Parallel Twins Take Over-Cycle World article | GTAMotorcycle.com

Parallel Twins Take Over-Cycle World article

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Snowmadic
Site Supporter
I disagree with the article somewhat.

Author is miffed that he's no longer being marketed to, but doesn't realize that he's part of a shrinking demographic that is aging out of motorcycles. Manufacturers can either keep trying to squeeze blood from a disappearing stone, or they can go find greener pastures, and this is exactly where the electric motorcycles are coming into play. I admit, it's a Hail Mary play, but from a risk/reward perspective, it offers greater returns than making a cheaper, faster Sportster but not calling it a Sportster and hoping the fogeys that are still buying motorcycles won't notice...
 
I disagree with the article somewhat.

Author is miffed that he's no longer being marketed to, but doesn't realize that he's part of a shrinking demographic that is aging out of motorcycles. Manufacturers can either keep trying to squeeze blood from a disappearing stone, or they can go find greener pastures, and this is exactly where the electric motorcycles are coming into play. I admit, it's a Hail Mary play, but from a risk/reward perspective, it offers greater returns than making a cheaper, faster Sportster but not calling it a Sportster and hoping the fogeys that are still buying motorcycles won't notice...
 

Roadghost

Well-known member
He acts as though manufacturers are giving up on the middle-aged market. They're not. There's lots of bikes for them and there will always be a middle aged market - it's not going anywhere. But there's nothing wrong with trying to expand your market, and newer battery technology is coming that will make electric bikes more affordable with longer range. HD is rumored to be dropping their electric motorcycles, but they're not successful because of the outrageous pricing. You can't just focus on one engine, or one design and expect to solve the sales problem. Companies have to be dynamic. They also have to realize that the youth market is price-sensitive, so where Royal Enfield's easily serviceable $5500 bikes are selling to them, the rest of the manufacturers shouldn't be surprised that their $9000-$12,000 gizmo-laden throw-away techie wonders aren't.
 

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