Life altering injuries | Page 2 | GTAMotorcycle.com

Life altering injuries

nobbie48

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Got my first bike in 1972, yes I'm older than dirt. For the first few years I would regularly ride with a passenger. I started seeing friends and other riders getting injured from crashes. I started riding solo because I no longer wanted to be responsible if my passenger got injured from a mistake someone or myself made. I don't think I could handle my passenger ending up with life altering injuries. That's just me, but to each their own.
I've had a few requests, "Take my kid for a ride" and I pass on them. No gear no ride and I don't provide. "Oh but just around the block / parking lot." Nope. Same reason.
 

oioioi

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I've had a few requests, "Take my kid for a ride" and I pass on them. No gear no ride and I don't provide. "Oh but just around the block / parking lot." Nope. Same reason.
That is smart and responsible.
But people don't understand the reasoning behind it and automatically would judge us as rood mean.
 

oomis

Well-known member
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[QUOTE="nobbie48, post: 2657645, member: 298"

Is it harder to forgive ones self or someone else?
[/QUOTE]

I dunno. I'll let you know when I figure it out.
 

nobbie48

Well-known member
Site Supporter
[QUOTE="nobbie48, post: 2657645, member: 298"

Is it harder to forgive ones self or someone else?
I dunno. I'll let you know when I figure it out.
[/QUOTE]

My favourite riding destination was Amish Ohio, Holmes county. On one trip I picked up a perpetual calendar, one you flip over each day getting a nice picture and bit of wisdom. One has the comment "Those that can't remember are better off than those that can't forget." I reflect on that thought every once in a while wondering about the trade offs.
 

Krime

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Somehow I found myself to this post. Not directly related but fellow rider and member HarleyHare, my father, just suffered a major stoke yesterday morning. He lives alone and thankfully he had the intuition to call 911 with symptoms at 1am. He was eventually transported from his local hospital to Sunnybrook to undergo emergency surgery to remove the clot, which was a success but they are still unaware of the extent of his brain damage. I've spent the last day and a half outside the hospital and on or by my phone waiting for updates as we were (understandably) not allowed into the hospital because of the pandemic. 4 hours after his surgery he was showing signs of communicating and movement in his paralyzed limbs. Today, a couple hours ago, I heard his heavily slurred voice for the first time as he struggled to get his words out. The nurse has reported that he's gaining some mobility in his leg again, with the ability to clench his right hand.

It's still early and I am trying to remain as optimistic as possible. I pray that he'll be able to recover to as much of his previous self as possible, and back on two wheels. Riding is something we've shared together since I was 7 years old (almost 30 years now). The highlight of our riding trips was in 2013 through the alps, ride report was posted here: Europe 2013 - 13 day loop through the Dolomites, Alps and Vercors
 

Evoex

The God
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Somehow I found myself to this post. Not directly related but fellow rider and member HarleyHare, my father, just suffered a major stoke yesterday morning. He lives alone and thankfully he had the intuition to call 911 with symptoms at 1am. He was eventually transported from his local hospital to Sunnybrook to undergo emergency surgery to remove the clot, which was a success but they are still unaware of the extent of his brain damage. I've spent the last day and a half outside the hospital and on or by my phone waiting for updates as we were (understandably) not allowed into the hospital because of the pandemic. 4 hours after his surgery he was showing signs of communicating and movement in his paralyzed limbs. Today, a couple hours ago, I heard his heavily slurred voice for the first time as he struggled to get his words out. The nurse has reported that he's gaining some mobility in his leg again, with the ability to clench his right hand.

It's still early and I am trying to remain as optimistic as possible. I pray that he'll be able to recover to as much of his previous self as possible, and back on two wheels. Riding is something we've shared together since I was 7 years old (almost 30 years now). The highlight of our riding trips was in 2013 through the alps, ride report was posted here: Europe 2013 - 13 day loop through the Dolomites, Alps and Vercors
best wishes to your family on a speedy recovery. sending good vibes his way!

incidents like this remind us just how fragile our time here is...i find Snewj (of youtube) a bit of a joke but he has some very strong words which resonate to me "if you want something in this life, no hesitation, go get it."
 

GreyGhost

Well-known member
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Somehow I found myself to this post. Not directly related but fellow rider and member HarleyHare, my father, just suffered a major stoke yesterday morning. He lives alone and thankfully he had the intuition to call 911 with symptoms at 1am. He was eventually transported from his local hospital to Sunnybrook to undergo emergency surgery to remove the clot, which was a success but they are still unaware of the extent of his brain damage. I've spent the last day and a half outside the hospital and on or by my phone waiting for updates as we were (understandably) not allowed into the hospital because of the pandemic. 4 hours after his surgery he was showing signs of communicating and movement in his paralyzed limbs. Today, a couple hours ago, I heard his heavily slurred voice for the first time as he struggled to get his words out. The nurse has reported that he's gaining some mobility in his leg again, with the ability to clench his right hand.

