T-clock (Pre trip Inspection Routines) | GTAMotorcycle.com

T-clock (Pre trip Inspection Routines)

Wingboy

Well-known member
Moderator
Site Supporter
Wow there's a lot of new riders on the site this year.Maybe we should make a sticky for this check list for them.It could help elimanate a lot of repitious reposts. Ride safe noobs,learn slowly. Ric.

T-CLOCK Inspection Item What to check What to look for Check-off
T - Tires and Wheels Front Rear
Tires Condition Tread depth, wear, weathering, evenly seated, bulges, imbedded objects F R
Air pressure Check when cold, adjust to load/speed F R
Wheels Spokes Bent, broken, missing, tension,
check at top of wheel: "ring"=ok--"thud"= loose spoke F R
Cast Cracks, dents F R
Rims Out of round/true - 5mm, spin wheel, index against stationary pointer F R
Bearings Grab top and bottom of tire and flex: no freeplay (click) between hub and axle, no growl when spinning F R
Seals Cracked, cut, or torn, excessive grease on outside, reddish-brown around outside F R
C - Controls
Levers Condition Broken, bent, cracked, mounts tight, ball ends on handlebar lever F R
Pivots Lubricated
Cables Condition Fraying, kinks, lubrication: ends and length
Routing No interference or pulling at steering head, suspension, no sharp angles, wire looms on place.
Hoses Condition Cuts, cracks, leaks, bulges, chafing, deterioration
Routing No interference or pulling at steering head, suspension, no sharp angles, wire looms on place.
Throttle Operation Moves freely, snaps closed, no revving
L - Lights and Electrical
Battery Condition Terminals, clean and tight, electrolyte level, held down securely
Vent tube Not kinked, routed properly, not plugged
Lenses Condition Cracked, broken, securely mounted, exessive condensation
Reflectors Condition Cracked, broken, securely mounted
Wiring Condition Fraying, chafing, insulation
Routing Pinched, no interference or pulling at steering head or suspension, wire looms and ties in place, connectors tight and clean
Headlamp Condition Cracks, reflector, mounting and adjustment system
Aim Height and right/left
O - Oil and Fluids
Levels Engine oil Check warm on centerstand, dipstick, sight glass
Hypoid gear oil Transmission, rear driver, shaft
Hydraulic Fluid Brakes, clutch, reservoir or sight glass
Coolant Reservoir and/or coolant recovery tank - cool only
Fuel Tank or guage
Leaks Engine oil Gaskets, housings, seals
Hypoid gear oil Gaskets, seals and breathers
Hydraulic Fluid Hoses, master cylinders, calipers
Coolant Radiator, hoses, tanks, fittings, pipes
Fuel Lines, fuel caps, carbs
C - Chassis
Frame Condition Cracks at gussets, accessory mounts, look for paint lifting
Steering-head bearing No detent or tight spots through full travel, raise front wheel, check for play by pulling/pushing forks
Swingarm bushings / bearings Raise rear wheel, check for play by pulling/pushing swingarm
Suspension Forks Smooth travel, equal air pressure/damping anti-drive settings F R
Shock(s) Smooth travel, equal pre-load/air pressure/damping settings, linkage moves freely and is lubricated F R
Chain or belt Tension Check at tightest point
Lubrication Side plates when hot-DO NOT lubricate belts
Sprockets Teeth not hooked, securely mounted
Fasteners Threaded Tight, missing bolts, nuts
Clips Broken, missing
Cotter pins Broken, missing
K - Kickstand
Center-stand Condition Cracks, bent
Retention Springs in place, tension to hold position
Side-stand Condition Cracks, bent, (safety cut-out switch or pad if equipped)
Retention Springs in place, tension to hold position
 
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FearNoSpeed

Active member
Re: T-clock

I checked my clutch cable Friday.........:rolleyes:
Right after it broke....:mad:
Atleast I was on my way back from my ride, 3 blocks from home....;)
:D
I thought cables lasted forever.....:confused1:
 

pgagy

Active member
Re: T-clock

With a list like that, you won't have any time left this summer for actual riding.
Hah, I feel the same way. I wouldn't do that for a pre-ride inspection, but perhaps once every month do a thorough one like that. But when I ride to/from work every day and get on the bike 6-10 times in a day, I don't check anything. When I wash it I check things out, since I'm bent over already, otherwise not really.
 

leedufour

Well-known member
Site Supporter
Re: T-clock

Hah, I feel the same way. I wouldn't do that for a pre-ride inspection, but perhaps once every month do a thorough one like that. But when I ride to/from work every day and get on the bike 6-10 times in a day, I don't check anything. When I wash it I check things out, since I'm bent over already, otherwise not really.
Riding the bike everyday takes some of the inspection process out.
You'll know when things are on the way out.
If the bike is only ridden once a week or less then you might want to look at or test a few things before ripping away!
 

TheGradyTrain

Well-known member
Moderator
Site Supporter
Re: T-clock

Thanks Ric for the post. It should help some of the new riders on the board. Even refresh some of the regulars.
 

