what to buy? | Page 2 | GTAMotorcycle.com

what to buy?

Trials

Well-known member
Do you do your own service?
Between the RT and the FJR, I know which one I would rather do the valve adjustment on.
 

PrivatePilot

Ironus Butticus
Site Supporter
Street glide special looks sweet too
If you're indeed actually entertaining the cruiser market and passenger comfort is top of mind for the long trips (and just tons and tons of storage) get a full decker with the beer box. Big wraparound comfortable backrest for your passenger, and a bunch of extra lockable and watertight storage for those long trips, too. I have basically the metric equivalent of a Street Glide and storage for long trips is always an issue - basically, you strap stuff on everywhere you can and waterproof it as best you can.

Harley vs one of the metric equivalents, well...your call. Depends on if the HD name catchet means anything to you and is worth the Harley tax at purchase, and at service. Same issue people are mentioning with regards to the beemer vs the FJR. ;)
 

ruffriders

Well-known member
2020 Goldwing tour $31,599
2020 Road Glide Limited $32,599
not sure the difference would make me choose, more preference,
regardless i would look at the bagger style, not the beer box
 

SeeThruHead

Member
Most 'adventure' bikes are better on road than off, and make great alternatives to gold wings. V-strom 1000 makes an amazing on road long distance tourer. The new triumph 900 GT also looks amazing.
 

BigEvilDoer

Well-known member
Triumph Rocket 3?
Muscle, comfort and unique styling.
 

blackcamaro

Well-known member
I really like Harley baggers, on my second one right now. I would also take a look at the new Indian Challenger if I was shopping right now.
 

Mad Mike

Well-known member
You can't beat the industry standard sport tourers. FJR, Connie are my first choices - dependable, sporty, fast and comfortable for 2. If you're not spooked by Euro bikes, Ducati, KTM, BMW and Guzzi all offer big STs.

Don't rule out some ADV type bikes. The ADV category is loosely defined IMHO, it has more or less annexed the "dual sport" which includes bikes There are reaThey are durable, mile eaters many setup for comfortable 2 up touring. , running twisties and piling up weekend miles. Te

Midweight STs are a great option, there are lots of choices in the 650-1000 range. I'm not as up to speed on the midweights .
Do you do your own service?
Between the RT and the FJR, I know which one I would rather do the valve adjustment on.
Me? FJR. I know dozens of riders who had never done one in 100+K, I know nobody who has ever had to do an adjustment. I do them at 50 K, and say DOH! every time -- it's just a waste of 6 hours. I also never have to replace regular BMW RT parts shaft drive parts, ujoints, tranny input shaft bearings, cruise controls, cooling fans, alternators. FJRs are Yamaha bulletproof - in 12 years and 100K I have -- not replaced a single part other than tires, 1 battery, spark plugs, brake pads and fluids.
 

Hardwrkr13

Well-known member
Site Supporter
I did 10yrs on sportbikes, 4yrs also with a bagger, and now I'm on an ADV bike (Ducati Multistrada) after the bagger left me wanting some sportiness back whilst still being all-day comfy for myself and my passenger.
Whether you go Bagger, ST, or ADV, you're going to want that topbox especially with a passenger. Having a backrest was essential for my wife (not just for comfort, but also for feeling safe) and being able to toss two helmets in there is just too darn convenient.
Baggers are great but the floorboards will touch down easily so you've got to be willing to make that compromise in the corners. I could keep up with anything on Ontario roads/corners but another trip to TN/NC was enough to miss some sportiness.
I looked at every ST new and used but couldn't fall in love with anything. I really wanted to love the Concours or FJR but just found them too ugly.
Most ADV bikes never go off the asphalt (mine stays clean as well) but they're all day comfy, the right ones are great 2-up rides, and can still be very playfull.
 

Trials

Well-known member
Longitudinal engine layout has a mechanical advantage for shaft drive anything, one less 90 degree turn in the powertrain is not insignificant for the same reason a traverse mounted engine has a mechanical advantage driving a chain.
BMW and Moto Guzzi feature a paralever type rear suspension that reduces or eliminates rear wheel hop inherent in a regular direct shaft drive units and the telelever front suspension reduces or eliminates nose dive during normal to heavy braking.

12 years you say Mike :LOL: if that is the measure of being bulletproof, my BMW turns 34 this year and when I'm done with it I will be leaving it to my 1 year old grand child. (you won't be going 34 years without a valve clearance adjustment)
 
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unL33T

Well-known member
I just notice you said no ADV bike.. but they are really really good on the road too. they arent just solely DAKAR machines they can do it all.

all the besr
Always heard ADV bikes are terrible for real off road stuff. Not that I'd know.

I also have little knowledge in this category but if it was me I'd probably be looking at a VFR800 but that's because I generally prefer smaller bikes than smaller engines so I don't need a 1000+cc beast.
 

