Why aren't Ninja HR2 street legal in Ontario? | Page 2 | GTAMotorcycle.com

Why aren't Ninja HR2 street legal in Ontario?

Evoex

The God
Site Supporter
Meh if your ok going the route of insane insurance payments, Id get a liter bike over the H2 any day.
It will still be faster than anything on the road, and about 100 lbs lighter.


Engine dictates acceleration

Weight dictates handling, acceleration, and braking.
We'll see about insurance when the time comes. Going to be another 4 years min anyways.
 

killvino

Well-known member

J_F

gringo diablo
Site Supporter
sure you can do the mods to address all the Transport Canada safety standards
but you still don't have a registration for the bike
and you will never get one
SO will run the VIN and give you a nahhhh, nice try, no plates for you
 

GreyGhost

Well-known member
Site Supporter
sure you can do the mods to address all the Transport Canada safety standards
but you still don't have a registration for the bike
and you will never get one
SO will run the VIN and give you a nahhhh, nice try, no plates for you
You'd have to go the other way. Buy an H2 and the $100,000 (just a guess) in parts to covert it to an H2R. Bingo, bango, street titled H2R. Risky to ride though. Telling the insurance company the mods have doubled the power and cost much more than the original bike probably leaves you with no insurance. Not telling them may leave with with no insurance if they investigate a crash or a cheque for the price of a stock H2 if you get lucky.
 

Roadghost

Well-known member
Does anyone know why the Ninja H2R is not street legal in Ontario? The H2 is, but not H2R. Are they afraid people will kill themselves, on it, because it has a top speed of 400 km/h?
The H2 has all the power anyone including the professional racers would ever be able to use on a public highway. I can't see why you would want a street legal H2R when you could never use it to its full potential on the street anyway.
 

Flywheel

Well-known member
"The H2R wasn't designed to go fast, it was designed to separate the men from the boys."

--Translation from the Japanese press-kit when the H2R launched in 2015.
 

smergy

Well-known member
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They are loud and astonishingly so. I've heard a lot of loud race bikes but after behind one on the back straight at mosport on a brand new (2016 at the time) S1000RR with all the fun bits, it was unreal. And it just walks away, like I'm on a 600. I feel bad for the race slicks on that thing, they have their work cut out. A bit porky, but its definitely a cool machine.
 

油井緋色

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Rossi86

Well-known member
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The H2R was never designed to be street legal ANYwhere. It's not just Ontario.

It does not have a headlight.
It does not have a functional muffler (it does not meet ANYone's noise level standards for road use).
It does not have a catalyst (necessary for emissions compliance in this day and age). And the cam timing and engine tuning is such that even if the H2's catalyst- and muffler-equipped exhaust system were to be installed, it would burn the catalyst out in no time.
It does not have a license plate bracket or rear fender.
It does not have mirrors.
It does not have turn signals.
It does not have reflectors.
It's shipped with slicks.
It doesn't comply with the "gentleman's agreement" on top speed restrictions in Europe. It will exceed 300 km/h and the speedometer will show it, too.
And most importantly, due to all of the above, it is not supplied with the declaration of conformity to applicable motor vehicle safety standards that is necessary for the vehicle registration authorities to license it for road use.
So basically, install lights & signals front and back, change tires to DOT, install rear fender and licence plate bracket, remove Kawasaki and H2R stickers, declare HOMEBUILT, and get very cheap insurance FTW :D
 

hedo2002

Well-known member
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Glad you THINK, it is that simple. Go ahead, do what your suggesting and go to SO, then tell us why you weren't able to skip out the door with registration and plates in hand...lmao

Getting a "home built" motor vehicle is NO WHERE as simple to register, as is a home built trailer.... But nice try.

There is a reason people don't buy Salvage branded bikes and just put new parts on and skip into MTO declaring it Home built, and skip out wioth plates in hand...

So basically, install lights & signals front and back, change tires to DOT, install rear fender and licence plate bracket, remove Kawasaki and H2R stickers, declare HOMEBUILT, and get very cheap insurance FTW :D
 
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Rossi86

Well-known member
Site Supporter
Glad you THINK, it is that simple. Go ahead, do what your suggesting and go to SO, then tell us why you weren't able to skip out the door with registration and plates in hand...lmao

Getting a "home built" motor vehicle is NO WHERE as simple to register, as is a home built trailer.... But nice try.

There is a reason people don't buy Salvage branded bikes and just put new parts on and skip into MTO declaring it Home built, and skip out wioth plates in hand...
If I were in the market for a bike of that cost, I wouldn't be buying an H2R but a proper race spec Jap or European superbike. And it would not be ridden on the street, but what it was built for...

If you're determined to put an H2R on the street and you have that kind of money to buy one, it would not be that hard to pass it along for an H2 and register it. The question is not if it can be put on the street or not, but WHY would anyone want one for the street, are the Timmies meet ups really getting this fancy nowadays?
 

Wingboy

Well-known member
Moderator
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If I were in the market for a bike of that cost, I wouldn't be buying an H2R but a proper race spec Jap or European superbike. And it would not be ridden on the street, but what it was built for...

If you're determined to put an H2R on the street and you have that kind of money to buy one, it would not be that hard to pass it along for an H2 and register it. The question is not if it can be put on the street or not, but WHY would anyone want one for the street, are the Timmies meet ups really getting this fancy nowadays?
Exactly.Rather be shot out of a cannon than squeezed out of a tube.
 

Roadghost

Well-known member
I think the way to go if you simply must have one, is to get a street legal Ninja H2 frame and transfer everything to it. The numbers would then be registerable.
 

Roadghost

Well-known member
... except it's known how to make an H2 faster than an H2R.

Someone just (couple days ago) did 233.9 mph at the Texas Mile on one. (213.1 mph in the half mile on the way there, too.)

https://www.facebook.com/ChrisBurnsTBL/videos/pcb.1152745144904400/1982673855105446/?type=3&theater&ifg=1

Stock wheelbase, too ... short shifting through the first three gears despite the taaaalllll gearing needed for running that top speed.
Impressive. Not sure what all the differences are in the two bikes. Kawasaki surely isn't telling. I see he used taller gearing, but does the H2R do it that way or is it doing it with higher RPMs from a better breathing engine and more boost? IMO the stock H2, which I genuinely love and would own if I was a race bike person, is surely a real handful for the best of hobby racers even on the track. I can't see going H2R for anything but prize money on a track.
 

Brian P

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Moderator
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It's actually fairly well known what the differences are between the production H2 and H2R. The important ones are: Rev limit (14,000 vs 13,000), cam timing (substantial), the R has a lower compression ratio achieved by a higher deck height on the block (cylinder head and pistons are the same), ECU tuning, tires (DOT vs slicks). The bodywork is different despite looking similar. The R has the air filter up front where the street one's headlight housing is, and the street one has the air filter at the supercharger inlet, but despite this, the street one's intake configuration is not restrictive and this is not a limiting factor.

What the aftermarket has figured out, is how to build an intercooler into the stock (pressurized) airbox. That has allowed regearing the supercharger to spin it faster for more boost without melting down (most of the time).

I know of someone local who had one that was tuned and intercooled, and blew it up, but it was a connecting rod that let go, not a piston meltdown (which happened a few times before the intercooling got figured out). That bike had a hard life, with lots of dragstrip and top speed runs. It has been rebuilt, now with Carillo rods and who knows what else. Same shop rebuilt that one, which built the one in the video above ...
 

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