It's still early and I am trying to remain as optimistic as possible. I pray that he'll be able to recover to as much of his previous self as possible, and back on two wheels. Riding is something we've shared together since I was 7 years old (almost 30 years now). The highlight of our riding trips was in 2013 through the alps, ride report was posted here: Europe 2013 - 13 day loop through the Dolomites, Alps and Vercors
I wish you and your dad the best of luck getting through this.
 

BigEvilDoer

Well-known member
@Krime -- all the best, really... I know from personal experience how heartbreaking the spot you're in is.
 

oioioi

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All the best to you and your dad and the entire family.

Stay strong and he will come out of it as if nothing happened. I am sure you will be able to enjoy 2 wheels together again.
 

ifiddles

Well-known member
@Krime - sending prayers out to you and your dad...may he get better soon and return to normal

p.s...just clicked on your trip link and all I can say is WOW...we need to chat once this is all over...stay safe and keep healthy...
 

regder

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Krime, wishing your dad a quick recovery. All the best to both of you
 

hedo2002

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So many give in to those requests, thinking "what could go wrong?" In the 70's my best friends "little brother" we were maybe 10 at the time the brother was about 8. Got on the back of a dirt bike, in his driveway. The rider, who was about 16 at the time, popped the clutch, never was determined if it was on purpose or accidental. The brother didn't have a helmet on, went over and off the back of the seat. Hitting his head on the gravel driveway. He died.

All because someone, (who even at 16, should have known better, but as young people we have ALL done stupid things), thought "what could go wrong?"

@Krime. all my thoughts and prayers.

I've had a few requests, "Take my kid for a ride" and I pass on them. No gear no ride and I don't provide. "Oh but just around the block / parking lot." Nope. Same reason.
 

nobbie48

Well-known member
Site Supporter
So many give in to those requests, thinking "what could go wrong?" In the 70's my best friends "little brother" we were maybe 10 at the time the brother was about 8. Got on the back of a dirt bike, in his driveway. The rider, who was about 16 at the time, popped the clutch, never was determined if it was on purpose or accidental. The brother didn't have a helmet on, went over and off the back of the seat. Hitting his head on the gravel driveway. He died.

All because someone, (who even at 16, should have known better, but as young people we have ALL done stupid things), thought "what could go wrong?"

@Krime. all my thoughts and prayers.
The centre of balance would be way off and especially with a short wheelbase, tall sitting bike a pop up wheelie is common.
 
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GreyGhost

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The centre of balance would be way off and especially with a short wheelbase tall sitting bike a po up wheelie is common.
I took my dad for a ride once on the ape. My dad is a big guy. Absolutely terrifying. So hard to keep the front down and it pushed like a mother through the corners. Weight distribution was just awful. I could see how someone could wipe out without even trying to do something dumb (and it reinforced my belief that demo rides that allow passengers are playing with fire).
 

nobbie48

Well-known member
Site Supporter
Somehow I found myself to this post. Not directly related but fellow rider and member HarleyHare, my father, just suffered a major stoke yesterday morning. He lives alone and thankfully he had the intuition to call 911 with symptoms at 1am. He was eventually transported from his local hospital to Sunnybrook to undergo emergency surgery to remove the clot, which was a success but they are still unaware of the extent of his brain damage. I've spent the last day and a half outside the hospital and on or by my phone waiting for updates as we were (understandably) not allowed into the hospital because of the pandemic. 4 hours after his surgery he was showing signs of communicating and movement in his paralyzed limbs. Today, a couple hours ago, I heard his heavily slurred voice for the first time as he struggled to get his words out. The nurse has reported that he's gaining some mobility in his leg again, with the ability to clench his right hand.

It's still early and I am trying to remain as optimistic as possible. I pray that he'll be able to recover to as much of his previous self as possible, and back on two wheels. Riding is something we've shared together since I was 7 years old (almost 30 years now). The highlight of our riding trips was in 2013 through the alps, ride report was posted here: Europe 2013 - 13 day loop through the Dolomites, Alps and Vercors
An eerie story:

There was a family I knew of because one of their sons went to the same high school as me. After high school the sons moved out and mom and dad had the apartment to themselves.

One evening mom answers the phone and makes a funny face as she listens. Dad sees it and takes takes the phone hearing gibberish. He says "What's the matter buddy, too much to drink" and then recognizes his son's voice. He either had a stroke or aneurysm. 911 was called and the son survived.

This was before telemarketing and my mind asks a bunch of what ifs. If they didn't answer the phone or jumped to the wrong conclusion and hung up etc.

Your dad did the right thing by calling 911 but it is understandable why someone would call mom or dad instead.

One of the reasons I hate telemarketers is that they trigger a hang up response to any unusual call.
 

Joe Bass

*probably eating right now*
Site Supporter
@Krime my prayers to you and your father @HarleyHare during this time and praying for a full recovery.

Sent from my Pixel 3a using Tapatalk
 

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