Rolling Chassis In Apartment | Page 2 | GTAMotorcycle.com

Rolling Chassis In Apartment

bitzz

Well-known member
I'm going to make a prediction.

This is not going to end well for OP.
HE IS STORING A MOTOR VEHICLE IN A RENTED APARTMENT.
You people don't see a problem with that?
I bet you a rental tribunal will have a problem with that, and side with the landlord.


I am the guy with 11 motorcycles in the front room of my house.
 

bitzz

Well-known member
op: Check your lease again.
Isn't there a clause that requires all tenant vehicles on the premises to be plated and insured? It is a standard clause.
 

GreyGhost

Well-known member
Site Supporter
op: Check your lease again.
Isn't there a clause that requires all tenant vehicles on the premises to be plated and insured? It is a standard clause.
Interesting point. I wonder what the legal definition of a motor vehicle is? The argument that it has no motor installed seems like a reasonable counterargument.
 

Joe Bass

*probably eating right now*
Site Supporter
I cannot give you advice for or against.
I see both sides to the argument (other LL issues notwithstanding)
I will agree with taking all the pictures.
I would recommend, however NOT to share them with the LL at this time.
Afaik from what I've read, she has never seen the chassis in the apt, and only in your emails have you mentioned it. Sending pics before you need to, may inadvertently help her case.
Fyi this is merely mho. I have no legal training, and did not stay at a Holiday Inn Express last night.

Sent from my Purple LGG4 using Tapatalk
 

Evoex

The God
Site Supporter
If you like the price and location, you should respect the owner and stop using your apartment as a garage.
That's certainly not the issue here.

Let the landlord prove it cannot take the weight and it's a hazard to the structure, OK fine.

Short of that, piss off. He's not breaking the law or his lease agreement.
 

meme

Well-known member
Site Supporter
I'm thinking it's her place, so her rules. Plus the insurance on the building, policy would probably be void IF something was to happen.

Or you can spend a **** ton of money fighting for cheap(er) rent.
 

K20EF8

Well-known member
I'm thinking it's her place, so her rules.
It doesnt work like that. You cant make up your own set of rules, not here anyway.
A "No Muslim" or "No tattoo" or "No purple hair" rule will land you in some deep ****, as in human rights tribunal.
 

K20EF8

Well-known member
op: Check your lease again.
Isn't there a clause that requires all tenant vehicles on the premises to be plated and insured? It is a standard clause.
What constitutes a vehicle though? A frame on wheels?
Is a coffee table made from an engine and transmission considered a vehicle?
 

bitzz

Well-known member
Well
Let's start with a VIN. Does it have a VEHICLE identification number?
Would a reasonable person call two wheels attached to a motorcycle frame, with a VEHICLE identification number... and a motor sitting a piece of plywood beside it, a vehicle?
Not much of a stretch.

... you don't have a coffee table. You have a motorcycle, and a gas can, in a rented apartment.
 

Rockwell

Well-known member
The story started off as a rolling chassis, then it turns out there was a gas can there (now removed) and the engine is also sitting there on a separate piece of wood.

Should've sweet-talked the landlady before bringing the bike in.

If you like the price and location, you should respect the owner and stop using your apartment as a garage.
My engine has been sitting here for a while. The rolling chassis was brought in when I had to remove it from my mother's garage due to her selling their home. The engine is sitting separately. I don't think this changes the situation at all. I had several things dropped off, including boxes of things that had been stored at my mother's house and a Jerry can that I didn't realize had fuel in it. This was immediately removed from the apartment. I have told my landlord this on several occasions.

Please tell me how I am disrespecting the owner if I am acting within my rights? I am not doing any damage and these parts pose no danger. If I invite my heavy-set friends over to my place, who, collectively, weigh more than my entire motorcycle would if all the parts were assembled, am I also disrespecting my landlord? Should I comply if she arbitrarily and unreasonably asks me not to invite them in because of their weight, which has been her only objection to my motorcycle parts? I know having these parts in my place doesn't "feel" right, but I'm trying to actually think about it, and I cannot see anything wrong with it. These are not causing any damage, they pose no danger, and I am not treating my apartment like a garage (the bike is not operational, I am not driving it in and out, there are no exhaust fumes, no oil, gas or any combustibles whatsoever). If I am wrong and there is a rational basis beyond the mere optics of the situation, please let me know. If I am acting within my rights, not causing any damage and posing no danger, how am I disrespecting her? Or, is she disrespecting me by attempting to violate my rights by trying to impose upon what I reasonable can and cannot bring into the space that I pay (a lot) for.

