2003 CBR600RR Chain and Sprockets!!! | GTAMotorcycle.com

2003 CBR600RR Chain and Sprockets!!!

Avanobi

Member
Hello there! i'm newbie here and I have a question about Chain and Sprockets. Its winter on the way and time to do some maintenance and fixing everything. So I read a little bit about 520 chain conversion with -1 +2. My question is what brand do you suggest? I don't need crazy expensive kit, just good for price and quality. Also working in the shop, so I want to do it by myself.
 

Trials

Well-known member
Hello there! i'm newbie here and I have a question about Chain and Sprockets. Its winter on the way and time to do some maintenance and fixing everything. So I read a little bit about 520 chain conversion with -1 +2. My question is what brand do you suggest? I don't need crazy expensive kit, just good for price and quality. Also working in the shop, so I want to do it by myself.
I think it would be crazy to buy something like that as a kit unless it saves you some coin over buying the 3 parts independently.
Are you asking what brand of chain is best?
That's probably like asking what brand of engine oil is best, you're going to get a lot of brand loyalty opinions and very little solid evidence that there is a bad one.
And why on earth do you want to gear down your sportbike?
 

TK4

Well-known member
Hello there! i'm newbie here and I have a question about Chain and Sprockets. Its winter on the way and time to do some maintenance and fixing everything. So I read a little bit about 520 chain conversion with -1 +2. My question is what brand do you suggest? I don't need crazy expensive kit, just good for price and quality. Also working in the shop, so I want to do it by myself.
Do the chain and sprockets need replacement as a matter of regular maintenance ?
If not, why bother ?
A 520 chain is narrower than the 530 it came with, do you need the tire clearance ?
If not why bother ?
As Avanobi has related to, is there a reason for altering the overall gear ratio ?
If not, why bother ?
Do you have the necessary chain breaking and riveting tools, do you want to add to your expense ?
If not, why bother ?
Its a 15 year old bike, ride it, have fun with it and replace what's worn out or broken (IMHO)....
 

Riceburner

Well-known member
For street riding there is no reason to swap to a 520 unless it's to save a few $$. A dremel or cut off disk will take care of the removal of the old chain. If you don't have a rivet tool, you can get the screw type master link with EK chains. http://www.ekchain.jp/feature/ (scroll to near bottom of the page) They could use a spell checker though.
You heed only an 8mm wrench and a pair of pliers.
 

Avanobi

Member
Do the chain and sprockets need replacement as a matter of regular maintenance ?
If not, why bother ?
A 520 chain is narrower than the 530 it came with, do you need the tire clearance ?
If not why bother ?
As Avanobi has related to, is there a reason for altering the overall gear ratio ?
If not, why bother ?
Do you have the necessary chain breaking and riveting tools, do you want to add to your expense ?
If not, why bother ?
Its a 15 year old bike, ride it, have fun with it and replace what's worn out or broken (IMHO)....
It is matter of maintenance. Chain is stretched and sprockets are worn out. Also I would like to get more acceleration and low end. Any suggestion for that?
I know a lot of people do 520 conversion -1 +2 and I know i will lose my top speed. I don't mind to buy riveting tools as long as i can do this work by myself and probably do that for customers or even my friends. If you have any recommendations for that, I would be happy to know.
 

Avanobi

Member
I think it would be crazy to buy something like that as a kit unless it saves you some coin over buying the 3 parts independently.
Are you asking what brand of chain is best?
That's probably like asking what brand of engine oil is best, you're going to get a lot of brand loyalty opinions and very little solid evidence that there is a bad one.
And why on earth do you want to gear down your sportbike?
I understand your point, but what you mean to gear down? Sorry, I'm newcomer about sportbike.
 

Brian P

Well-known member
Moderator
Site Supporter
"Gear down" = shorter final drive ratio (which is what you are proposing to do).

If the chain and sprockets need replacement anyhow then you might as well fine tune the ratio as you propose.

DID and EK chains are well regarded. My choice would be a DID 520 ERV3 X ring chain. Sunstar and Renthal sprockets are good but there are others. Don't cheap out. If you opt for an aluminum sprocket, make sure it is hard anodized. I've had good life out of hard anodized aluminum sprockets. The correct alloy is 7075 T6.

Use a riveted master link. You will need some tools to do this installation: A grinder to grind the pins off one of the links in the old chain, a chain breaker, and a chain riveting tool. Motion Pro sells these. It is also pretty likely that you will need air tools to get the old countershaft sprocket off.

By the time you've spent this money on tools, you have paid someone experienced to do it.

If you foresee staying in motorcycling for the long term, by all means get the tools. I have all of the above and plenty more. (I don't do work for others, though.)
 

