NEW RIDERS/refresher | Page 2 | GTAMotorcycle.com

NEW RIDERS/refresher

bobparry

Member
Hello everyone!
Also if let's say I ride the bike to mechanic to get it certified and cops pull me over what happens? (i have no insurance) Would they understand that I'm only taking it to mechanic and not really riding or they'd still fine me?
Would they understand? Oh yes they wold totally understand - understand how to make you sorry you ever looked at your ride! The no insurance fine is $5k to start, the failing to register change of ownership and no plates and tow bill to get you off the side of the road.... It's just reality so know your limits and play within it. It's dangerous to count on someone else giving you a break.
 

Leathal

New member
Great review.

I'd like to know more about the gear though. What's the difference between a jacket and a back protector? I though most jackets had this built in?
Not unless you buy a real high-end jacket... $5000+... (grin)

Leathal
 

atamjeetk

New member
Nice Review. Just one question: you mention not to brake in a corner, which is logical. However, if you are coming into a corner too fast (beginner mistake) and think you may go of the road; is it better to use the front brake or the rear?
 
D

D

Guest
Nice Review. Just one question: you mention not to brake in a corner, which is logical. However, if you are coming into a corner too fast (beginner mistake) and think you may go of the road; is it better to use the front brake or the rear?
good question-
This can be a bit tricky especially for someone new.
If you are carrying that much speed then what I WOULD DO is look at the corner setup and brake as much as I can (front brakes, shave the speed off), lean over further than normal to pull the bike into the corner. I have ridden the front brakes partly through a corner from the same situation BUT I knew the bike would want to "stand up" therefore I compensated by shifting my weight to the side of the turn and pulled the bike down with me even further.

If you are carrying that much speed at least you will hopefully low side the bike. If I can't make that turn then my next goal is to low side the bike.

As I mentioned, that's what I would do...also the above info I don't think a new person would be comfortable doing and probably does not know all the things involved. The mindset and knowledge will not come together so quickly in that moment.

Just go SLOW...practice your technique, speed is a natural result of proper technique...it rarely if ever works the other way around.

LOOK,LEAN, BELIEVE.
 

SLOMAG

Member
Site Supporter
LOOK,LEAN, BELIEVE.
You're soo deep D! I never new that about you.

So since your 250 only has one rotor on the front, does that mean you can only execute your senerio in one direction since it will pull opposite??
 

IXFe

Well-known member
Site Supporter
Nice Review. Just one question: you mention not to brake in a corner, which is logical. However, if you are coming into a corner too fast (beginner mistake) and think you may go of the road; is it better to use the front brake or the rear?

similar question. where i work, the driveway into our parking lot is actually on a signifcant bend on a busy thoroughfare.
so i have to slow down and brake, right? during the turn so i can make an even sharper turn into our driveway.

or how about when exiting the highway sometime the exits are curvy and you have to brake to slow down, right?:confused::confused:

i'm hoping they explain this @ rider training.
 

BusaBob

Well-known member
Site Supporter
It is okay to GENTLY use the FRONT brakes to gently slow down during a gentle curve (they teach this at Humber).

It is NOT safe to brake hard during a curve at speed, as this will likely lead to a crash. Applying too much rear brake while decelerating AND beginning to lean over to enter a corner will lead to a crash because while you are decelerating, there is less weight on the rear tire. Too much braking under this condition will cause the rear tire to lock up and slide. Unless you are a very advanced rider, it is not advisable to use rear brake while entering a corner (a technique called trail braking -- see below)

The ideal is to do all your significant braking before even entering a corner, and then negotiating the corner by modulating the throttle and your lean angle. For this reason it is very important that you are familiar with a corner before trying to take it fast. Start familiarizing yourself with a corner gradually (at slower speeds, progressively trying it a little faster, and a little faster each time), so that there is lots of room for error and correction.

Realizing too late that a corner you've rushed into is tightening far quicker than you can lean the bike (that is, the curve is turning sharper than you can turn your bike) is a very, very bad thing and should be avoided at all costs. Essentially, if you find yourself in this situation, it is already too late. In this circumstance the only option is to look for a safe run-off (not likely to exist unless you are at a racetrack), stand the bike up and pray that you can keep it up as you go "cross country". Any sudden steering inputs or braking while you are going "cross country" will likely lead to loss of control. Stand on your pegs to help absorb the bumps.

But most likely, there will be nowhere to safely run off (due to ditches, fences, oncoming traffic, etc). All you can do in this circumstance is look through the corner, and lean harder into the corner (push-steer harder), and pray that you have enough traction to not low-side (fall over on your side). Leaning hard into corners at speed is an advanced skill and should only really be practiced in earnest at a racetrack under qualified instruction.
Tire technology these days is incredible. With luck, you will not be going so fast as to overcome the tires ability to grip the road during the leaning, and you will make it through the corner.

