Step by Step guide from getting your licence to buying your bike | Page 2 | GTAMotorcycle.com

Step by Step guide from getting your licence to buying your bike

DESTROYER

New member
Thank-you getfunky! I have used your post from well before I even considered getting my M1. Just got it this morning and am taking the course next week. Now which bike? I know I know, I have to post on another thread but.... I was 90% decided on learning on a 250 Ninja and so many are telling me I will get bored in 2 weeks. What is your experience with yours? Thanks in advance?
 

getfunky

Member
Thank-you getfunky! I have used your post from well before I even considered getting my M1. Just got it this morning and am taking the course next week. Now which bike? I know I know, I have to post on another thread but.... I was 90% decided on learning on a 250 Ninja and so many are telling me I will get bored in 2 weeks. What is your experience with yours? Thanks in advance?
Congrats on M1. Good luck on the M2. As for my 250, i'm pretty happy with it. When I first got it I was lil nervous on it and glad I didnt go more powerful and pop wheelies by mistake. Its forgiving and builds your confidence. After a month of riding and becoming one with the bike I felt the urge to upgrade to 600 seeing all the other 600's on the road. But glad I didn't because the moment my bike hit the 5000k mark it became so much more responsive and felt more power kicking out of it and not to mention I enjoy paying cheap insurance on the 250. Its a breeze on the city and highway. So i'm sticking with it till next riding season where I "may" upgrade to a 600. You can easily do speeds of 140-160 on this and thats really more than enough.

So start on the 250 and if you want to upgrade, there will always be someone dying to buy the bike. It is the most desired bike for newcomers to riding. So nothing to lose my friend :)
 

ktbike

New member
This is great! very good information.


So you are deciding to get a bike? Well this guide should hopefully answer all your questions.

Step 1: Get an insurance quote.

Before doing anything, the first thing you need to do is get a quote and see if you can actually afford the payments. Many hopeful riders had their dreams dashed because insurance was more than they can afford. There are some amazing links on this site that will help you with that.

Which insurance company? -> http://www.gtamotorcycle.com/vbforum/showthread.php?t=111466

VifferFun went through a lot of trouble to put this together so my all means read it carefully. Almost everything you need to know is on the first page itself. If you get a good quote, try to get them to mail it to you as they usually good for 45 days. Call 3-4 different companies. Don't be afraid to shop around and get the best rate.

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Step 2: Do the M1

This is simple and it costs $17.50. I used this to pass the M1 portion of the test-> http://www.scribd.com/doc/15007911/Ontario-Motorcycle-Handbook-M1-M2

Note that the above handbook is not enough to pass as you need knowledge of G1 questions and road signs. You maybe asking “What does G1 have to do with this?”. My answer “Nothing. Just the MTO is lazy to eliminate those questions”. Even if you have your G1, you still need to do this. The questions you really need to know are the ones pertaining to suspensions and demerit points.

I haven’t found an online handbook but here is a practice site -> http://www.g1test.com/
Here is one that has both M1 and G1 if you don't mind paying -> http://www.passthewheel.com/

Once you’re ready, go to any of the centre that offer the written test -> https://www.services.gov.on.ca/services/serviceDetails.do?action=specify_city&channel=COUNTER&id=137&locale=EN

Just type in your postal code and you’ll find the closest location. Word of advice – Go the moment it opens in the morning otherwise be prepared to wait 2-3 hrs at any other time of the day.

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Step 3: Do the M2 training course

There are benefits to doing the training course as opposed to going straight-away for the test. You’ll get insurance discounts and you will learn proper technique and useful information. Plus it will give you an idea whether riding is for you or not. Better to spend the $350-$450 and figure its not for you than spend $2000+ and lose on the resale. There are a bunch that offer these courses:

a) Learning Curves - http://www.gtamotorcycle.com/vbforum/showthread.php?t=114918
These folks are awesome. I did mine here and learned a lot. Waiting period shouldn’t be too long here. You could get one the week off if you’re lucky.

b) Rider Training Institute - http://www.ridertraining.ca/
These folks are popular so getting a date anytime soon is unlikey unless someone cancelled. You are looking at a month to two months waiting period.

c) Centennial College - http://db2.centennialcollege.ca/ce/coursedetail.php?CourseCode=CEMO-801
More expensive than the others but since this is a college and counts as a part-time course you get tax benefits at the time of filing. You can check their availability online.

d) Humber College - http://www.humber.ca/motorcycle/
Same as the above but I’m not sure about the price.

