Learning a track fast? | GTAMotorcycle.com

Learning a track fast?

Misti

Active member
When you go to a new track, how do you learn it? What steps do you take to try and remember the layout and what do you find works best for learning it quickly and why? :)
 

Katatonic

Well-known member
Site Supporter
When you go to a new track, how do you learn it? What steps do you take to try and remember the layout and what do you find works best for learning it quickly and why? :)
YouTube videos and Track layout maps (or Google satellite view).


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miggs

Well-known member
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Ask someone who knows the track for a tow for a lap or two
 

Wingboy

Well-known member
Moderator
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Ask someone who knows the track for a tow for a lap or two
This.Unless it's Calabogie.It takes at least a weekend to get that one down pat.And then just when you think you know it,it'll bite you.
 

Katatonic

Well-known member
Site Supporter
Ask someone who knows the track for a tow for a lap or two
Yes, this.

I had been to Shannonville a few times, and the last time there in the Fall I got Smergy to lead me around for a session or two. By the end of the day I had knocked off 10+ seconds a lap!



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Trials

Well-known member
Don't you walk it first?
 

bakaboy

Old, Slow and Grumpy
Site Supporter
When you go to a new track, how do you learn it? What steps do you take to try and remember the layout and what do you find works best for learning it quickly and why? :)
Concentrate 1 corner at a time
Draw a map of what you think the track is noting apex locations etc.
Practice again
Review your map and correct
Then have your friend lead you
 

Lightcycle

Motorcycle Nomad
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Probably not relevant to local tracks, but racers at international tracks play video games of the circuits they're about to race. Doesn't matter the vehicle, F1, Motogp, etc., at least they learn the layout quickly.

I agree with the YouTube video suggestion, but sometimes the fixed-point videos don't give you the 270 degree field of view with all the reference points as you go past them at speed. I'll watch a POV video of Calabogie or Mosport and get confused exactly where they are on the track until a few turns into the video.
 

Jayv

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I remember the first time i did a lap at Mosport i was so surprised at how much elevation there was from corner 4 to corner 5.

Watched so many races on TV in the 90's, but was not expecting how different it looked on a bike at speed.

Ben Spies did the you tube thing, i guessed it helped as he won the WSBK title first time out.
 

N3WMAN

Well-known member
Watch video of the track/layout. Just go out and ride it. Tail someone with more pace for a few laps.

If I am watching video I try and find a racer, the faster the better. Random trackday rider videos are a real crapshoot in terms of lines and braking points.
 

caboose56

Well-known member
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Like others have mentioned, find a good on-board video. I’ll add that it should be from a car.

I watched the same video of Tremblant maybe 50 times before riding it. By the time I actually got onto the track I already knew the layout.

Very helpful for tracks like Tremblant, Bogie, Mosport.
 

Misti

Active member
All good suggestions here but how do you take what you see via you tube videos/video games or even someone towing you around the track and solidify what you are seeing so that you can do it on your own?

For example, someone above said to draw the track which is something I used to do when racing to learn a track ASAP. Why might drawing and marking down things like apex points be more helpful than just following someone around. What other kinds of things might you include on your drawing?
 

bakaboy

Old, Slow and Grumpy
Site Supporter
All good suggestions here but how do you take what you see via you tube videos/video games or even someone towing you around the track and solidify what you are seeing so that you can do it on your own?

For example, someone above said to draw the track which is something I used to do when racing to learn a track ASAP. Why might drawing and marking down things like apex points be more helpful than just following someone around. What other kinds of things might you include on your drawing?
I have lead many riders. Afterwards they couldn't tell me the track. Couldn't identify effectively turn in or apex locations.

Drawing the track allowed them to focus on each corner at a time focused on those elements.

When I say draw the track I don't mean a single line with your pencil. The actual track showing width allows identification of asphalt elements, race lines in relationship to width and apex etc.

This works well I find with novice riders.
 

Misti

Active member
I have lead many riders. Afterwards they couldn't tell me the track. Couldn't identify effectively turn in or apex locations.

Drawing the track allowed them to focus on each corner at a time focused on those elements.

When I say draw the track I don't mean a single line with your pencil. The actual track showing width allows identification of asphalt elements, race lines in relationship to width and apex etc.

This works well I find with novice riders.
Exactly! Just following someone doesn't solidify the track for you unless you put some active attention on learning it for yourself. I get frustrated when I go to a track and someone starts telling me what to look at and where to turn etc....makes no sense to me unless I start finding my own ways of remembering.

Drawing the track, as you say, not a single line but the entire track, from memory will help you get a clear picture in your mind. Plus then you can start adding things to the map that will help you become more located on track.

When you have something specific to look at or aim for, then you can not only learn a track quickly but can then start to get more and more consistent with hitting the same lines.

So what kinds of things might you write down on your map? What points would you want to have solidified?
 

caboose56

Well-known member
Site Supporter
What are your actual objectives? Fast lap times?

If you’re going to draw your lines between sessions you need people to discuss it with.

If you’re going to follow someone you need to be able to discuss it with them before and after.

You also need to be focused on specific goals every single lap, every single session. If you’re headed out there and your goal is “I’m just gonna go faster” you’re wasting your time. You need specific goals on how you’re going to improve specific sections of the track.

Write it down, talk about it, do it, talk about it some more. What worked, what didn’t, why did it work, why didn’t it work, etc...
 

Rob Star

Well-known member
Site Supporter
What are your actual objectives? Fast lap times?

If you’re going to draw your lines between sessions you need people to discuss it with.

If you’re going to follow someone you need to be able to discuss it with them before and after.

You also need to be focused on specific goals every single lap, every single session. If you’re headed out there and your goal is “I’m just gonna go faster” you’re wasting your time. You need specific goals on how you’re going to improve specific sections of the track.

Write it down, talk about it, do it, talk about it some more. What worked, what didn’t, why did it work, why didn’t it work, etc...
Very well said. Might I add a small ego and an open mind with some attention to detail never hurt.
 

meme

Well-known member
Site Supporter
I remember the first time i did a lap at Mosport i was so surprised at how much elevation there was from corner 4 to corner 5.

Watched so many races on TV in the 90's, but was not expecting how different it looked on a bike at speed.
Try running it! I've run every track that I've been on. I find that helps with figuring out elevation changes. I never realized how much of an uphill climb the back straight is, until I tried it on shoes. Jebus, should have run it counterclockwise! However the climb from 3-2-1 would be just as horrendous!
 

Misti

Active member
What are your actual objectives? Fast lap times?

If you’re going to draw your lines between sessions you need people to discuss it with.

If you’re going to follow someone you need to be able to discuss it with them before and after.

You also need to be focused on specific goals every single lap, every single session. If you’re headed out there and your goal is “I’m just gonna go faster” you’re wasting your time. You need specific goals on how you’re going to improve specific sections of the track.

Write it down, talk about it, do it, talk about it some more. What worked, what didn’t, why did it work, why didn’t it work, etc...
Like this, especially the part about having an objective and specific goals every single session. We all know that when you go out and just try and ride fast, it never works out, lol! So, what kinds of goals could/should you have? What kinds of things might you go out and practice each session out?
 

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