Mad Mike

Well-known member
Longitudinal engine layout has a mechanical advantage for shaft drive anything, one less 90 degree turn in the powertrain is not insignificant for the same reason a traverse mounted engine has a mechanical advantage driving a chain.
BMW and Moto Guzzi feature a paralever type rear suspension that reduces or eliminates rear wheel hop inherent in a regular direct shaft drive units and the telelever front suspension reduces or eliminates nose dive during normal to heavy braking.

12 years you say Mike :LOL: if that is the measure of being bulletproof, my BMW turns 34 this year and when I'm done with it I will be leaving it to my 1 year old grand child. (you won't be going 34 years without a valve clearance adjustment)
12 years and 100K is a pretty good run for a bike to stay in spec with zero repairs -- just maintenance. I have a couple of old gals in the garage too, my Yamaha XV920r was born in 1981 (she's 39) and my Honda GL1000 in 76 (she's 44) -- neither have had major repairs (except starter on the XV)-- I'd trust hopping on either of them for a coast to coast tour.
 

Chris-CJ

Well-known member
12 years and 100K is a pretty good run for a bike to stay in spec with zero repairs -- just maintenance. I have a couple of old gals in the garage too, my Yamaha XV920r was born in 1981 (she's 39) and my Honda GL1000 in 76 (she's 44) -- neither have had major repairs (except starter on the XV)-- I'd trust hopping on either of them for a coast to coast tour.
From experience and what I have seen and heard, most Japanese and Euro bikes ridden within their design limits are reliable and some are easier to work on than the others. "Cost" and "availability of parts", is where the divergence is.
With across the frame (twins and fours, sixes excluded), the vibration that creeps in at certain rpms, has been a negative for me. The V-twins (of recent manufacture) and flat twins (since their conception), do not have this.
IMO, it is the package (suspension, red line rpm, torque, seating/pegs/handlebars) that dictates suitability to one's individual riding style.
.... think I am preaching to the choir :)
 

rinomato1

Well-known member
Always heard ADV bikes are terrible for real off road stuff. Not that I'd know.

I also have little knowledge in this category but if it was me I'd probably be looking at a VFR800 but that's because I generally prefer smaller bikes than smaller engines so I don't need a 1000+cc beast.
I had both 950 and 990 adv and to mr the 950 was the most rugged true to form DAKAR machine. the 990 then developed some proper handling and road manners. such is evolution lol
 

Mad Mike

Well-known member
From experience and what I have seen and heard, most Japanese and Euro bikes ridden within their design limits are reliable and some are easier to work on than the others. "Cost" and "availability of parts", is where the divergence is.
...
Dependability too -- it's a big part of TCO. It's tough for a Euro bike manufacturer to get to the dependability levels of Japanese bikes -- they simply don't have the volume to warrant the extensive testing in manufacturing and design. Also, most Euro bikes outsource suspension, brakes, fuel delivery, electrics/electronics, and engine management systems -- they don't have 100% design and manufacturing control. Japanese bike manufacturers own the companies that design & build most of their parts.

It's hard to believe that it took most Euro bike manufacturers 20 years to figure out the impact of methanol on gas tanks and fuel delivery systems.

Earlier this year I hear
 

Chris-CJ

Well-known member
Dependability too -- it's a big part of TCO. It's tough for a Euro bike manufacturer to get to the dependability levels of Japanese bikes -- they simply don't have the volume to warrant the extensive testing in manufacturing and design. Also, most Euro bikes outsource suspension, brakes, fuel delivery, electrics/electronics, and engine management systems -- they don't have 100% design and manufacturing control. Japanese bike manufacturers own the companies that design & build most of their parts.

It's hard to believe that it took most Euro bike manufacturers 20 years to figure out the impact of methanol on gas tanks and fuel delivery systems.

Earlier this year I hear
Very true, glad you mentioned the "dependability".
I believe that both Japanese and Euro mfrs outsource bits such as suspension ( think, Sachs, Ohlins) and brakes (think, Brembo).
Heard it on the grapevine that Triumph uses mfrs in Thailand and India. The small capacity KTM and BMW models are built in India. Not sure if Harley is in that same boat. Nothing wrong with that except that you mostly get what you pay for (think, "call centers).
My previous bike (Suzi M90) was built in Japan and for the 11 years I had the bike, all it needed was oil changes, yes this one has a shaft drive with it's 'paraphenlia'.
I now ride a Euro bike that has set the standards for longevity (wink, wink, nudge, nudge, think "34 years", from a previous post). It is simple to work on and service is inexpensive unless you take it to a dealer.
Confession: I have to go to a Dealer as I do not have that thingy to reset the maintenance minder.
:)
 

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