There are others but I don’t remember them. The key thing here is pick the one closest to you. They are all good and recommended. The reason you should pick the closest one to you is because these are intense training days (Sat and Sun from 8-9 till 4-5 depending on the institute). You will be exhausted and tired by the end of the session so it pays to have a shorter commute home. Also don’t buy equipment now. As long as you wear jeans, any kind of leather jacket, gloves that cover the wrists (gardening gloves will do if worst comes to worst) and boots that cover ankles. If you can borrow or rent the Dot approved helmet (Parker Brothers http://www.powersports.ca/) that would be useful. Unless you already happen to have a bike and gear to go with it, then just bring that.

Remember: Passing this course doesn't automatically change your licence to M2. You have to wait minimum 60 days from the time you do your M1 (not from time you do M2) before you can go to the MTO and hand in the sealed envelope to get your M2. So till then, M1 restrictions apply.

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Step 4: What kind of bike and the hunt for said bike

Once you pass, begin the search for your bike. If you are new, I highly recommend a used 250 or 500 to begin with if you are going the sportbike route. I say used because it will be cheaper for one, and you will drop it so better to buy used and learn on it for a year or so before upgrading to something bigger and powerful. Also you don't have to worry about the hassle's of breaking-in a brand new bike. You can also put a lower amount than you paid in the Bill of Sale section of the UVIP to pay lower taxes and save some money ;-)

I prefer 250 to hone your skills before moving up and there are a bunch of good ones. The most popular being the Kawasaki Ninja 250r. The other two choices are Honda's CBR 250 and Hyosung GT250R. Here is a good shootout video and article of the three -> link. If you are too lazy to research the differences, allow me to break it down:

Ninja 250r: Most popular bike out there and easy to re-sell with minimum to no loss. Its a two cylinder, 4 stroke, liquid cooled engine. Its has the most power of the three but for some weird reason is not fuel injected. The europeans get F.I. bikes, why don't we? :( So that means you've to play with the choke to get it started and its a hassle especially during cold days where you've to warm up the engine for a good 5 minutes or more. This bike is slightly wider and heavier than the honda by 20lbs. This is good for taller ppl like myself (6 feet, 185lbs).

Honda CBR250r: The new competition for the ninja and it a strong competitor. Though its slightly slower than the ninja with single cylinder, 4 stroke, liquid cooled engine; its got an edge by being fuel injected. What that means is no worry's for cold starts or warming up the bike for a while before heading out. This right here would one big reason many people opt for the Honda over the Ninja. Also this come equipped with optional ABS which the ninja doesn't offer. Being single cylinder, its narrower and lower to the ground ideal for medium to short height people. Also this has the most torque of the three but also the least power of the three.

Hyosung GT250: Its a two cylinder, 4 stroke, air cooled bike. I've heard lot of problems with air cooled bikes and I usual tend to stay away from them especially if you have a lot of stop and go traffic. I've also heard the ride and fit/finish is a little below par. Hard to recommend this bike, plus the resale is hard. Power and torque puts this in the middle of the other two bikes.

If you want something more faster then your choices are -> The new Ninja 400r, the discontinued Ninja 500 and the existing Suzuki GS500F. These will be a few thousand more than the 250s but it comes with more power. All these ikes don’t stay on the used market for long esp the 250s. So make sure you have your finances and everything ready incase you find a good one. There is the Honda CBR125cc and that is perfect city bike. If you plan to do a lot of highway, I wouldn’t recommend it. A 250cc+ would be the way to go then. If you are thinking 600cc+, please read this first -> http://www.gtamotorcycle.com/vbforum/showthread.php?t=42129


I’m not sure if the same applies to cruisers. Maybe something that’s 400cc-650cc for a cruiser would be good to start but don’t quote me on this as I’m just guessing.

Good places to search are:
a) The sale section of this forum -> http://www.gtamotorcycle.com/vbforum/forumdisplay.php?f=13
b) Craigslist -> http://toronto.en.craigslist.ca/
c) Kijiji ->http://toronto.kijiji.ca/
d) Autotrader -> http://www.autotrader.ca/motorcycles_atvs
e) The marketplace on Facebook

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Step 5: Buying the bike

Lets say you found a used bike you really like. Meet the seller, inspect the bike. If you can bring a friend that is knowledgeable that would help. Otherwise look for signs it was raced or dropped. If he/she lets you test it, then by all means do so. Otherwise get them to ride around in front of you.


