insurance wants receipts of repair bill | GTAMotorcycle.com

insurance wants receipts of repair bill

johnnie_c

Well-known member
hi... need some advice

I recently got into an accident and was paid by the insurance to repair the bike... now they want receipts

I've skimped on the repairs, only doing what I feel is necessary. I did not bother doing up everything as I find the scratches and stuff are only cosmetic, so basically I have some money left over... but they want the receipts...

If I give them the receipts, and they do up the totals, will this mean they will be recouping some of the funds? i.e. coming back after me for a cheque?

I want to keep as much money as I can... help!
 

WarpTiger

Well-known member
Site Supporter
send them pictures showing you repaired it your self and claim the rest left over as labor since they didn't pay you enough to fully repair the bike at a shop.

do not attempt these actions until you consult with professional help.
 

Tango5

Well-known member
Ok, I don't know what you should do. But here's what I would do; I would send them the receipts they asked for. More than likely they just want evidence of what was repaired so that you don't put in a claim for this same un-repaired damage at some future point in time. They will also likely reduce the value of the vehicle in the event of a total loss. As long as the estimates they based the payout on are not fraudulent, I don't think you should be overly concerned about being upfront with your insurer.
 

WarpTiger

Well-known member
Site Supporter
has a friend get a pay out but repaired it himself half assed by kicking it out. insurance company asked and just said because his car was a write off next time there is an accident he wont be covered for damages.
 

Alvito

Well-known member
How much of a difference are we talking about?

If you asked for $1000 for repairs, and you only used $300. And you're pocketing $700. Isn't this fraud?
 

ViperZ

Well-known member
Site Supporter
How much of a difference are we talking about?

If you asked for $1000 for repairs, and you only used $300. And you're pocketing $700. Isn't this fraud?
I wouldn't think it works like that. You don't 'ask' the insurance company for money. They assess the damage and prepare a repair estimate.
 

johnnie_c

Well-known member
the adjuster said to change the following:
exhaust pipe (a rivet was scratched down and is now flush...a minor thing in my opinion) -
swingarm (based his assessment on the bent chain guard)
fairing pads,
mirror, footpegs, etc.

I reused all the above parts as i thought they were minor and did not warrant a change.

thats fraud? If anything I'm hurting myself (residual/resale value) by not making all the repairs since there are minor scratches and stuff...

i guess from another perspective it can be fraud... who knows.. insurance people chime in please.
 

johnnie_c

Well-known member
I wouldn't think it works like that. You don't 'ask' the insurance company for money. They assess the damage and prepare a repair estimate.
you're exactly right, the adjuster came up with astronomical numbers, thats the reason I got so much money....basically anything with a scratch was assessed as requiring a replacement - his perspective was basically to get the bike back to where it initially was before hte accident...
 

Ten98_Ducati

Active member
Can you say that you picked up a parts bike and used the pieces of that and have someone make you a bill of sale for a parts bike ?
 

BusaBob

Well-known member
Site Supporter
you're exactly right, the adjuster came up with astronomical numbers, thats the reason I got so much money....basically anything with a scratch was assessed as requiring a replacement - his perspective was basically to get the bike back to where it initially was before hte accident...
and to think PRIMMUM refuses to pay me enough to repair my motorcycle to the condition it was prior to it getting knocked over onto its side while parked by another motorist.
 

jeero

Well-known member
Site Supporter
and to think PRIMMUM refuses to pay me enough to repair my motorcycle to the condition it was prior to it getting knocked over onto its side while parked by another motorist.
Good to know to not look into Primmum next time I shop for insurance (March '12).
 

nobbie48

Well-known member
Site Supporter
Without numbers this is theoretical but:
Give them the receipts being honest and then tell them that they didn't give you enough to bring the bike back 100%. You made the bike rideable and are bargain hunting with what's left of the money so you can complete the repairs on budget.
As mentioned, they are concerned about a second claim and paying twice for something that wasn't fixed in the first place.
 