Racers do what's call "trail braking". In trail braking, you are still braking during the initial part of the curve. This is possible because as the motorcycle is progressively leaning over, there is still enough traction to allow some braking which is progressively decreased as the bike leans harder into the corner. Imagine this equation:
(grip for braking) + (grip for cornering) cannot be greater than the maximum traction available.

if all your traction is used up for cornering, even a little brake tap will cause loss of grip and a crash. Knowing how much traction you have for a particular corner at a particular speed for a particular tire pressure, for a particular temperature day only comes with experience.

Hope that helps.


similar question. where i work, the driveway into our parking lot is actually on a signifcant bend on a busy thoroughfare.
so i have to slow down and brake, right? during the turn so i can make an even sharper turn into our driveway.

or how about when exiting the highway sometime the exits are curvy and you have to brake to slow down, right?:confused::confused:

i'm hoping they explain this @ rider training.
 
S

spaz

Guest
Hey!

I'm a beginner looking to buy my first bike. I'm looking at private ads on website and being a beginner I don't really know much ab out bikes so I'm scared about purchasing one! I noticed you said you can pay a reputable shop to inspect one? Do you recommend any in the downtown Toronto area? How does it work? Cost?

THANKS!
 
N

noobinacan

Guest
this is helpful information. from the sounds of it, i might be spending more on gear than the cost of my first bike.
someone mentioned a jacket for $5000?:confused:
nope.
You should look for used gear, you can find some really good deals on this site.

budget for $1000. for a Good Helmet, Jacket and Pants atleast.
Gloves are cheaper compared to rest, around $50 for a good pair.
boots - depending on what kind of riding you are dooing, also depending on how much walking you are doing.

I have a pair of SHIFT HAVOC pants and wear my usualy ankle high leather boots. more of a street setup.
 

Teal

Well-known member
Speaking from experience I strongly disagree. First, what are stock settings and how can one ensure that their bike is set up to these settings? Second, there is more than enough adjustability, at least among SS bikes, that can lead to great instability if not set up correctly.

RE:Suspension.....Unless you are majorly underweight or overweight you are not going to benfit well enough from a suspension alteration to even bother. Unless of course you are an expert rider and are seeking more performance from your bike. The R&D that goes into all these current motorcycles makes them suitable for any rider from the get go, barring the above mentioned few. Leave the suspension alone, if you can't ride like Nickey Haden, stock settings and other performance will do fine.
 

crow_milo

Active member
Site Supporter
Re: New Riders tips-Buying/Insurance/Gear/Riding

Keep in mind the insurance coverage noted above is a good thing, but if you are financing the bike, the lender will require you to have full coverage, and they have their own min/max of deductables.
 

shikou

New member
I'm a new rider picking up a new bike 09 Ninja 250. Im pretty small Im 5'5 weighing 120lbs how do I know what to adjust in my suspension? Since i dont even know what style i have sort of speak should i bring it in to mechanic to change the settings, or is there some good articals for me to read reguarding this, or is the stock settings ok for my weight (im thinking im too light).
 
S

Shahid

Guest
Re: New Riders tips-Buying/Insurance/Gear/Riding

*****I will hope the mods keep this thread tidy as to keep the valid information at the top and easier for people to read. This post is not for debating but feel free to make it better.*****

After reading the posts and remembering some of last years posts as well as people I run into, a few things occurred so I thought I would post up to help out the new people and perhaps some of the other smarter members will add their 2 cents also.

Insurance:

1.Make sure you have the proper coverage and you understand what you are getting, remember the agents/brokers make a commission from you so they can oversell you things you do not need.

2. Move your deductibles to $1000 to reduce your premiums. It's not in your interest anyways to claim anything under $1000 so why pay for something you will not use.
(this is just a suggestion if it makes sense for you to do)

3. Drop collision on a bike that is worth less than $2500…if it makes sense for you and you can afford it.

4. Make sure you got all of your legal paperwork, the penalties are more severe now.


Gear:

1. YES! You NEED it. There is a saying that it’s better to sweat than bleed.

2. Think of your gear as an investment into YOUR protection. Did you do your best to protect yourself with the money you had at the time? So you have more money now, did you update or add to your protection.

3. If you don’t feel that the person selling you stuff is knowledgeable or just wants your money, WALK AWAY. Everything should fit you properly. Snug is the word, keep in mind that new items i.e. helmets and leather jackets do break in and will get “bigger”.

4. So you got your helmet, jacket, and gloves…WHAT ABOUT your boots, back protector, and knee armor?

5. Spend more money on your gear vs. getting the “right” bike.

6. Tires and steering dampers count as proper gear also.

BIKE:

1. Get a bike that you are comfortable on, not what your friends think looks cool. Hell, I ride a scooter, so who cares what others think. It’s about what you want.
It’s your first bike, you will get another. You are new and you are LEARNING.