I am actually a really good tenant. When I moved in, I repaired all the holes in the drywall from the nails and screws from the previous tenants. I spent over $500 of my own money on paint and supplies and spend a ton of time painting the entire apartment, which really is the responsibility of my landlord and would have costed her thousands of dollars in labour. I always pay my rent on time and I do most of my own repairs and maintenance since it's easier for me to do so than contact my landlord and wait for her to send someone by, which, according to the other tenants, can literally take years (the 75 year-old woman has been waiting for three years for the landlord to fix the hole in her ceiling from a previous leaking toilet in the apartment above hers, and the tenants above me have been waiting for over a year to have a leaking roof repaired). I take care of my apartment because I have to live here.

Of course, I'd prefer to have these parts somewhere else, and not sitting in my dining space, but I really have no place to put them. On top of these absurd rents, I can not currently afford to pay for garage space or a storage locker. I also suggested that I'd move the chassis outside onto my back deck, but she freaked out saying that the deck was not built to support the weight, even though she had no idea about the load-bearing capabilities of the deck or the weight of the chassis. The chassis is under 300 lbs., and of course the deck can easily support that weight. She's just not rational.

It's not that I like the rent, it's simply that rents have continued to skyrocket since I moved in a year and a half ago. And, I think, that's part of the problem. My landlord is limited to rent increases of 1.8% per year (going to 2.2% next year) for current tenants, but, if her existing tenants move out, she can raise rents way beyond that based on current market prices. Market prices have been increasing far beyond what landlords are limited to raise rents with existing tenants. There simply is no incentive to keep current tenants. For example, the old woman who lives next to me has lived here for 36 years. It's her home. Everyone in the neighborhood knows her, and she takes care of all the neighborhood stray cats. She has expressed to me on several occasions her concern that the landlord keeps raising her rent. The landlord pays this 75 year-old woman $50 to shovel snow and ice on the long walkway around our apartment during the winter ($50 for the entire winter!). This old lady is on a fixed income and really needs the money, but she should not have to be shoveling snow and ice, especially at her age. But all she really asks of the landlord is that she not raise her rent because she will soon not be able to afford it. If she is forced out, she really will not have many options. Despite that, the landlord has lied to her and told her that the bank said that she has to keep raising her rent. If the landlord forces this old lady out from her home of 36 years, she can easily double the rental income from this unit. I have assured the old lady that she doesn't need to worry about losing her home. If she ever cannot afford to pay the rent, I told her that I will find a way to come up with the money to help her out. I have also offered to give her the $50 so that she doesn't have to shovel snow and ice in the winter.
 
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Rockwell

Well-known member
Well
Let's start with a VIN. Does it have a VEHICLE identification number?
Would a reasonable person call two wheels attached to a motorcycle frame, with a VEHICLE identification number... and a motor sitting a piece of plywood beside it, a vehicle?
Not much of a stretch.

... you don't have a coffee table. You have a motorcycle, and a gas can, in a rented apartment.
My frame is stamped with the VIN. I was in an accident in 2011, and the frame was cracked at the steering column. I ordered a new frame, and the VIN was stamped into it. If I had this frame ordered to my apartment, could I bring it in? Is it a vehicle because it has a VIN, and maybe sitting next to other motorcycle parts? Regardless, I think this is irrelevant. What's relevant is whether or not these parts pose a danger and/or are causing any damage. Regarding the gas can, you seem to have misunderstood or missed the part where I explained that the sealed jerry can was immediately removed. I didn't realize there was fuel in it, and it did reasonably pose a risk, so I immediately complied.

Bombs can be made with common household items if mixed correctly and in the right quantities. If I have some of these items in separate containers, do I have a bomb in my apartment? Or do I need to mix all of the right items in the right quantities such that they pose some sort of reasonable danger? My motorcycle parts will not spontaneously become assembled, and the tanks be filled with oil and gas.

You seem to be saying that:
These parts, though not assembled and not functioning like a vehicle, can be perceived as a vehicle, and therefore, they should not be in an apartment.

Vehicles generally emit dangerous exhaust fumes, contain combustible oils and fuels, and therefore, should not be stored in an apartment BECAUSE of the danger they pose.