Rob MacLennan

Well-known member
Moderator
Site Supporter
If you didn't do the mandated repairs, in the manner they priced out (likely having a shop do the repairs), then they are likely going to be wanting the excess back. It could well be considered fraud.
 

jeffjones

Well-known member
Site Supporter
and to think PRIMMUM refuses to pay me enough to repair my motorcycle to the condition it was prior to it getting knocked over onto its side while parked by another motorist.
I thought you refused their offer because they took your high mileage into account for their determination on re-sale value?
Mileage does hurt the re-sale value big time regardless of the condition you keep your bike in.
 

Rob MacLennan

Well-known member
Moderator
Site Supporter
I thought you refused their offer because they took your high mileage into account for their determination on re-sale value?
Mileage does hurt the re-sale value big time regardless of the condition you keep your bike in.
Resale value doesn't affect repair costs, only the point at which the bike would be deemed irreparable. At least it shouldn't.
 

jeffjones

Well-known member
Site Supporter
If you didn't do the mandated repairs, in the manner they priced out (likely having a shop do the repairs), then they are likely going to be wanting the excess back. It could well be considered fraud.
I just went through this only they haven't asked for receipts but the took my original quote and walked around the bike to make sure everything that was on the quote was repaired.
When accepting the cash payout you dont have to fix anything on your bike if you don't want to, They are asking for receipts to see what you fixed so if there is another accident they dont double pay you for repairs. If your swingarm had a scratch on it and you didn't fix it and you got into another accident and it got dented, they don't have to pay for that repair.

But whatI was going to do (an totally legal) was take the cash payout and sell my bike (cosmetic damage) and take all the money and buy a newer bike, But I have an accident on my insurance (different accident) and state farm said if I get a new policy the accident will take effect and raise my insurance.

So I fixed everything on my bike plus a new chain and sprockets and pocketed $1500 and everyone is happy.
They said you accepted the cash payout and until you can prove it was fixed
 

jeffjones

Well-known member
Site Supporter
Resale value doesn't affect repair costs, only the point at which the bike would be deemed irreparable. At least it shouldn't.
But they offered to write it off and pay him out the resale value for his bike (which was lower due to extremly high mileage) or a cash payout (which is always less then the repair cost) and he wasn't happy with either.
 

lil sushi

Well-known member
Site Supporter
I'll admit I haven't read through everyone's reply, so my apologies if this is redundant...

I'm not a claims adjuster, work in the insurance industry, and only know enough to get by, however the reason I believe they want receipts is to "indemnify" you.

See insurance is all about returning you to the state you were in PRIOR to the accident. So to insure your bike, they need to know what state it's in. Giving them receipts after the repair will give them an idea for the next possible accident (ie. if it gets knocked over, the pipe was already scratched prior to).

They will pay you out according to what the market value of that part was. If you got a deal on the part because you for example get a store discount for being a loyal customer, they cannot then turn around and take back the difference. They are paying you for what the part was worth at the time of the accident. so if their book says your exhaust was a million dollars...so be it.

This is a one time pay out claim for them. Really, the difference in parts is not what they're concerned about. Bodily Injury claims are much more time intensive.

So to sum up my two cents, they only want receipts to ensure that the NEXT incident that might possibly happen with your bike, they know what "state" it was in prior to the incident.

I went through something similar with my bike back in May. It helped when they knew what I had repaired in the hit and run in June. All new parts had to be replaced again and they had the receipts to prove it.

Hope that helps.
 

BusaBob

Well-known member
Site Supporter
I thought you refused their offer because they took your high mileage into account for their determination on re-sale value?
Mileage does hurt the re-sale value big time regardless of the condition you keep your bike in.
I have refused their offer, because what they offered cannot repair my bike fully to the condition it was in before, which is what I want.

The value they've given it is not in line with reality, even with mileage taken into consideration. Everyone I've spoken to has been shocked at how little PRIMMUM is offering. Even taking the cash payout, I cannot replace my motorcycle with one in equivalent condition without being out a large sum of money.

Even sourcing out parts and doing the work myself or having friends do it for me, I will be significantly in the hole with repair costs, not to mention the time I've had to devote to this instead of having a licensed shop do all the work.

All this because of the negligence of another person.
 
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