something for us RD350 fans... | GTAMotorcycle.com

something for us RD350 fans...

Morrissey

Well-known member
I think it's a great idea. The bike scene in North America is very top heavy with high displacement, high dollar bikes. More options in the entry level, beginner, budget-friendly end are welcome in my books! While I'm not likely to be buying a 300cc bike anytime soon (but who knows, I do have a Sachs MadAss after all!), I'm sure that more than a few new riders over the past 10yrs have looked at their sub-500cc options and been very underwhelmed, especially if they don't want a full faring sport-styled bike. Now that Kawi has a Versys 300, Honda has the new Rebel 500/300, and Suzuki may bring us the Vstrom 300, this would fit nicely in the mix.
 

nakkers

Well-known member
Site Supporter
It's all about the sound track. With the two stroke ring and power band, those machines were awesome.

A parallel twin? Even with a can, doesn't make for sweet music.

An in-line 4 would be cost prohibitive.

I think the more small displacement offerings the better. And I would pick one up assuming they sold a huge number and the used market had plenty available cheap.




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inreb

Well-known member
Site Supporter
It's all about the sound track. With the two stroke ring and power band, those machines were awesome.

A parallel twin? Even with a can, doesn't make for sweet music.

An in-line 4 would be cost prohibitive.

I think the more small displacement offerings the better. And I would pick one up assuming they sold a huge number and the used market had plenty available cheap.

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P2 can sound good with an offset crank like the latest 270's or Husky Nuda 315. I have never really liked the 180 and 360 P2 sound.
 

Flywheel

Well-known member
And I would pick one up assuming they sold a huge number and the used market had plenty available cheap.
I get what you're saying, but that's not exactly a vote of confidence for the product. Not digging the whole Modern-Retro thing that manufacturers are banking on these days. Like the new Rebel, it just comes across as awkward IMO.
 

inreb

Well-known member
Site Supporter
I get what you're saying, but that's not exactly a vote of confidence for the product. Not digging the whole Modern-Retro thing that manufacturers are banking on these days. Like the new Rebel, it just comes across as awkward IMO.
The whole modern retro thing is kind of bogus save for two aspects imho. These bikes look to be much simpler to work on. I can have my Triumph down to the frame in very short order. I get a headache at the mere thought of digging into plastic covered CAD generated bikes. The other appeal is the low level of performance. I like just enough and any mid to large retro is more than just enough.
 

MacDoc

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42 HP 370 lb.

59 HP 328 lb

Now that may reflect the difference in HP calculations but the R3 is clearly geared for the learner market.

KTM is 43 hp as well but 306 dry weight.


In reality the RD350 was about 42 HP ....same as above.
It humiliated the bikes of its time

From the first '73 RD350 to the last 1975 RD350B, Yamaha's overachieving pocket rocket humiliated triples and fours packing over twice its 347ccs on racetracks and backroads all over the planet.

Back when bell-bottoms were cool and Harley's weren't, most anybody's big-bore multi roasted the RD in a straight line. Horsepower was cheap, and any fool could twist a throttle.
But motorcycle handling was still an oxymoron in Japan...except at Yamaha.

When seventh-morning services convened at the shrine of the divine apex, street or track, all bowed to the RD. For the proletarian canyon commando, laying down $3000-plus for one of 50 1974 750SS Ducatis was like Led Zeppelin playing the next freshman/sophomore mixer: very bitchin', and highly unlikely. Kawasaki's very fast, very large Z-1 wore a $1995 price tag. But a 1974 RD350 sold for $908: Moet Chandon on a Schlitz budget. Racetrack handling for the masses.
 
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nakkers

Well-known member
Site Supporter
P2 can sound good with an offset crank like the latest 270's or Husky Nuda 315. I have never really liked the 180 and 360 P2 sound.
I do like the Bonnie/Thruxton bark with arrows pipes.


Might look for a cheapie 250/300 to bash around this summer. Maybe even a GS500.




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ReSTored

Well-known member
A friend had a RD350 and I rode it a few times. It was a rocketship compared to most bikes on the road at that time.

Relatively small displacement bikes were the norm in the sixties and seventies and I never gave a thought or had any concerns riding my little CB175 hundreds of miles on weekends. My XS750, with mag wheels, shaft drive, triple disks and a colour matched Windjammer fairing was a great touring bike for the late seventies, but now a 750 is considered too small by most to tour anywhere.
 

Morrissey

Well-known member
only by those running 1+Ks that have to haul a lot of load.
I rode my 600 Bandit through the states and to the Cabot Trail and back fully loaded with 3 Givi cases and had no want for more power or a bigger bike. Maybe if I had been two up as well, but even with an average sized passenger it would have been plenty of bike.
 

Flywheel

Well-known member
The whole modern retro thing is kind of bogus save for two aspects imho. These bikes look to be much simpler to work on. I can have my Triumph down to the frame in very short order. I get a headache at the mere thought of digging into plastic covered CAD generated bikes.
Don't remind me, I have to strip down the Burg to do all sorts of maintenance this winter. A regular jigsaw of sagging plastic ready to snap mounting tabs while you remove 6+ different types of fastener. Can't we all just agree to stick with Allen screws for everything?

That old school RD is just plain cool, regardless of the decade. That MT photo looks more like the box top of a Lego kit. Sigh, I'm getting creaky.
 
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inreb

Well-known member
Site Supporter
I'm not agreeing to anything until further review. Would you agree to Dr. Suess fasteners across the board?
 

Riceburner

Well-known member
I rode my 600 Bandit through the states and to the Cabot Trail and back fully loaded with 3 Givi cases and had no want for more power or a bigger bike. Maybe if I had been two up as well, but even with an average sized passenger it would have been plenty of bike.
I don't think I'd ever do 2up touring. But I hear ya, went cross-continent and cross country a lot on 750 or less.
 

Flywheel

Well-known member
"I'm not agreeing to anything until further review. Would you agree to Dr. Suess fasteners across the board?"--inreb

Squiggly drivers are neat, squarish sockets a treat. Problem is, a Mastercraft combo-kit in SAE/Seuss would sting the old wallet. What's wrong with wingnuts? Do them in metric, fake a video of Sochiro Honda assembling a motor-bicycle and BAM! The anti-tool movement begins:

"FINGERS" (cue guitar riff)

"MORE STANDARD THAN A SWISS ARMY KNIFE" (more riffing)
 

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