this trailer was nowhere near the rated towing capacity. (With this trailer, it used about double the energy of the vehicle itself. With the earlier test of a bigger trailer that did approach the rated limits, it used about 3 times the energy.) It is also apparent that Tesla's native range-estimating / trip planning software doesn't address this.

There has been some buzz about electric pickup trucks from other manufacturers, and perhaps this serves as an advance-warning reality check.
Based on this, if you want a electric truck that can usefully tow, you are probably on the wrong side of 200K. They have lots of space for more batteries in a truck, it just makes the price crazy. Definitely going to be lots of parking lot princesses that look like trucks soon.
 

PrivatePilot

Ironus Butticus
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I agree that there's not an equivalency (yet) when it comes to filling up a gas car vs charging an electric, but some common sense needs to used as well. I've never seen a supercharger in the boonies - to the contrary Tesla virtually HAS to place them in very built-up areas because of the sheer energy demands that a row of massive kw chargers require. Most have (at the very least) fast food within walking distance. When we brought our Ioniq back from Montreal every single 1 of our charging stops had food within a 30 second walk - heck, one fast charger was actually in a restaurant parking lot.

And ferchristsakes, slooooow down. I lose my mind when I hear the fallacy of "I can't go slow, people will be pushing me!". I have several decades of commercial and recreational driving experience under my belt that proves that wrong...it is NOT an excuse for driving fast and then complaining about your fuel economy after the fact.

As for what will happen when electric pickup trucks come out, yeah...they'll need lots and lots of kwh's, simple. Remember, Tesla has electric semi's on the road. It can be done. But they're built for the task - they're not trying to pull semi trailers with a P100D and then complaining that the outcome is lacklustre.

Remember...a regular gas pickup truck can easily lose half it's fuel economy when pulling a trailer as well, even with the pickup moving more air out of the way of the trailer vs a sedan.

Hookup that same trailer behind something like a Chevy Impala and it too would get dismal fuel economy at 75MPH because of the same wind resistance combination of the Tesla. That trailer is an aerodynamic nightmare - flat front, a big chunky spare tire hanging on the tongue screwing up airflow even more, big balloon tires sticking outside the structure of the trailer itself, and a high ride height. Just about ANY other trailer with some basic aerodynamics would yield better results. Better yet, a popup/tent trailer that rides IN the cars slipstream would yield drastically less consumption, the same as how tent trailers don't reduce MPG on a gas car the same as a traditional travel trailer, much less that box on wheels.
 

PrivatePilot

Ironus Butticus
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BTW, "towing capacity" is really not the be all end all people think it is when it comes to its effect on fuel economy. That trailer could weigh 10,000# but if it rode in the cars slipstream it would only dramatically increase consumption during acceleration or terrain - the rest of the time it would be minimal.

But put a 500# utility trailer with an 8x10 piece of plywood across the front of it and you have the polar opposite...it will pull like a lead sled at anything north of 55MPH.

And therein lies their other problem...they just don't get how MUCH effect that fugly box design plus their speeds are having on their results.



The weight isn't the problem...it's the wind resistance.
 

Riceburner

Well-known member
El Camino crossed with a CRV? A modern Ute?


****edit***
Ah, the new Ridgeline. Thought it was smaller. At least the bed sides are level.
 
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MSRP

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Came back a few weeks ago after a solo "Camping in California" with a well-used, 2015 Model S 85D with 150,000km.
Wonderful experience chasing mountain tops, 2500km over 4 days, full autopilot even in the canyons. Autopilot was a lifesaver on the late-night stints and when stuck in gridlock. After a day of trial and error, I could accurately predict scenarios where it would have issues.
Lots of fun, camped in the back with ac and full heat where needed.

Luckily, no issues at all. Silly fella even had Michelin Pilot Super Sports on them with decent tread. Gobs of fun in the sweeping canyons, and even more fun in the twisties with elevation. (what I would give to experience the same elevation and twisties here in Ontario)

The trip planner did want me to take a 2.5hour detour from Big Sur back to LAX as it didn't think it had enough range for PCH down the coast, but luckily I made some mental math and looked at google's pedestrian mode to gauge the elevation change (25,000' up and 25,000' down) and took the gamble. No issues with 250miles of average range.

If one were able to stomach the potential delays if requiring bodywork and can overlook the puzzling build quality, I would highly recommend picking up a used Model S.
 

MSRP

Well-known member
No matter how fast EVs can lap a track, they will never have the soul or sound of an ICE
Can't hear ya in the rear view mirror. I agree 100%, but driving through Cali with a Model S, I didn't once wish I had a 911 or M-car instead.
Ok I lied, maybe during the tunnel runs through Yosemite valley, but that was a very tiny portion of the trip.
 

K20EF8

Well-known member
Can't hear ya in the rear view mirror. I agree 100%, but driving through Cali with a Model S, I didn't once wish I had a 911 or M-car instead.
Ok I lied, maybe during the tunnel runs through Yosemite valley, but that was a very tiny portion of the trip.
Im not denying their efficiency or practicality but as an enthusiast they will never have the soul of a 12 cylinder '60s Ferrari nor the sound of a v12 or v10 Formula one engine.
Teslas are trendy appliances.
No enthusiast would prefer driving down the 101 in a Model-S rather than a 911 GT3-RS, Cayman GT4 etc :p
 

Lunatic

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Im not denying their efficiency or practicality but as an enthusiast they will never have the soul of a 12 cylinder '60s Ferrari nor the sound of a v12 or v10 Formula one engine.
Teslas are trendy appliances.
No enthusiast would prefer driving down the 101 in a Model-S rather than a 911 GT3-RS, Cayman GT4 etc :p
I'm all for keeping a fun car for specific drives and leisure use, but after 2 years of driving an EV daily I can't imagine ever going back to a non-EV as a daily driver. My Bolt has far more usable performance than my CTS-V did for 99% of the driving most people ever do. I will always love the joy of driving a sweet sporty car and hearing a great engine roar but now it just seems antiquated, like watching a WW2 era warplane fly by.
 

HDRod

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Im not denying their efficiency or practicality but as an enthusiast they will never have the soul of a 12 cylinder '60s Ferrari nor the sound of a v12 or v10 Formula one engine.
Teslas are trendy appliances.
No enthusiast would prefer driving down the 101 in a Model-S rather than a 911 GT3-RS, Cayman GT4 etc :p
Just curious, how many Teslas have you driven?
 

MSRP

Well-known member
Im not denying their efficiency or practicality but as an enthusiast they will never have the soul of a 12 cylinder '60s Ferrari nor the sound of a v12 or v10 Formula one engine.
Teslas are trendy appliances.
No enthusiast would prefer driving down the 101 in a Model-S rather than a 911 GT3-RS, Cayman GT4 etc :p
Sure, probably because GT3-RS money also begets a Model S 100D Performance in the garage for the "non manual / DD duty".
Traffic over there.. my lord.
In Toronto? I 100% would Model S > v12 whatever. What we have within 2-3 hours of a drive as "fun roads" pale in comparison to the elevation and scenery of California. Sad, flat Ontario.. good thing we have other benefits of Canada to offset that deep void.
 

Mad Mike

Well-known member
...
No enthusiast would prefer driving down the 101 in a Model-S rather than a 911 GT3-RS, Cayman GT4 etc :p
No enthusiast is driving the 101, it's marginally more exciting than the 401 between Toronto and Montreal.

Methinks you mean California 1.
 

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