What you seem to be confused about is that, because you call something a vehicle, or you perceive something as being a vehicle, it should not be in an apartment. This completely ignores the reason why vehicles typically should not be stored in an apartment. The reason is not what it's called. It's not the name of the item. The consideration is whether or not the item, regardless of what it is called or perceived to be, poses a danger or is causing damage. The bike parts, or motorcycle, or vehicle, or whatever label you want to place on it, poses no danger and is causing no damage. If this is the case, please tell me why they cannot or should not be there.
 
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Rockwell

Well-known member
What's her name?
Maybe look up if she owns other properties and in a round about way, let her know that you have some time to go around to her other buildings to survey whether she is a good LL or a slumlord and open a can of worms?
I wouldn't post her name. I'm not sure if that's an ethical thing to do. I have been told that she owns other properties, and she certainly does seem to be a slum-lord, someone who wants to collect and raise rents, but not fulfill her responsibilities as a landlord. I feel that she's also a bit of a bully.
 

GateKeeper

Well-known member
Put all parts and bits, and anything to do with the bike, in box's, or wrap up in cardboard, so one cannot tell what is in there, and tell her it's stuff, none of her business what's in the box or packaging, could be stuff you just ordered online, or stuff you are getting ready to be shipped.

As they say, out of sight, out of mind.....perhaps if she don't see things related to a bike, then she won't have anything to complain about, it will be just a bunch of box's.

.
 

Evoex

The God
Site Supporter
Put all parts and bits, and anything to do with the bike, in box's, or wrap up in cardboard, so one cannot tell what is in there, and tell her it's stuff, none of her business what's in the box or packaging, could be stuff you just ordered online, or stuff you are getting ready to be shipped.

As they say, out of sight, out of mind.....perhaps if she don't see things related to a bike, then she won't have anything to complain about, it will be just a bunch of box's.

.
He is under no obligation to do any such thing. Landlord can complain all they want, the law is the law.
 

GateKeeper

Well-known member
He is under no obligation to do any such thing. Landlord can complain all they want, the law is the law.
Agreed, but to make it easier, and have the landlord stop her frivolous complaining, a couple of box's and some cardboard wrapped around the bike parts, could help in shutting her up

as far as I am concerned, I would tell her to STFU and ignore her ramblings, wait for the official papers to be presented, then take it to the next level

.
 

GreyGhost

Well-known member
Site Supporter
Agreed, but to make it easier, and have the landlord stop her frivolous complaining, a couple of box's and some cardboard wrapped around the bike parts, could help in shutting her up

as far as I am concerned, I would tell her to STFU and ignore her ramblings, wait for the official papers to be presented, then take it to the next level

.
A few rolls of wrapping paper and he has an early xmas present from his mom. He will open it in december to see what's in it.
 

Iceman

Well-known member
To each their own but vehicles don't belong in the house. If you own the house it's your call. If I'm a landlord I dont want people using my property as a garage.

Sent from my SM-A530W using Tapatalk
 

GreyGhost

Well-known member
Site Supporter
To each their own but vehicles don't belong in the house. If you own the house it's your call. If I'm a landlord I dont want people using my property as a garage.

Sent from my SM-A530W using Tapatalk
And this is why I will not be a residential landlord. I can see both sides of this mess and there are no good answers.

On the bike front, it's not illegal. The landlord can wish/hope/want whatever they want but they have rented the space for someone else to use. They need to stick to law/actual damages, not act like they can make up any rule they want.

On the rent increases, this is why controlled rent increases are a mess. As time passes, landlords have more and more incentive to get out old tenants as the rents get further and further from market rates. Yes, removing rent controls mean some people need to move to a cheaper area, but sadly that's life. Even if I wanted to buy a house downtown, I can't afford it and that's nobodies problem but mine.

On the other side, so many landlords have been f'd over by scumbag tenants it's unbelievable. Privacy laws protecting people that perpetually don't pay rent is crazy. A landlord should be able to file with LTB and if tenant is found to be a problem, they should be listed on a database for future landlords to search (to limit abuse, maybe $20 a name to search and you need to list the new property address?).

Based on all of the above, it's a miracle that every rental in Toronto hasn't been converted to AirBnB. You can make similar money but have no long-term problems. Legislation preventing that is well intentioned, but honestly, the fundamental problems with rental needs to be fixed, not just play whack-a-mole with alternative options for landlords.
 

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