(Courtesy of thestar.com)
  • Make sure it's really clean. If the owner couldn't be bothered to get the bike looking perfect before you got there, walk away. Chances are maintenance was treated the same.
  • Do a quick walk-around, looking for obvious crash damage like bent levers, damaged paint, marks on the bottom outside edges of the engine cases, or scratched handlebar ends. Get the bars straight and look at it from front and rear for any sign of wheel misalignment.
  • Check for little holes ( 1/16th of an inch) drilled in fasteners and fluid drain bolts. It's a dead giveaway that the bike has been raced or at least used hard on track days.
  • Check the rubber with the flashlight. Inspect the manifolds between the carb (or EFI system) and the engine in particular. Any age cracks there could mean endless grief over a performance problem.
  • Check tire tread depth, profile (if the rear in particular looks a bit "squared off" rather than round, it's overdue for replacement), and sidewall cracks.
  • Check the brakes and clutch levers for smooth operation and push the bike around. Do the brakes work? Does the clutch release?
  • Check the lights and signals.
  • Before you start the motor, put a hand on it to be sure it's cold – sellers have been known to get a poor-starting engine hot before a buyer arrives to make it more likely to fire quickly when tried.
  • Check suspension for leaks (oil residue on the fork legs or near the shocks), and push down both ends to be sure the compression and rebound are smooth. Get the front wheel off the ground and turn the bars from lock to lock; clicking noises or looseness are bad signs.
For a more detailed guide, you can read this -> http://www.gtamotorcycle.com/vbforum/showthread.php?t=1237
If the bike is a year or two old, there really shouldn’t be much problems. Once you are confident on the bike you choose, a used motorcycle from a private sale requires the following: (if you go the dealership route, they take care of the following and guide you on what to do)

*Note:* Step a and b are if you only want it registered in your name. Step c and d are if you want to plate the bike.

a) Used Vehicle Information Package, which the seller should provide.
b) Ownership papers that you and the seller will fill out
c) You'll also need a safety certificate – I'd hold out for one from a reputable bike shop. In Ontario, any licensed car mechanic can certify a motorcycle, whether he knows what he's looking at or not. A highly recommended one across this board is Ted from Rosey Toes (http://dontai.com/oldsite/roseytoes/). You can take it to his shop and get is certified for around $40 or he can come to the sellers places and get it certified for $80. Sometimes the seller will pay for it, something you may have to. I prefer to get someone I trust certify for it and pay for it myself than have the seller certify it from some car mechanic.
d) Insurance coverage. You will get the VIN from the UVIP or ownership papers that the insurance company will need to begin your coverage. You will get a policy number that you need to fill into the ownership paper section.

Before concluding the private sale, make sure you collect the motorcycle manual, spare keys etc from the seller to avoid any future hassle. Ask if the seller can deliver the bike to your place since you have no plates yet. If he cannot you can haul it using a large van or have someone else do it for you. There are a couple of guys that do this on this board, like ToyHauler. Or you can pay a deposit, fill out a contract to protect your self (http://www.billofsaleforms.info/), get your licence plate (next step), return to seller and swap plates on the bike and return his plate, pay the remaining and drive off and enjoy!

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Step 6: Getting your licence plate and Gear

Take the above three things (UVIP, Safety certificate and ownership papers) and go to any of the centers here -> (input your postal code and search) https://www.services.gov.on.ca/services/serviceDetails.do?action=specify_city&channel=COUNTER&id=100&locale=EN

Pay the fees and you’ll have a plate. Put it on your bike and enjoy. As for gear, Royal Distribution (http://www.royaldistributing.com/main/) down in Guelph has good prices otherwise keep an eye out for local gear with good padding and protection over style. There is also Dave at Altimate boots at Keele and Lawrence. He'll hook you up with all the gear you'll need at warehouse prices. He supplies Royal. and most of the dealers in town.