Worldtraveller

Active member
I admit I don't do this every time I ride. I do it about weekly, and right now I'm riding 2-3 times a week as the weather improves.
For you sportbike owners (I have a CBR), it's worth the investment for a rear wheel stand, just to not have to try and balance the bke while you check the oil. :p
My wife is very helpful for those kinda of things, but she's not always around to help.
Good list, for those of you who haven't taken the MSF basic rider course, that's where this comes from. I highly recommend it, and would suggest ordering the book for reference (if you can), or printing out some of these tips.
Cheers.
 

Wingboy

Well-known member
Moderator
Site Supporter
I admit I don't do this every time I ride. I do it about weekly, and right now I'm riding 2-3 times a week as the weather improves.
For you sportbike owners (I have a CBR), it's worth the investment for a rear wheel stand, just to not have to try and balance the bike while you check the oil. :p
My wife is very helpful for those kinda of things, but she's not always around to help.
Good list, for those of you who haven't taken the MSF basic rider course, that's where this comes from. I highly recommend it, and would suggest ordering the book for reference (if you can), or printing out some of these tips.
Cheers.
I still remember this from my Canada Safety Council course back in 73,no 75,ummm,i don't remember! It becomes a habit.And i find myself looking at other bikes tires at the beginning of a small group ride.
 

Pocket Sprocket

Well-known member
Site Supporter
Great post! The one I remember is FINE-CC
Fuel
Ignition
Neutral
Engine emergency off switch (we don't say 'kill' switch around motorcycles)
Choke
Clutch

very simple list to go through before take off, not as rigorous as yours but hopefully helpful for some.
 

hammer886

Member
A little diligence at the start will save you a lot of grief afterwards. Better to know your bike inside and out, then to find out that there is something wrong while riding. Always be safe! :D
 

ekzeL

Well-known member
Great post! The one I remember is FINE-CC
Fuel
Ignition
Neutral
Engine emergency off switch (we don't say 'kill' switch around motorcycles)
Choke
Clutch

very simple list to go through before take off, not as rigorous as yours but hopefully helpful for some.
RTI uses the KNIFE & CCT systems

Kickstand
Neutral
Ignition
Fuel
Engine

Choke
Clutch
Throttle
 

Baggsy

Well-known member
Site Supporter
Don't forget to check your turnsignals, running and brake lights every once in a while.
I've had my bike come back from a shop with the front brake trigger wire disconnected before.
 

Araqiels

Well-known member
PRE-PRE INSPECTION:

[ ] Keys.
[ ] Helmet and gear.
[ ] Wallet and slips.
[ ] Bear Spray.
[ ] Balaclava.
[ ] Pieces of paper with phone number pre-printed on them.
[ ] Cigarettes and lighter.
[ ] Rolling papers tucked in sock.
[ ] Organ donor card.
[ ] Gladius.

SAFETY INSPECTION:
[ ] Is the bike still there?
[ ] Is it still in one piece?
[ ] Does the bike start?
[ ] Does a rudimentary visual convince you the bike will arrive at it's destination?

POST INSPECTION:

[ ] Ride bike.
[ ] Rest one hand on hip / appear unrushed.
[ ] Make eye contact with strangers at red lights.
[ ] ???? PROFIT.
 

nobbie48

Well-known member
Site Supporter
Sorry but I disagree with most of the list. Most of what is listed would be found on a POST RIDE inspection. Then the correct actions could economically and more easily be taken care of before the next ride.

The problem with preride checks is that they come at the last minute and if something is amiss there is a temptation to let minor things go or they have to be fixed at rape prices. Or you mess up the ride.
 

Rishabh

Member
thanks! i'm a new rider. i remembered the knife acronym. but all this stuff is pretty decent and for new riders, if we do this a early on, it'll become a good habit as time goes by. i guess i will use this list as a couple of you mentioned as a weekend check list to go over the entire bike when i'm cleaning it up. cheers! :)
 

Qualdoth

Well-known member
Sorry but I disagree with most of the list. Most of what is listed would be found on a POST RIDE inspection. Then the correct actions could economically and more easily be taken care of before the next ride.

The problem with preride checks is that they come at the last minute and if something is amiss there is a temptation to let minor things go or they have to be fixed at rape prices. Or you mess up the ride.
Anybody that has left their bike unattended somewhere and has had it messed with would wholeheartedly disagree with you. You can certainly do post-ride inspections, and you're right in that you have more time to take care of them. However, that doesn't mean you shouldn't at least do a circle check/walk around PRE-ride.

At minimum a pre-ride check would consist of:
- quick visual inspection of the totality of the bike (has it been moved, evidence of tipovers, and the like)
- visual inspection of tires to look for punctures
- checking of all controls (levers, pedals, throttle)
- chain tension
 
I ALWAYS do a quick walk around looking for leaks AND I give each tire a hard kick before I get on the bike EVERY TIME. The kick tells of a tire deflating. You get to know the exact feel/sound of "normal" after you've done it a thousand times or so.
 

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