Lost keys for old motorcycle | GTAMotorcycle.com

Lost keys for old motorcycle

Emily750

New member
Hello! I am new to this forum and just had a quick question.

I bought a project bike last year, a 1981 Yamaha Maxim XJ750 (the frame is a 650 maxim frame but the engine was swapped with the 750).

It's almost completely done, the last thing I need to do before getting it insured and plated is to fix an oil leak and throw on a new gas tank. However, I haven't started the bike up since the fall, and I can't find the keys for it anywhere. It was the only key the guy I bought it from gave me and I'm frustrated. My boyfriend's concern is that since the bike has a lot of different parts from other bikes (a lot of stuff got switched out) it will be almost impossible to get a new key made that works. I'm not sure if this is the case or not - would a locksmith be able to cut a new key? Or do I have no other choice but to find it? Is there any ways to start it up in the meantime? I'm still quite new to the riding community so I apologize if this is a dumb question, it's my first bike and I want nothing more than to get her running.
 

Sebi

Don't call me Shirley
Site Supporter
Is there any ways to start it up in the meantime? I'm still quite new to the riding community so I apologize if this is a dumb question, it's my first bike and I want nothing more than to get her running.
On my R6 (once the immobilizer is disabled in the ECU) it's 2 wires that need to be shorted that act as the ignition. I doubt your bike has an mobilizer. I would trace the wires coming off the ignition and see where they go. Most likely it's 2 wires that you can wire into a switch if you're not worried about theft or a keyed switch if you are.
 

Jayv

Well-known member
Site Supporter
Look at this old link, if you pull the cylinder out the locksmith should be able to cut you a new key.

 

Sixbagger

New member
Check out a Yamaha dealer. Many moons ago I had a key cut for a Maxim X that I had. The dealer wanted to see
the ownership first, and ran the VIN which gave them the code they needed to use to cut the blank.

If not, follow Jayv's suggestion.
 

GreyGhost

Well-known member
Site Supporter
Old bikes have some advantages. I used to start my CB450SC with a fork by poking the contacts on the back of the switch. As others have said, I don't anticipate problems getting a working key for your bike.
 

Robbo

Well-known member
Check out a Yamaha dealer. Many moons ago I had a key cut for a Maxim X that I had. The dealer wanted to see
the ownership first, and ran the VIN which gave them the code they needed to use to cut the blank.

If not, follow Jayv's suggestion.
If there is a number engraved on the face of the keyswitch, make sure to take that to the dealer too. In fact, you could remove the keyswitch and bring it with you to the dealer or a locksmith that cuts keys for motorcycles.

(Just in case the keyswitch has been swapped out).

Would hate for you to get a key cut based on vin only to find out the keyswitch is not original.



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Robbo

Well-known member
If there is a number engraved on the face of the keyswitch, make sure to take that to the dealer too. In fact, you could remove the keyswitch and bring it with you to the dealer or a locksmith that cuts keys for motorcycles.

(Just in case the keyswitch has been swapped out).

Would hate for you to get a key cut based on vin only to find out the keyswitch is not original.



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Where are you located (general area / main intersection) so someone can recommend a dealer or locksmith close to you?

In the meantime, check motorcycle jacket pockets, jewelery box, tool box, key box, old purses, m/c parts boxes, old key rings, envelope with paperwork that came with the bike, etc.

Personally, I keep all my bike keys in a container hidden in the house.


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Mad Mike

Well-known member
If you're stuck and don't find what you need by Friday, PM me. I restore those old beasts, I'm pretty sure I have a brand new lockset (gas cap, ignition, and helmet lock). I have a soft spot for those who keep antique bikes as daily riders -- I'll look in my shop tomorrow, if it's still there it's yours!
 

tricky

Well-known member
Site Supporter
If there is a number engraved on the face of the keyswitch, make sure to take that to the dealer too.
You could also check ebay based on this number. I've bought missing keys for my bike that way
 

bitzz

Well-known member
You can take that number to your local bike breaker's that collects keys for old motorcycles. There wasn't that many different keys.
If that doesn't pan out take the ignition lock to a LOCKSMITH, a REAL locksmith, who can cut a key or re-key the lock.
If THAT doesn't pan out MC Distributing sells an aftermarket replacement for that ignition switch part # 12-0057
 

Bobo

Well-known member
In the early eighties in Scarborough there was a prolific motorcycle thief who went by the name “Nick The Bike Man”. He stole motorcycles ( and occasionally cars) to support his cocaine habit. His bike of choice was the Yamaha RD350LC (same Yamaha vintage as yours) for two reasons, the first being that racers ,at the time,went through those things like cheap underwear and he had no problem selling them.Half the guys at Shannonville we’re racing bikes supplied by Nick.The second reason was that Yamaha ignitions had only something like 12 different keys to fit their ignitions and Nick had 8 of those keys (supplied by a friend that worked at Toronto Motorbike on Eglinton).Sadly,Nick succumbed to his addiction at the age of 24 ,the friend at Toronto Motorbike went on to become a prominent figure in the motorcycle community and currently operates a dealership in the Toronto area. True story,you can’t make this stuff up.If you know the number on the key that you had, you might be able to go to a Yamaha dealer and actually order the key instead of getting one cut.The number may be on the ignition switch.You could also try taking your ignition switch to a cycle salvage and get them to jam old Yamaha keys into it until one fits.Its a long shot but a great story.
 
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Riceburner

Well-known member
One of my previous Honda key fit a buddy's Honda. I could start it even though our keys were different...just enough similarity and worn lock to work.
 

tricky

Well-known member
Site Supporter
One of my previous Honda key fit a buddy's Honda. I could start it even though our keys were different...just enough similarity and worn lock to work.
I ordered a set of keys for my S90 from eBay based on the number on the lock, only to realize when they arrived that they were the exact same as my CT90 keys. Same number and everything.
 

Relax

Well-known member
Call Bill at Bill's Lock Service and ask what he recommends. He's a fellow rider and excellent locksmith. I've had him supply and cut new OEM keys from the key code of my Hawk GT, as well as rekey the tumblers to my place when I moved in.

6790 Davand Dr #8, Mississauga, ON L5T 2G3
Phone: (905) 564-3434
 

TK4

Well-known member
Remove the ignition switch or seat lock and look on the back side.
There should be a code (letter and numbers as I recall).
Take that to someone (local bike shop ?) with a Curtis key puncher and/or code book and they should be able to make you a new one.
 

junior

Well-known member
I lost my only key last summer and had a locksmith come out and cut me a new key. It was amazing, he used a flashlight and a pick, counted a few things in the lock cylinder, then went to his van and cut me a key. I'll find his contact and DM you.
 

JavaFan

gringo diablo
Site Supporter
I lost my only key last summer and had a locksmith come out and cut me a new key. It was amazing, he used a flashlight and a pick, counted a few things in the lock cylinder, then went to his van and cut me a key. I'll find his contact and DM you.
cool story, that's an old school Craftsman
 

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