Jacket: There are many choices from, leather to textile to mesh to combination. I personally prefer the combinations. Half leather half textile with lining serves all purposes. Leather on the parts that matter like elbows, shoulders, back and chest while the rest is textile with more room to breathe. I've seen mostly ICON do this as well as Joe Rocket. I picked up a Joe Rocket one from Cycleworld Superstore (www.cycleworldsuperstore.com). It has removable sleeves but keeps a lining a mesh underneath with amour so you're still protected on those extremely hot days. It also comes with a loops that your belt can go through to prevent it from sliding up when you fall. For something like that you're looking in the $350 range

Helmet: Many choices - some come modular that can have the entire front piece lift if you do a lot of talking, others with separate built-in sun visors, some with pumps to keep the padding snug, ventilation etc. I say - go with something that has ventilation and the others stuff is upto you. Make sure it is snug and doesn't allow your face to go side to side when your hold the helmet tight. Something good will cost you $300 and up.

Gloves: I recommend getting two pairs. One for winter and a summer use. As long as there is knuckle and wrist bone protection you are good. Good pairs cost around $80 up.

Pants: I didn't get any. If you plan to race get leather otherwise for street get textile. Or if you are like me and prefer wearing jeans, you can get some knee pads to slide under your jeans.

Boots: I got a pair of ICON Tarmac Ventilated shoes and OH MY that is sooooo comfy and nice. I absolutely love it and has great ankle protection. Also it isn't like a racing boot that comes up so high. Price is cheap too! Around $100 and up.

Hope this guide was helpful. If I missed any section let me know and I’ll add it.
 

zdestiny

New member
Regarding the Step 2 in the original post - it mentions that the M1 costs 17.50. On the DriveTest website, it says 57.50, however this includes the $40 for the M2 Road Test.

My question - If I plan to take a riding course, is the price of the test included in the course? If so, can I just pay the 17.50 to get the M1 permit, and then not worry about the 40 for the road test?
 

getfunky

Member
Regarding the Step 2 in the original post - it mentions that the M1 costs 17.50. On the DriveTest website, it says 57.50, however this includes the $40 for the M2 Road Test.

My question - If I plan to take a riding course, is the price of the test included in the course? If so, can I just pay the 17.50 to get the M1 permit, and then not worry about the 40 for the road test?
17.50 is if you only doing the written test and taking the road test with the riding course. The riding course includes the road test and usually have free re-test if you fail (which rarely happens-the failing part that is)
 

Hammer

Well-known member
After we pay the HST on the purchase price...

how much is it for the plate?

how much is it for the sticker?
 

skapan

Well-known member
Pricing is similar to cars. Dealers have a "blue book" that lists wholesale pricing, but your best resource is the Craigslist, Kijiji and Autotrader websites. Look at prices, see how long the bike has been listed, and use the "value finder" on Autotrader. Remember, it's only worth what you're willing to pay. If a deal feels wrong, move on.
 


Pants: I didn't get any. If you plan to race get leather otherwise for street get textile. Or if you are like me and prefer wearing jeans, you can get some knee pads to slide under your jeans.

Boots: I got a pair of ICON Tarmac Ventilated shoes and OH MY that is sooooo comfy and nice. I absolutely love it and has great ankle protection. Also it isn't like a racing boot that comes up so high. Price is cheap too! Around $100 and up.

Hope this guide was helpful. If I missed any section let me know and I’ll add it.
hi
Great post.
Can I just make a couple of suggestions?

1) Back protector. As important as any other of your safety kit. A broken back is not fun.
2) You said you wear jeans when you ride, which is fine, however I would want to point out that jeans offer little to no protection in a slide. Look up kevlar reinforced jeans (Draggin' Jeans or similar) - if you have to wear jeans I would recommend these.

Thanks again for a great post
 

SeaBreez

Well-known member
Great thread...

My 2 cents...

In step 4, you say... "You will drop it"

It may be more accurate to state... "There is a possibility you may drop your first bike"?? "Buying used may be a better choice for your first bike.?"

" I say used because it will be cheaper for one, and you will drop it so better to buy used and learn on it for a year or so before upgrading to something bigger and powerful. .
 

Jovani

New member
Hi, I'm one of those inexperienced newbies that knows nothing they're talking about! I've sat on a Ninja 250 and gosh did it feel cramped. At just over 6'3 with a 34/35 inseam, I felt like I needed something bigger but not too much more powerful.

The article you posted mentions the Suzuki 500, but I find that bike to be rather outdated compared to the competition; what's everyones thought on the Ninja 400r?

Thanks!
 

Snorlex

Member
Hi, I just want to know, does all of the training courses you mentioned includes the road test? So I just pay $17.50 for M1 and $350-$450 on the course + test?

And another question is, don't they provide you the gears in the course? I'm planning on getting a bike after I get the full M.
 

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