Trials

Well-known member
I understand your point, but what you mean to gear down? Sorry, I'm newcomer about sportbike.
Your bike will not achieve as much top speed, you will be shifting more often.
Bike may not end up actually being faster in practice unless you are maybe planning to race at shannonville.
If switching to a smaller chain is to save weight and improve performance then you might as well switch to a plain roller chain that requires regular maintenance. aka race chain. Race chain will be about half the cost of a maintenance free sealed chain. If you are new to sportbike riding you seriously don't need more power and a few ounces less chain weight for street riding, that bike is capable of amazing race performance in the hands of a skilled rider :| if you want to seriously go faster upgrade the rider ;)

... next season I'm going to be switching my MV to a plain roller chain with a cir-clip master link. (lol living dangerously) I won't care what the chain brand is, will be buying it on spec and staying with the stock sprockets, the gearing is great. Your rear sprocket should be wearing out much slower then your countershaft sprocket unless the countershaft sprocket is steel and the rear is aluminum. The thing that kills your sprockets is running a worn out chain, to know how much your chain is stretched lay it along side a new one and compare their length, usable lifespan ends at a measly 3 or 4 % stretch. Maintenance free chains only need enough lubrication stop the outside surfaces from rusting, standard roller chain need frequent cleaning and lubrication to disperse water from the pins and remove abrasive grit. That is both the advantage and the disadvantage of a plain chain which when properly serviced actually rolls much easier then a brand new sealed chain. With a cir-clip master link you need virtually no special tools ever to remove it and reinstall it. You can even lengthen the chain with an extra master link if you want to run a monster over-sized rear sprocket and turn it into a stunt bike that is slow enough to walk behind.
To remove your worn out endless chain, all you really need is a grinder or hand file or a hacksaw.

... & you do realize the smaller weaker chain size is going to wear out faster :|
and you won't know how many links to buy so you will need to buy it longer and then cut it to custom length
unless somebody knows that stuff from experience.
 
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Brian P

Well-known member
Moderator
Site Supporter
Because it is a big nut with a high torque and is probably seized. You can fight with hand tools and trying to figure out how to deal with the torque reaction...or knock it off in two seconds with an air impact.
 

TwistedKestrel

King of GTAM
Site Supporter
+1 have done it the stupid way, would not recommend
 

Riceburner

Well-known member
Remove the front sprocket first. Leave the chain on, stick a 2x4 thru the rear wheel to prevent turning and use a long extension on the ratchet. Easy enough. But if you have access to air tools, then easier.
 

Jayell

Well-known member
Delboy demonstrates his method of "pinning" the chain, 11:44. Watch also, as he removes the CS sprocket with hand tools and seemingly little effort, 13:50.

[video=youtube_share;UxD3qdD7LhE]https://youtu.be/UxD3qdD7LhE?t=704[/video]
 

Riceburner

Well-known member
The tapping is a good idea. Delboy has lots of good info. Pinning the chain is good too if you already removed the wheel and didn't loosen the nut beforehand.
 

Trials

Well-known member
Because it is a big nut with a high torque and is probably seized. You can fight with hand tools and trying to figure out how to deal with the torque reaction...or knock it off in two seconds with an air impact.
:D or give it to Delboy and he will have it off before you can fire up the air compressor.

High torque :lol:
I had to replace a sprocket and reinstall a chain just last week,
the sprocket on it's own weighs more then your entire motorcycle. It was a fight with hand tools and trying to figure out how to deal with not being crushed by the chain or the sprocket.

 

Sadz

Well-known member
Site Supporter
:D or give it to Delboy and he will have it off before you can fire up the air compressor.

High torque :lol:
I had to replace a sprocket and reinstall a chain just last week,
the sprocket on it's own weighs more then your entire motorcycle. It was a fight with hand tools and trying to figure out how to deal with not being crushed by the chain or the sprocket.

Ahh yes...last years Harley Ultra (steel belt conversion kit)
To add to the conversation though...I had a couple of the same bike. I went down 1 in the front. Pulled well and didnt feel like a knob running around town at 11000 rpm. Try to change just the drive first...you can always do the driven later.
 
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Riceburner

Well-known member
Also have a couple of the same bikes. One geared -1 in front and one +1 in front from stock. Each moves the RPMs 500 above or below stock. One has better gas mileage(marginally) and the other is a bit more fun to giv'er, plus it's the one with a pipe. :)
 

boyoboy

Well-known member
For street riding there is no reason to swap to a 520 unless it's to save a few $$. A dremel or cut off disk will take care of the removal of the old chain. If you don't have a rivet tool, you can get the screw type master link with EK chains. http://www.ekchain.jp/feature/ (scroll to near bottom of the page) They could use a spell checker though.
^ This is good; if you aren't interested in collecting tools you might use once every few years- the EK screw type master link will work well.
Borrow a dremel or cut off disk.

otherwise pay a tech.

turning wrenches can be rewarding...and having a mechanically inclined friend to help is a good thing- two heads are better than one.

the lower gearing you have suggested is a large change. I wouldn't add more than 2 - 4 teeth at the rear for street riding, and keep the countershaft # teeth stock. but this is only my opinion.

EDIT
Ari henning has some very good "how to" videos that are worth looking at- Search "Ari henning, MC garage" for a look/see. good stuff.
 
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Avanobi

Member
So finally decide to buy 525 pitch chain and steel sprockets 16/43 which is original gear ratio. For me doesn't make any sense to do 520 conversion for city riding. Anyway I will change spark plugs and air filter too. Also will be paint in different color. Thanks everyone for advice.
 

Sadz

Well-known member
Site Supporter
Quick and fairly cheap to try 1 down in the front...fun factor. Think you can get one for under $25. Pulled better.
 

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