2. I have helped a lot of people with this part and it can be overwhelming or fun.
Do not buy a bike alone if you are not comfortable with what you are doing.
If you are buying new from a dealership it’s easier. If you are buying used, GET someone who is KNOWLEDGABLE and has had a few bikes. You can also pay a reputable shop to INSPECT (not just certify) the bike. If the seller has issues with that suggestion then WALK AWAY. The more information you have the better. If you get a “weird vibe” from the seller…WALK AWAY.



2. Got the bike and ready to ride- NO you may NOT be ready. It’s a new machine and you do not know how it handles etc… practice in a parking lot for an hour and take a break for the day, then practice again the next day for another hour. You should notice improvements. Do not hit the streets until you are 99.99% comfortable. MAKE SURE that you have ANOTHER person watching you as you practice in the parking lot. When you are ready to hit the road, try to get your friend to drive their car/bike in front of you (debatable front or back, get one for front and back even better).

3. DO NOT tense up, relax and STAY ALERT. Enjoy the experience of learning. You WILL probably make mistakes like the rest of us. Learn from it, and keep on going. If you fall, step back for a minute and realize why you fell and get back on and ride assuming you are not hurt.

4. Get to know the bike you are on. How fast does it accelerate? How fast can it brake? How does it corner?

5. One of the BIGGEST little things people do not do, GET the suspension setup for your weight and riding style. Educate yourself as to how suspension works. Lots of good articles online. You do not need to become an expert but by knowing the basics of how each part works you can identify the “problem” areas and adjust them. People buy used bikes that were setup for the previous owner and they do not realize HOW MUCH of a difference their bike can handle if it was setup for them. Shops like Pro6 and Riders Choice offer such a service BUT make sure YOU TELL them what how long you have been riding and what type of rider you are now.

6. If a car cuts you off or does something illegal/not right. Let the car be “right” even though you are right on the roads. Better to be alive than right.

7. RIDE AT YOUR PACE it's NOT a race- If you join a group that’s too fast. Go back. Remember to look ahead and prepare and don’t hit the brake in the corner. LOOK, LEAN, LOOK, LEAN, keep LOOKing.
Your weight should be shifted on the side that you are turning. The ball of your foot should be on the peg pressing down as you corner...try steering your bike in a parking lot with just your feet on the pegs and shifting your weight to that side (holding on to your bars of course).

8. Signup for Fastridingschool.com or something similar. It’s not about speed as you may think, it’s about technique. Technique makes you faster and “safer”.

If you have any questions, post up or pm me. If you got something good to add please do and I will try to add it to this list. It’s not a race but instead an adventure. I think this might be the only hobby (maybe skydiving…lol) where the destination is not as important as much as the journey to get there is. Stay Safe and have fun.

D.
(Scootah Nation)...stop laughing you ;)
For motorcycle jackets,gloves and chaps check us out at;
www.nbsportsnsafety.com
shahidshah@nbsportsnsafety.com
 
S

Section 6

Guest
hey Im a newb at this so excuse the dumb question you guys mentioned a back protector and i ve seen a guy wearing only that downtown is this becuase its doesnt fit under the jacket or because hes a "pro"? And is the padding in the jacket u buy not good enough? finally Im thinking of getting a 09 Hyosung gt 250r any feed back on this bike???
 

roks

New member
nope.
You should look for used gear, you can find some really good deals on this site.

budget for $1000. for a Good Helmet, Jacket and Pants atleast.
Gloves are cheaper compared to rest, around $50 for a good pair.
boots - depending on what kind of riding you are dooing, also depending on how much walking you are doing.

I have a pair of SHIFT HAVOC pants and wear my usualy ankle high leather boots. more of a street setup.
Drive to Guelph, there is a huge store with prices competing US internet stores
Royal distributing or something.

jacket - 150/200 and up
Joe Rocket pants - 150-200
cool gloves - 70
Icon helmet - 170
hiking boots in wallmart for ~50
plus taxes
And you are ready to go...
 

rafiki911

Well-known member
Site Supporter
Re: New Riders tips-Buying/Insurance/Gear/Riding

Thanks for the info!!!
 

redlinerush

Well-known member
THIS!!:
I'm a new rider picking up a new bike 09 Ninja 250. Im pretty small Im 5'5 weighing 120lbs how do I know what to adjust in my suspension? Since i dont even know what style i have sort of speak should i bring it in to mechanic to change the settings, or is there some good articals for me to read reguarding this, or is the stock settings ok for my weight (im thinking im too light).
I'm somewhere along the same with this guy, weighing little more, tippy toe a little to stand up the bike at full stop. Thought about if lowering the bike will help me have an easier time stopping and controlling the bike. someone mentioned earlier there are great articles about adjusting suspension and so on, anyone care share?
thanks
 

Top Bottom